International Affairs

Liberia needs the rule of law, not political expediency

Robtel Neajai Pailey & Edward Emmett Dillon examine the US government’s  uncanny ability to promote democracy while simultaneously undermining it.

In strongly worded statements this month that bordered on hyperbole, current and past representatives of the US government urged Liberia to speed up electoral litigation proceedings for a peaceful transition of presidential power.

In response to the Liberian Supreme Court’s suspension of a runoff election that should […]

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    During Mugabe’s 37 years rule, here are 10 things that happened

During Mugabe’s 37 years rule, here are 10 things that happened

Yovanka Paquete Perdigao goes down memory lane, to remind us how long 37 years can be.

1.The Simpsons were created

Homer, Bart, Marge, Lisa, and Maggie from the Simpsons TV show first appeared on our screens in 1987, the same year Robert Mugabe became president. Created by Matt Growning, the Simpsons debuted as shorts on the Tracey Ullman Show on 19 April 1987. […]

#Zimbabwe after #Mugabe: three reasons for hope

Fortunate Machingura looks at key issues that need to be tackled if Zimbabwe is to be hopeful again.

 

Robert Mugabe’s resignation, after what looks a lot like a military coup has ended the rule of one of the world’s most fearsome, fierce and long-serving leaders. What hope has this brought to the ordinary men and women of Zimbabwe?

I was born-free, well after Zimbabwe’s […]

Best of the Blogosphere: Mugabe’s Long Goodbye #Zimbabwe

As Robert Mugabe resigns after 37 years in power, LSE’s Grace Thompson has trawled the web to find the best articles analysing events in seven preceding days when the army led the Commander of Zimbabwe’s Defense Forces General Constantine Chiwenga seized control of the country.

 

 Understanding the Military Takeover – The army denied carrying out a coup on Tuesday 14 […]

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    Book Review – Inside Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts: Seeking Justice After Genocide by Bert Ingelaere

Book Review – Inside Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts: Seeking Justice After Genocide by Bert Ingelaere

Richard Moncrieff says  Inside Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts: Seeking Justice After Genocide is an excellent study for those seeking to understand both Gacaca and modern Rwanda.

 

Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts, a neo-traditional justice mechanism set up to deal with the overwhelming caseload following the 1994 Rwanda genocide, judged hundreds of thousands of people between 2005 and 2012. The courts were locally based, […]

Understanding the military takeover in #Zimbabwe

LSE researcher McDonald Lewanika analyses the evolving situation in Zimbabwe.

It is almost certain that a coup d’état has been staged in Zimbabwe, although the army denies it. However, we should be debating what type of coup d’état this is.

While this military takeover has the hallmarks of a ‘guardian coup’¹ – the military announcement about dealing with corrupt elements around […]

Let’s talk about neo-colonialism in Africa

In this article, Mark Langan of Newcastle University re-engages the concept of ‘neo-colonialism’ to make sense of the ongoing cycle of poverty in Africa and the failure of development.

 

Neo-colonialism has wrongly lost currency as a concept for examining African ‘development’. This is reflective of university environments in which politer debate about global value chains or the misrule of the ‘Big […]

Book Review: Julius Nyerere by Paul Bjerk

In a short and precise volume, Paul Bjerk succeeds in debating the legacy of Nyerere in six short chapters. The book deals with the highs and lows of Nyerere’s illustrious political career and balances this in a manner befitting a great African statesman, says Nicodemus Minde.

 

Paul Bjerk has taken keen interest in the study of Tanzania’s postcolonial history and […]

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Photo credit: Jeff Attaway via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2g428Fr)CC BY 2.0 )
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    Book Review- Learning from the curse: Sembene’s Xala by Richard Fardon and Senga la Rouge

Book Review- Learning from the curse: Sembene’s Xala by Richard Fardon and Senga la Rouge

Dagna Rams highlights the many uses of ‘Learning from the curse’: a fun and off-beat reportage of the place and the time, a film club companion for solitary viewers, and also a book to admire visually.

 

Directed by Ousamane Sembene, former Senegalese dock worker, who in his 30s turned to writing books and then expanded to film in order to […]

Jomo Kenyatta, LSE and the independence of Kenya

To commemorate Black History Month, Alex Free profiles Jomo Kenyatta – the first president of Kenya and an LSE graduate who came to London and studied social anthropology under Bronisław Malinowski in the 1930s. A leading pan-Africanist with an ultimately mixed political legacy in office, Kenyatta produced his famous ethnographic study of the Kikuyu, Facing Mount Kenya, while at LSE.

Jomo Kenyatta is a […]

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