Finance

  • Permalink Some of the loans were for tuna fishing
Photo Credit: Steve Evans via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2jWd6j5) CC BY-NC 2.0Gallery

    Mozambique fell prey to the promise of fabulous wealth – now it can’t pay nurses

Mozambique fell prey to the promise of fabulous wealth – now it can’t pay nurses

Nurses and teachers are among those bearing the brunt of a debt crisis rooted in the mistaken belief that major gas reserves would bring untold riches, reports LSE’s Joseph Hanlon.

Mozambique’s £1.6bn borrowing spree has caused a fiscal crisis that means interest on loans, civil service new year bonuses and other government bills was not paid this month.

Four years ago, […]

January 31st, 2017|Featured, Finance|1 Comment|
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    Reducing Incentives for Fiscal Indiscipline at Nigeria’s Subnational Government Level

Reducing Incentives for Fiscal Indiscipline at Nigeria’s Subnational Government Level

LSE’s Eustace Uzor offers potential solutions for improving fiscal governance in Nigeria’s subnational units.

The need to achieve fiscal convergence and consolidation in Nigeria cannot be overemphasised. This is especially important considering that the economy recently slipped into recession, according to data from the National Bureau of Statistics. One notable factor for this is the high level of fiscal indiscipline […]

January 16th, 2017|Featured, Finance|0 Comments|
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    Economic solutions are crucial to help solve Somalia’s political woes

Economic solutions are crucial to help solve Somalia’s political woes

Maximilien von Berg argues that a formalised and inclusive financial sector is necessary for Somalia’s political and economic prospects to improve.

 

With the 2016 presidential contest looming, political stakes are high in Somalia. Yet, it is no secret that this race falls way short of a democratic election. This is precisely why the economy should have every development partner’s complete […]

  • Permalink Syrian refugees in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, located 10 km east of Mafraq, Jordan on 27 March 2016.
Image credit: World Bank Photo Collection, Dominic ChavezGallery

    The economics of humanitarian aid: Are we on a slippery slope?

The economics of humanitarian aid: Are we on a slippery slope?

Could the current modalities of humanitarian aid to refugees be improved? Dr. Stephanie Levy argues for more creative aid agreements to form the backbone of the global response to the current refugee crisis.

At the World Humanitarian Summit (WH Summit), David Miliband, head of the International Rescue Committee, announced that 25% all of all IRC interventions will be ‘cash based distributions’ […]

  • Permalink Photo Credit: AMISOM Public Information via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1WiqEmB) Public Domain Gallery

    Domestic savings may be the answer to Africa’s fiscal woes

Domestic savings may be the answer to Africa’s fiscal woes

The West has proven that monetary policy is no longer a silver bullet, argues Julians Amboko.

In the run up to the 2008/09 Great Recession, belief in monetary policy as a countervailing force against potential hard-landings evolved to a near article of faith. During the reconstruction from the ensuing wreckage, central banks across the globe engaged in liquidity expansion exercises […]

  • Permalink Central Bank of Kenya 
Photo Credit: *SHERWOOD* via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1WEyMOG)  CC-BY-SA-2.0Gallery

    Currency depreciation and diverging inflation rates block the road to monetary union in Africa

Currency depreciation and diverging inflation rates block the road to monetary union in Africa

Getting regional integration right is more important than getting it quickly, writes Julians Amboko.

The chase for regional monetary unions seems to be part of Africa’s 21st century holy grail:

In November 2013, Heads of State of the East African Community (EAC) signed the region’s monetary union protocol in accordance with Article 5 of the EAC Treaty of Establishment.
The Southern African […]

  • Permalink The Chinese-built school in the rural village of Yoni in Sierra Leone Credit: Why Nations Fail blogGallery

    Are African leaders misusing Chinese development finance? The price of country ownership

Are African leaders misusing Chinese development finance? The price of country ownership

In a 2012 blog post, MIT’s Daron Acemoglu and Harvard’s James Robinson call attention to a “fancy school” built in a small village in Sierra Leone and financed by Chinese development aid. They ask a pointed question: “Why would anyone want to build a wonderful school in the middle of what Africans call ‘the bush’?” As Acemoglu and Robinson […]

August 31st, 2015|Development, Finance|2 Comments|

The State of Nigeria’s Finances

Michael Famoroti analyses whether some of the terms in the new bailout package for state governments in Nigeria is a satisfactory measure in the long term.

Finally, some welcome news. Civil servants across the nation suffering from the fiscal crunch afflicting many states have reason to hope. The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has moved to supplement the bailout package […]

August 11th, 2015|Finance|0 Comments|
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    Financing Africa’s Infrastructure Gap through New Forms of Co-investments and Partnerships with Sovereign Wealth Funds

Financing Africa’s Infrastructure Gap through New Forms of Co-investments and Partnerships with Sovereign Wealth Funds

LSE’s Juergen Braunstein assesses the implications of the trend of direct investment of state-owned investment funds and how this relates to the infrastructure financing needs of sub-Saharan Africa.

As of 2014 global Sovereign Wealth Fund (SWFs) assets under management are an estimated US$ 6.5 trillion. Due to their deep pockets and a long-term investment horizon, SWFs are ideal financiers for […]

November 21st, 2014|Finance|0 Comments|
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    Paying your soldiers and building the state in post-genocide Rwanda

Paying your soldiers and building the state in post-genocide Rwanda

Benjamin Chemouni relates how finding an efficient way to pay Rwandan soldiers became a crucial element of post conflict state-building. Ensuring soldiers have legal access to financial resources is crucial for the state to fulfil its primary mission: retain the monopoly of violence. As seen in the Democratic Republic of Congo, difficulties providing soldiers with adequate resources may result in […]

October 15th, 2014|Featured, Finance|1 Comment|

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