Human Rights

Land conflict mapping tools

Raphael Kerali talks to Africa at LSE Editor Syerramia Willoughby about research he conducted along with Julian Hopwood for the Justice and Security Research Programme among the Acholi people in the northern Uganda as they resettled in their respective ancestral lands following the end of the Lord’s Resistance Army insurgency which took place from 1987-2006.

What is the background behind […]

Understanding the Complexity of Fragmented Justice in DRC

Dr José Bazonzi talks to JSRP Research Manager Henry Radice about his recent research, and the current research environment in DRC.

 

You focus in your work on the notion of fragmented justice. What do you mean by this?

When we look at justice provision in the area I work on, Muanda in Kongo Central, there really is a multiplicity of actors […]

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    The Road Ahead — Building Momentum for Justice in the Central African Republic


The Road Ahead — Building Momentum for Justice in the Central African Republic


Patryk I. Labuda discusses the ongoing challenges of achieving justice and accountability for mass atrocities in the Central African Republic.

The Central African Republic (CAR) is the new international justice frontier. After a French-led intervention brought the country back from the brink of genocide in 2013, international efforts have focused on restoring law and order in what the International Crisis Group once called […]

  • Permalink The family of murdered journalist Norbert Zongo benefited from an African Court ruling that found that the previous government may have been complicit in his killing and in failing to find out who killed him.Gallery

    Three Decades On, the Protection of Human Rights in Africa Comes of Age?

Three Decades On, the Protection of Human Rights in Africa Comes of Age?

Chidi Anselm Odinkalu analyses the evolution of the African Commission of Human and People’s Rights since its inception.

When the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights convened in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 2 November 1987, as the continent’s pioneer regional human rights oversight institution, few thought of it as anything other than a plaything of the continent’s big men.

The […]

  • Permalink Tunisian Foreign Minister H.E Khemaies Jhinaoui (R) & President of the Court, Justice Sylvan Ore,display the Declaration which was signed on 14 April 2017 in Tunis 
Photo Credit: African CourtGallery

    A Positive Step on a Rocky Road: Tunisia signs up to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights

A Positive Step on a Rocky Road: Tunisia signs up to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights

As Tunisia becomes the first North African country to allow full access to the African Court of Human and Peoples’ Rights, Oliver Windridge, founder of The ACtHPR Monitor, discusses the challenges the Court has faced since its inception.

An air of optimism pervades the African human rights community following the recent news that Tunisia has become only the eighth African […]

  • Permalink Northeastern Kenya 1. Photo credit: IRIN Photos via Flickr( http://bit.ly/2kiGwIY) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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    Book review: Making the Mark; Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting by Miroslava Prazak

Book review: Making the Mark; Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting by Miroslava Prazak

Annemarie Middelburg describes the book as an absolute must-read that gives voice not only to Kuria people who have undergone male or female circumcision in Kenya, but to everyone connected to the practice.

Miroslava Prazak is a scholar of development and cultural change at Bennington College. She has spent more than twenty years with the Kuria people in the rolling […]

The Trial of Thomas Kwoyelo: Opportunity or Spectre

Anna Macdonald and Holly Porter examine the political and social dynamics that shape local perspectives on the first war crimes prosecution of a former Lord’s Resistance Army fighter, Thomas Kwoyelo.

The pre-trial of Thomas Kwoyelo –the first war crimes prosecution of a former Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) fighter, and the only domestic war crimes prosecution in Uganda starts up again […]

November 17th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|3 Comments|
  • Permalink Fatou Bensouda and Luis Moreno Ocampo, the current and former Chief Prosecutor for the ICC have both made mistakes in their handling of cases
Photo Credit: Coalition for the ICC via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2eTtdrR)  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Africa and the International Criminal Court: the road to divorce

Africa and the International Criminal Court: the road to divorce

Jon Silverman analyses the roots of African states’ dissatisfaction with the International Criminal Court.

If the rule of law means anything, it is a no-brainer that impunity for those who commit egregious crimes has to be challenged. But when the mechanism for doing that is the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the sole target of its prosecutions is the continent […]

November 15th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gambian President Yahya Jammeh attends a meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) in Dakar, April 2, 2012. (Joe Penney / Reuters)Gallery

    The Gambia’s unsurprising renunciation of the ICC, or the so-called “International Caucasian Court”

The Gambia’s unsurprising renunciation of the ICC, or the so-called “International Caucasian Court”

LSE’s Ian Sprouse explains the decision of The Gambia to withdraw from the International Criminal Court through a retrospective on the rule of President Yahya Jammeh.

On 25 October 2016, The Gambia’s information minister, Sheriff Baba Bojang, announced the intention of the tiny West African country to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC). Echoing Burundi’s claims, Mr Bojang accused […]

November 10th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink South African President Jacob Zuma shares a laugh with Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir (Photo: Ntswe Mkoena / EPA)Gallery

    Some Thoughts on South Africa’s Withdrawal From the International Criminal Court

Some Thoughts on South Africa’s Withdrawal From the International Criminal Court

LSE alumnus Mark Kersten debates key issues around the ICC withdrawal of South Africa, Burundi and Gambia.

 

Contrary to the suggestion of some, the dust on South Africa’s and Burundi’s (and Gambia‘s) withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC) has not settled. It won’t for some time. These two withdrawals have sparked an intense debate on the future of the […]

October 27th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|1 Comment|

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