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    Making Family: The Journey into Exile of a South Sudan Refugee – Part 2 #LSEreturn

Making Family: The Journey into Exile of a South Sudan Refugee – Part 2 #LSEreturn

Through the story of Chol, LSE’s Naomi Pendle explores the meaning of exile and the lived experience of being a refugee through cycles of displacement and return. In the first article of this two-part series, Pendle tells us how Chol rebuilt home after years spent in exile. Now, LSE’s Naomi Pendle narrates Chol’s return into exile, a journey that […]

  • Permalink Image Credit: Naomi PendleGallery

    Making Family: The Journey into Exile of a South Sudan Refugee Part 1 #LSEreturn

Making Family: The Journey into Exile of a South Sudan Refugee Part 1 #LSEreturn

Through the story of Chol, LSE’s Naomi Pendle explores the meaning of exile and the lived experience of being a refugee through cycles of displacement and return. In the first article of this two-part series, Pendle tells us how Chol rebuilt home after years spent in exile.

This article is part of our Displacement and Return series, which features blog […]

  • Permalink Photo credit: Rosalind Shaw, Tufts WikiGallery

    Book review: Religion, Tradition, and Restorative Justice in Sierra Leone (2017), by Lyn S. Graybill

Book review: Religion, Tradition, and Restorative Justice in Sierra Leone (2017), by Lyn S. Graybill

Dr Rosalind Coffey says Graybill’s book is a fascinating reminder of the dangers which can stem from regarding justice as immutable.

Lyn S. Graybill’s Religion, Tradition, and Restorative Justice in Sierra Leone asks how Sierra Leoneans put the pieces of shattered lives and relationships back together in the aftermath of the country’s brutal and protracted civil war.  It does so in […]

January 12th, 2018|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|

Revisiting ‘justice’ in northern Uganda #LSEreturn

Two studies in the current issue of the Journal of Eastern African Studies re-visit the fascinating debate about justice and reconciliation in northern Uganda, nearly ten years since the fighting between the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the Government of Uganda (GoU) stopped on Ugandan soil, as Anna Macdonald, Holly Porter and Letha Victor discuss in this article.

This […]

  • Permalink Gulu in Northern Uganda Photo Credit: Fiona Graham / WorldRemit via Flickr (http://bit.ly/21v4Zpp) CC BY-SA 2.0Gallery

    Masculinity and Militarisation under an Illiberal Democratic Regime

Masculinity and Militarisation under an Illiberal Democratic Regime

Rebecca Tapscott explores how Uganda’s ruling regime leverages tensions between masculine ideal-types to govern young men in the informal security sector.

In a new article, Policing men: militarised masculinity, youth livelihoods, and security in conflict-affected northern Uganda, Dr Rebecca Tapscott examines what masculinity can tell us about how the Ugandan state—an illiberal yet nominally democratic regime—governs its civilian population. Through […]

January 10th, 2018|Featured, Gender|0 Comments|

Burundi under Malthus’ scrutiny

Louis-Marie Nindorera argues that Burundi’s political leadership will be a key determinant in how the country manages land scarcity.

As the time for a new population census approaches, Burundi counts its mouths to feed, breaks up, plows and seeds its land. Under demographic pressure, it gets smaller and smaller, less and less fertile. Today, 11,5 million inhabitants are squeezed into a […]

Book Review: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf by Pamela Scully

 In scarcely 100 short pages, this excellent addition to the Ohio Short Histories of Africa series offers a valuable perspective on Liberia’s outgoing President, and Africa’s first elected female Head of State.  With its small size yet wide scope, it sometimes reads less as a biography of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and more as a potted history of the Republic […]

On Democratic Despond

As inequality in Nigeria widens, Ebenezer Obadare explores the growing disenchantment with democracy in the most populous African nation.

 

Final Destinations

A few years ago, I noticed that an unusually high number of well-placed Nigerians were being reported in the media as having passed on in different hospitals and clinics outside the country. Once I started keeping tabs, two patterns clearly […]

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews 2017

Here at the Africa at LSE blog, we love bringing to the attention of the public books about Africa. As the year draws to an end, here are our most popular book reviews of 2017. Some great reviews and books haven’t made this list, do visit the book reviews section of our blog to discover more.

The Root Causes […]

Reading List: Most popular @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2017

It is that time of the year when we stop to take stock of the last 12 months and we are happy to present the best-read @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2016, as voted by you with your clicks. If you missed any of these, here is your opportunity to catch up!

Film Review: NGO – Nothing Going On -LSE […]

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