Book Reviews

  • Permalink Women and children of Maiduguri Borno following Boko Haram occupation// Photo Credit: HazteOir.org, 2015Gallery

    Book Review – Women and the War on Boko Haram: Wives, Weapons, Witnesses by Hilary Matfess

Book Review – Women and the War on Boko Haram: Wives, Weapons, Witnesses by Hilary Matfess

Richard Moncrieff says this book gives a provocative insight into women’s life in Boko Haram.

At the end of January 2015 I attended a meeting in Ndjamena in the presence of Moussa Faki, then Chadian Foreign Minister, now head of the African Union Commission (AUC). The subject was Boko Haram, which had just invaded the town on Baga on the […]

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    Book Review: Zimbabwe’s Migrants and South Africa’s Border Farms: The Roots of Impermanence by Maxim Bolt

Book Review: Zimbabwe’s Migrants and South Africa’s Border Farms: The Roots of Impermanence by Maxim Bolt

Dagna Rams argues Bolt’s book should appeal to anthropologists interested in borderlands and political economy of agriculture.

Maxim Bolt’s book Zimbabwe’s Migrants and South Africa’s Border Farms: The Roots of Impermanence shines a light on the life of the South African borderland with Zimbabwe, where white farmers escaping Mugabe’s repressive politics moved to establish themselves and hired a black workforce. […]

Book Review – Mandela’s Kinsmen by Timothy Gibbs

Anne Heffernan says Mandela’s Kinsmen by Timothy Gibbs should be required reading for  anyone seeking to understand the imprint of rural and Bantustan politics on South Africa’s national stage.

On 15 December 2013, Nelson Mandela was laid to rest in the rural village of Qunu, in South Africa’s rural Eastern Cape. Mandela had grown up in Qunu, at the […]

Book Review – A Moonless, Starless Sky by Alexis Okeowo

Grace Thompson says Okeowo’s latest book is a compelling reminder of the lives of ordinary people that are hidden behind headlines of violence and war zones.

“There is never a single story about any place,” stated the Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in a powerful Ted Talk almost 10 years ago. The danger of having a single story of […]

Book Review – Why We Lie About Aid by Pablo Yanguas

According to Thomas Kirk, this book is an engaging rallying cry to reinterpret our discourses around aid and move away from quantifying successes based solely on value for money.

Every so often you read something that brilliantly articulates an idea or issue you have been struggling with for a while but could not eloquently capture. For me, Why We Lie About Aid […]

  • Permalink Photo Credit: Liz Storer 2016, Annual Pilgrimage to the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Lodonga, Yumbe District, North-West UgandaGallery

    Book Review – Christianity, Modernity and Development by Paul Gifford

Book Review – Christianity, Modernity and Development by Paul Gifford

Liz Storer says this book highlights the connection between diverse forms of worship and developmental issues in sub-Saharan Africa.

In ‘Christianity, Modernity and Development’, Professor Paul Gifford marshalls his extensive experience of more than 30 years research in African churches and religious communities to open a conversation as to what exactly might constitute ‘African Christianity’ in contemporary times.

 

Gifford argues that at present, much writing on the […]

Book Review – Love Does Not Win Elections by Ayisha Osori

Bronwen Manby says this humorous book gives a unique insight into Nigerian politics.

This unique book should be required reading for those interested in the promotion and consolidation of democracy, whether as scholar or activist. It offers a candidate’s-eye view of what it takes to contest a primary election to run for office as a member of Nigeria’s House of […]

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    Book Review – After Rape: Violence, Justice, and Social Harmony in Uganda by Holly Porter

Book Review – After Rape: Violence, Justice, and Social Harmony in Uganda by Holly Porter

In reviewing  After Rape: Violence, Justice and Social Harmony in Uganda, Sverker Finnström compares the work of Holly Porter to the pioneering anthropologist Margaret Mead.

Over the last decade or so post-war Acholiland in northern Uganda—from where the Lord’s Resistance Army rebels originated—has been subjected to a massive research intervention. The development leaves me partly puzzled: despite a virtual avalanche of […]

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    Book Review: The African Garrison State: Human Rights and Political Development in Eritrea by Daniel R. Mekonnen and Kjetil Tronvoll

Book Review: The African Garrison State: Human Rights and Political Development in Eritrea by Daniel R. Mekonnen and Kjetil Tronvoll

Wayne Chavulimu Kalika says this book fills the literature gap in untangling the escalating militarisation and the continuous violation of human rights not only in Eritrea but also in the entire African continent.

The African Garrison State: Human Rights and Political Development in Eritrea is a Grand East African Series book written by Kjetil Tronvoll and Daniel R. Mekonnen, Both […]

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    Book Review: Understanding West Africa’s Ebola Epidemic: Towards a Political Economy Edited by Ibrahim Abdullah and Ismail Rashid

Book Review: Understanding West Africa’s Ebola Epidemic: Towards a Political Economy Edited by Ibrahim Abdullah and Ismail Rashid

Jonah Lipton says that this book is a valuable contribution to the Ebola literature but also key for anyone interested in the state of Africa, epidemiology, and political economy.

Register to hear the editors of this book, Ibrahim Abdullah and Ismail Rashid speak at LSE on Thursday 22 April at 6.30pm, A Preventable Epidemic: The Ebola outbreak and failures of […]

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