Development

  • Permalink Photo Credit: Book cover image from Mediators, Contract Men, and Colonial Capital, by Cassandra Mark ThiesenGallery

    Book Review – Mediators, Contract Men, and Colonial Capital, by Cassandra Mark Thiesen

Book Review – Mediators, Contract Men, and Colonial Capital, by Cassandra Mark Thiesen

Henry Brefo describes this book as a rich historical archive that enriches our understanding of the dynamic history of labour in the Gold Coast

Cassandra Mark Thiesen in Mediators, Contract Men, and Colonial Capital 2018 illuminates the dynamic interaction between capital, labour and industry during the initial phase of colonialism in the Gold Coast (1870s-1900s). The author unearths the complex […]

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    How representations of Africa by NGOs impact diaspora community’s identity and engagement with international development

How representations of Africa by NGOs impact diaspora community’s identity and engagement with international development

Dr Edward Ademolu outlines how his interest in the politics of visual representation particular in the development/humanitarian spheres evolved.

Read Part 1 of this article

What role, if anything, do representations of Africa by NGOs have on identity and engagement with International Development, by African diaspora communities?” Do they, readily accept development representations as visual documentaries upholding authoritative truths about Africa […]

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    Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Dr Edward Ademolu outlines how his interest in the politics of visual representation particular in the development/humanitarian spheres evolved.

As a young child in the 1990s my introduction to international development was through watching the performative biennial telethon ‘Red Nose Day’ of Comic Relief, a major UK charity. This high-profile event armed with prosthetic noses, mainstream contemporary music, and […]

Japan and the African Challenge

Although Japan was the first country to launch a forum on African development, the East Asian giant’s Africa engagement is now lagging behind some of its fellow Asian powers, argues Anne-Léonore Dardenne.

Over the last decade, Africa has undergone a substantial transformation and has attracted the attention of major Asian powers such as China, India, Japan and more recently South Korea. […]

Refugees are Givers, not just Takers

LSE’s Joanna Lewis reports from a World Refugee Day event which showcased the vital role of refugees in rebuilding their home communities.

 

“I am here to contribute. I am here to give back. I am here to give a hand to refugees to help rebuild their lives. “

These were just some of powerful statements delivered by Ms Shukri Adan, a […]

  • Permalink Sure you may be the Public Authority round here, but can you fill in a logframe?Gallery

    How DFID works with non-state power holders in fragile and conflict-afflicted places

How DFID works with non-state power holders in fragile and conflict-afflicted places

Duncan Green interviews DFID’s Wilf Mwamba about how donors understand and work with public authority.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

One of the highlights of the recent conference on accountability and empowerment in fragile/conflict states was hanging out with a true ‘development entrepreneur’, Wilf Mwamba. Wilf, a rising star […]

  • Permalink Women protest in the city center against President Pierre Nkurunziza's decision to run for a third term. Credit: Igor Rugwiza Photography via Flickr(https://flic.kr/p/t6P2YW_)Gallery

    Escaping the Fragility Trap? Why is it so hard to think constructively about fragile states?

Escaping the Fragility Trap? Why is it so hard to think constructively about fragile states?

Duncan Green reviews a new report from the International Growth Centre which examines how countries can escape the trap of fragility.

Just been reading the report of the ‘Commission on Fragility, Growth and Development’. Hosted by LSE and Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government; big name chairs (David Cameron, Donald Kaberuka and the LSE’s Adnan Khan). And I think it’s a bit […]

  • Permalink Thousands of Zimbabweans gathered on the streets of Harare on 18 November 2017 celebrating the expected fall of the erstwhile President 
Image Credit: Zimabawean-eyes via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)Gallery

    Civil society organisations can have a pivotal role in #Zimbabwe’s transition towards building a democratic nation

Civil society organisations can have a pivotal role in #Zimbabwe’s transition towards building a democratic nation

As Zimbabwe continues to adjust to the country’s new leader, Ringisai Chikohomero argues that the change of regime has opened an opportunity for civil society organisations to engage with the government.

For decades, Zimbabwe has been dominated by personality politics and patronage networks which have curtailed the country’s progress. The ‘military-assisted transition’, as it is called, of November 2017 which […]

  • Permalink A woman enters M-Pesa mobile money agent in Kenya Image Credit: Erict via Flickr (https://bit.ly/2uCywqp)Gallery

    Africa can spearhead a new technology revolution, but it will require large-scale investment from governments

Africa can spearhead a new technology revolution, but it will require large-scale investment from governments

As tech solutions by African entrepreneurs are replicated globally, Nwamaka Ogbonna points out the missing piece in the continent’s bid to leapfrog development.

 

Economists hardly agree on anything but if there is one thing most of them agree on, it is that technology and innovation are critical for economic growth and development. This perhaps explains why the latest innovations out […]

  • Permalink The research team  engage in georeferencing maps at the National Land Commission in Kenya
Image Credit: Catherine BooneGallery

    Refocusing scholarly attention on Kenya’s smallholder settlement schemes is long overdue

Refocusing scholarly attention on Kenya’s smallholder settlement schemes is long overdue

LSE’s Catherine Boone highlights how a new research collaboration with the Kenya Land Commission will shine new light on a central pillar of the Kenya government’s efforts to address land injustice.

 

Smallholder settlement schemes have played a central role in the economic and political development strategies in postcolonial Kenya.  In the transition to independence, settlement schemes help de-racialise land ownership […]

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