Development

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    Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims #PressforProgress

Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims #PressforProgress

Dorothea Hilhorst, Holly Porter and Rachel Gordon argue the lack of inclusivity in gender-targeted humanitarian aid has obscured other realities in which men and women assume different and more complex roles.

At the United Nations (UN) World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in May 2016, ‘achieving greater gender equality and greater inclusivity’ was identified as one of the five key areas of […]

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    Book Review: Why Comrades Go to War: Liberation Politics and the Outbreak of Africa’s Deadliest Conflict by Philip Roessler and Harry Verhoeven

Book Review: Why Comrades Go to War: Liberation Politics and the Outbreak of Africa’s Deadliest Conflict by Philip Roessler and Harry Verhoeven

Benjamin Chemouni says Why Comrades Go to War is an ambitious book aiming to shed a new light on the causes of the two Congo Wars (1996-1997 and 1998-2003) that led to the overthrowing of Mobutu Sese Seko in May 1997 and resulted, as the title of the book puts it, in Africa’s deadliest conflict.

Roessler and Verhoeven’s book provides an […]

Is Oxfam the Worst or the Best?

Dyan Mazurana argues that while sexual harrassment and assault of humanitarian aid workers is widespread, Oxfam Global is “one of the best international aid agencies in terms of reporting, investigating and addressing sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse of its staff”.

The sexual abuse allegations against Oxfam staff came to light because Oxfam has one the best reporting systems in the […]

February 21st, 2018|Development, Featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink University of Gondar grew out of what was once the Public Health College, which was established in 1954. 
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    Haile Selassie and his quest to develop a Westernised medical system in Ethiopia

Haile Selassie and his quest to develop a Westernised medical system in Ethiopia

Julianne Weis explores how a colonial mindset on Africa’s place and capacity in relation to Western medicine was fixed and applied to Ethiopia, even though the East African country had never been subject to sustained, colonial occupation like neighbouring African nations.

When Emperor Haile Selassie returned to Addis Ababa from exile in 1941, he granted immediate amnesty to the Italian […]

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    Book Review: Dealing with Government in South Sudan (2015) by Cherri Leonardi

Book Review: Dealing with Government in South Sudan (2015) by Cherri Leonardi

Diana Felix da Costa argues that this book offers valuable insights into processes of state formation and state-society relations across South Sudan as well as in East Africa

Cherry Leonardi’s book Dealing with Government in South Sudan is a detailed and rich account of the historical development of chiefship and of the state in southern Sudan. Focusing on three urban areas and […]

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    Who cares about Africa? British and American conservatisms in African development

Who cares about Africa? British and American conservatisms in African development

Stefan Andreasson examines how the Republican and Conservative parties dealt with African development since the late Cold War era. He explains why American input has been more prominent, while the British have come to resign themselves to a managed decline in relations with Africa.

 
Who cares about Africa? Does political ideology inform whether or not such care exists and how it is […]

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    Book Review: Infrastructure in Africa: Lessons for Future Development edited by Mthuli Ncube and Charles Leyeka Lufumpa

Book Review: Infrastructure in Africa: Lessons for Future Development edited by Mthuli Ncube and Charles Leyeka Lufumpa

Emmanuel Zwanbin says this book is a must-read for policymakers, academics and researchers on Africa’s infrastructure development issues.

Ncube and Lufumpa’s book Infrastructure in Africa: Lessons for Future Development offers an in-depth information on the state of infrastructure in Africa as a fragmented sector in need of harmonisation.  With commanding statistical data, the authors argued that cooperation and coordination will enhance […]

Burundi under Malthus’ scrutiny

Louis-Marie Nindorera argues that Burundi’s political leadership will be a key determinant in how the country manages land scarcity.

As the time for a new population census approaches, Burundi counts its mouths to feed, breaks up, plows and seeds its land. Under demographic pressure, it gets smaller and smaller, less and less fertile. Today, 11,5 million inhabitants are squeezed into a […]

Reading List: Most popular @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2017

It is that time of the year when we stop to take stock of the last 12 months and we are happy to present the best-read @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2016, as voted by you with your clicks. If you missed any of these, here is your opportunity to catch up!

Film Review: NGO – Nothing Going On -LSE […]

8 events that marked the continent in 2017

As the year comes to an end, Grace Thompson looks at 8 events that marked 2017:

Death of Botswana’s former president

Quett Masire, the second president of Botswana, passed away on June 22. Although not as famous as his predecessor, Seretse Khama, Masire had a decisive impact on the progress and success of Botswana. In his article, “Former Botswana President Quett […]

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