Education

Transformative Research: is it the way forward for Africa?

A growing number of policymakers, researchers and funding bodies have gotten excited about transformative research on Africa. Transformative research, they claim, may support progress towards economic, social and environmental sustainability in Africa and may enhance the participation of local actors in development research and cooperation. This may happen, if we actually knew what transformative research meant and how best […]

  • Permalink Main street, Paoua, north west Central African Republic (CAR)
Credit: DFID / Simon Davis via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1QpGWXb) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Welcome to our look back to our most popular book reviews of 2016.

Book Review – Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia: Monarchy, Revolution and the Legacy of Meles Zenawi Edited by Gérard Prunier and Éloi Ficquet – An impressive volume, one which contains a wealth of information on the historical, cultural and religious underpinnings of the landlocked country in the Horn of Africa, […]

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Blog Posts of 2016

It is that time of the year when we stop to take stock of the last 12 months and we are happy to present the best-read @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2016, as voted by you with your clicks. If you missed any of these, here is your opportunity to catch up!

Gambia continues to defy existing political norms on the […]

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    Sampling, snowballs and non-strategies: How to accidentally stumble upon data ​

Sampling, snowballs and non-strategies: How to accidentally stumble upon data ​

LSE’s Femke Gubbels describes the snowball sampling technique proved useful while doing research in Tanzania.

 
Participant sampling techniques are of relevance to any study involving human subjects. The options are myriad and choosing the right one hinges on what your research is trying to uncover. When conducting research guided by ethnographic principles, it is not uncommon to use snowball sampling; […]

  • Permalink The statue of Cecil Rhodes finally falls at the University of Cape Town on 9 April 2015
Photo Credit: Desmond Bowles via Flickr (http://bit.ly/27dUE6W) CC BY-SA 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: #RhodesMustFall: Nibbling at Resilient Colonialism in South Africa by Francis B Nyamnjoh

Book Review: #RhodesMustFall: Nibbling at Resilient Colonialism in South Africa by Francis B Nyamnjoh

#RhodesMustFall: Nibbling at Resilient Colonialism in South Africa is timely, balanced and informative, but aspects of the book will leave the reader craving more says Simukai Chigudu.

In 2015, a wave of student protests erupted across South African universities. They overwhelmingly expressed discontent at the failure to ‘decolonise’ tertiary education 21 years after the dawn of the democratic era. Beginning […]

We need to know more about Africa

Professor Tim Allen, inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa made possible through a generous gift from Firoz Lalji through the Lalji Family Foundation, highlights the inadequate amount of rigorous and independent research being done on Africa and calls for institutions in the Global North to increase their engagement with African scholarship, including with African researchers working in […]

Where is the ‘African’ in African Studies?

We need to put the ‘African’ in African Studies, not as a token gesture, but as an affirmation that Africans have always produced knowledge about their continent, says Robtel Neajai Pailey.

Last week, I was invited by Eritrean-Ethiopian masters student Miriam Siun of Leiden University’s African Studies Centre to give one of two keynote lectures on the topic, “Where Is the […]

  • Permalink The South Africa Fallist campaigns was among the issues discussed at the Codesria conference Photo Credit: Desmond Bowles via Flickr (http://bit.ly/27dUE6W)Gallery

    Academic Freedom in Africa: 25 Years After the Kampala Declaration

Academic Freedom in Africa: 25 Years After the Kampala Declaration

Simukai Chigudu reports from the recent CODESRIA conference in Lilongwe where African scholars gathered to discuss issues affecting African scholarship such as intellectual freedom, South Africa’s Fallist movements and African studies in the Western Academy.

‘Intellectual freedom in Africa is currently threatened to an unprecedented degree. The historically produced and persistent economic, political and social crisis of our continent continues […]

  • Permalink The glass dome at Edinburgh Waverley station was symbolic of the glass ceiling of the colonised academyGallery

    Scholars Tackle the Persistence of Colonial Legacy in the Academy and Society at Large

Scholars Tackle the Persistence of Colonial Legacy in the Academy and Society at Large

After attending the recent Decolonizing the Academy conference, LSE’s Aaron Munzaa asserts that while listening is good, it is critical that there is active engagement in deconstructing dominant and oppressive power structures and legacies in all spheres of life.

Conversations on colonisation and racism are difficult to have between races. These brutal racial ideologies have left a scar in the […]

  • Permalink The statue of Cecil Rhodes finally falls at the University of Cape Town on 9 April 2015
Photo Credit: Desmond Bowles via Flickr (http://bit.ly/27dUE6W) CC BY-SA 2.0Gallery

    Decolonising education is reflexive, deliberate, and necessary

Decolonising education is reflexive, deliberate, and necessary

LSE’s Yossie Olaleye, Hope Kyarisiima, and Camilla Omollo reflect on the debates that took place at the Decolonising Education conference that took place at the University of Sussex on Monday 11th April.

The concept of decolonisation—or decoloniality—has existed for decades, particularly in use among postcolonial scholars and activists from the Global South. Fanon’s decolonisation theory, for example, posed philosophical questions […]

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