Human Rights

  • Permalink Northeastern Kenya 1. Photo credit: IRIN Photos via Flickr( http://bit.ly/2kiGwIY) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
 Gallery

    Book review: Making the Mark; Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting by Miroslava Prazak

Book review: Making the Mark; Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting by Miroslava Prazak

Annemarie Middelburg describes the book as an absolute must-read that gives voice not only to Kuria people who have undergone male or female circumcision in Kenya, but to everyone connected to the practice.

Miroslava Prazak is a scholar of development and cultural change at Bennington College. She has spent more than twenty years with the Kuria people in the rolling […]

The Trial of Thomas Kwoyelo: Opportunity or Spectre

Anna Macdonald and Holly Porter examine the political and social dynamics that shape local perspectives on the first war crimes prosecution of a former Lord’s Resistance Army fighter, Thomas Kwoyelo.

The pre-trial of Thomas Kwoyelo –the first war crimes prosecution of a former Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) fighter, and the only domestic war crimes prosecution in Uganda starts up again […]

November 17th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|3 Comments|
  • Permalink Fatou Bensouda and Luis Moreno Ocampo, the current and former Chief Prosecutor for the ICC have both made mistakes in their handling of cases
Photo Credit: Coalition for the ICC via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2eTtdrR)  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Africa and the International Criminal Court: the road to divorce

Africa and the International Criminal Court: the road to divorce

Jon Silverman analyses the roots of African states’ dissatisfaction with the International Criminal Court.

If the rule of law means anything, it is a no-brainer that impunity for those who commit egregious crimes has to be challenged. But when the mechanism for doing that is the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the sole target of its prosecutions is the continent […]

November 15th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gambian President Yahya Jammeh attends a meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) in Dakar, April 2, 2012. (Joe Penney / Reuters)Gallery

    The Gambia’s unsurprising renunciation of the ICC, or the so-called “International Caucasian Court”

The Gambia’s unsurprising renunciation of the ICC, or the so-called “International Caucasian Court”

LSE’s Ian Sprouse explains the decision of The Gambia to withdraw from the International Criminal Court through a retrospective on the rule of President Yahya Jammeh.

On 25 October 2016, The Gambia’s information minister, Sheriff Baba Bojang, announced the intention of the tiny West African country to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC). Echoing Burundi’s claims, Mr Bojang accused […]

November 10th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink South African President Jacob Zuma shares a laugh with Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir (Photo: Ntswe Mkoena / EPA)Gallery

    Some Thoughts on South Africa’s Withdrawal From the International Criminal Court

Some Thoughts on South Africa’s Withdrawal From the International Criminal Court

LSE alumnus Mark Kersten debates key issues around the ICC withdrawal of South Africa, Burundi and Gambia.

 

Contrary to the suggestion of some, the dust on South Africa’s and Burundi’s (and Gambia‘s) withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC) has not settled. It won’t for some time. These two withdrawals have sparked an intense debate on the future of the […]

October 27th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Burundi refugees at the Mahama refugee camp, Rwanda.

Photo credit: EU/ECHO/Thomas Conan
CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (Via Flickr http://bit.ly/1K5Wbwy)Gallery

    Burundi’s Awkward — and Mostly Pointless — Farewell to the ICC

Burundi’s Awkward — and Mostly Pointless — Farewell to the ICC

Mark Kersten analyses Burundi’s withdrawal from the International Criminal Court.

 
A government led by a President accused of mass human rights violations and crimes against humanity is seeking to end its relationship with the International Criminal Court (ICC). No, the President insists, this is not about hiding from justice. Instead, Pierre Nkurunziza maintains, it is because the Court is biased […]

October 25th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    There is no system of international justice against Africa because there is no system of international justice

There is no system of international justice against Africa because there is no system of international justice

African states have made the right decision to maintain their affiliation with the International Criminal Court, says LSE alumnus and international crimininal justice expert Mark Kersten.
Following the twenty-seventh African Union summit, it seems brighter days may lie ahead for the tumultuous relationship between African states and the International Criminal Court (ICC). In the wake of the summit, which took […]

Libya can do better: the trial of Saif Gaddafi

Hilary Stauffer analyses how the trial of Saif Gaddafi fits into modern notions of international justice.

Recent reports that Saif Gaddafi has been sentenced to death by a court in Tripoli have unnerved lawyers and laypeople alike, causing discomforting ruminations about the concept of a ‘justice’. While many observers will welcome the news that someone from the Gaddafi family is being forced to atone for its collective sins, the […]

Justice, But Only For Some: The Trial of Hissène Habré

Kelly-Jo Bluen joins JiC for this critical take on the trial of Hissène Habré and the need to pursue justice for all parties responsible for atrocities in Chad.

The trial of former Chadian President Hissène Habré in Senegal in July 2015 reflects many of the tensions afflicting international justice. Habré, who is charged with crimes against humanity, torture, and war […]

The Trial of Hissène Habré: Five Thoughts

As the long-awaited trial of the former Chad leader Hissène Habré is adjourned to September, LSE alumnus Mark Kersten shares his thoughts on the long campaign that has led to one African country holding the ruler of another responsible for crimes.

In descriptions of the trial of former Chadian president Hissène Habré, no word has been used more often than […]

Bad Behavior has blocked 2945 access attempts in the last 7 days.