Development

  • Permalink Women and children from Maiduguri Borno following Boko Haram occupation. Image Credit: HazteOir.org via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0 2015Gallery

    Book Review – Women and the War on Boko Haram: Wives, Weapons, Witnesses by Hilary Matfess

Book Review – Women and the War on Boko Haram: Wives, Weapons, Witnesses by Hilary Matfess

Richard Moncrieff says this book gives a provocative insight into women’s life in Boko Haram.

At the end of January 2015 I attended a meeting in Ndjamena in the presence of Moussa Faki, then Chadian Foreign Minister, now head of the African Union Commission (AUC). The subject was Boko Haram, which had just invaded the town on Baga on the […]

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    Using Google Trends to Measure Ethnic and Religious Identity in sub-Saharan Africa: Potentials and Limitations

Using Google Trends to Measure Ethnic and Religious Identity in sub-Saharan Africa: Potentials and Limitations

Google Trends has already been used by social science researchers to measure racism within a community. In this article LSE’s Elliott Green demonstrates how this online tool is useful in measuring other personal attributes that can be challenging to assess.

 

One of the more interesting online tools that has become available to social science researchers in recent years is Google Trends (GT), […]

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    Rwanda and Arsenal: Why a budding developmental state is sponsoring a football team

Rwanda and Arsenal: Why a budding developmental state is sponsoring a football team

As Rwanda becomes the latest developmental state to sponsor a football team, Pritish Behuria explores the logic behind the deal.

 

On 23 May 2018, The Rwandan Development Board announced that it had signed a ‘Visit Rwanda’ sleeve sponsorship deal – worth around 10 million pounds a year for three years – with Arsenal FC, the world’s best football club (I am clearly not an […]

Africa at Work for Women

Following the 2018 LSE Africa Summit which explored the unemployment challenge on the African continent, Fadekemi Abiru explores ways of creating a labour market that works for women.

 

“We have many female entrepreneurs in the informal sector, the issue is enabling them. An enabling environment is key, that is the only way for the continent to absorb its educated and entrepreneurial people” – […]

  • Permalink Photo Credit: Liz Storer 2016, Annual Pilgrimage to the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Lodonga, Yumbe District, North-West UgandaGallery

    Book Review – Christianity, Modernity and Development by Paul Gifford

Book Review – Christianity, Modernity and Development by Paul Gifford

Liz Storer says this book highlights the connection between diverse forms of worship and developmental issues in sub-Saharan Africa.

In ‘Christianity, Modernity and Development’, Professor Paul Gifford marshalls his extensive experience of more than 30 years research in African churches and religious communities to open a conversation as to what exactly might constitute ‘African Christianity’ in contemporary times.

 

Gifford argues that at present, much writing on the […]

Jobs cannot be created by force

Michael Famoroti explores the challenges behind job creation for African governments.

What’s the difference between a developed country and a developing country? Filling station attendants.

Whereas most of the western world allows you to fill your tank, you will still find filling station attendants in some of the largest economies in the developing world, and nearly everywhere on the African continent. The primary […]

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    Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims #PressforProgress

Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims #PressforProgress

Dorothea Hilhorst, Holly Porter and Rachel Gordon argue the lack of inclusivity in gender-targeted humanitarian aid has obscured other realities in which men and women assume different and more complex roles.

At the United Nations (UN) World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in May 2016, ‘achieving greater gender equality and greater inclusivity’ was identified as one of the five key areas of […]

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    Book Review: Why Comrades Go to War: Liberation Politics and the Outbreak of Africa’s Deadliest Conflict by Philip Roessler and Harry Verhoeven

Book Review: Why Comrades Go to War: Liberation Politics and the Outbreak of Africa’s Deadliest Conflict by Philip Roessler and Harry Verhoeven

Benjamin Chemouni says Why Comrades Go to War is an ambitious book aiming to shed a new light on the causes of the two Congo Wars (1996-1997 and 1998-2003) that led to the overthrowing of Mobutu Sese Seko in May 1997 and resulted, as the title of the book puts it, in Africa’s deadliest conflict.

Roessler and Verhoeven’s book provides an […]

Is Oxfam the Worst or the Best?

Dyan Mazurana argues that while sexual harrassment and assault of humanitarian aid workers is widespread, Oxfam Global is “one of the best international aid agencies in terms of reporting, investigating and addressing sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse of its staff”.

The sexual abuse allegations against Oxfam staff came to light because Oxfam has one the best reporting systems in the […]

February 21st, 2018|Development, Featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink University of Gondar grew out of what was once the Public Health College, which was established in 1954. 
Image Credit: University of GondarGallery

    Haile Selassie and his quest to develop a Westernised medical system in Ethiopia

Haile Selassie and his quest to develop a Westernised medical system in Ethiopia

Julianne Weis explores how a colonial mindset on Africa’s place and capacity in relation to Western medicine was fixed and applied to Ethiopia, even though the East African country had never been subject to sustained, colonial occupation like neighbouring African nations.

When Emperor Haile Selassie returned to Addis Ababa from exile in 1941, he granted immediate amnesty to the Italian […]

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