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  • Permalink This mural in Bow, East London commemorates the life and work of Sylvia Pankhurst 
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    Why the Pankhurst Name is Synonymous with Ethiopia as well as the Suffragette Movement

Why the Pankhurst Name is Synonymous with Ethiopia as well as the Suffragette Movement

LSE’s Behailu Shiferaw Mihirete tells the story of Sylvia Pankhurst, daughter of prominent suffragette Emmeline, who became a relentless advocate for Ethiopia during the Fascist Italian invasion of 1936 to 1941.

The year 2018 marks the centenary of the year when some women (who met the age (>30 years old) and property criteria or who were university educated) succeeded in […]

Family politics and female authority in Sierra Leone

In Freetown, Sierra Leone, electoral politics is not the dominant form of politics. Jonah Lipton sheds light on the significance of family politics and the prominence of women in these decision-making processes.

 This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

 

In March of this year general elections were held in […]

SexYZ: Writing our own Sex Education narrative

Emily van der Merwe introduces SexYZ, winner of the 2017/18 PfAL social campaign. In this launch blog post, she discusses the team plans to use visual learning and animation to increase the impact of the campaign.

Think of a video that you watched that changed your worldview, or even changed your life. (For me it was The Lion King, and […]

Jomo Kenyatta, LSE and the independence of Kenya

To commemorate Black History Month, Alex Free profiles Jomo Kenyatta – the first president of Kenya and an LSE graduate who came to London and studied social anthropology under Bronisław Malinowski in the 1930s. A leading pan-Africanist with an ultimately mixed political legacy in office, Kenyatta produced his famous ethnographic study of the Kikuyu, Facing Mount Kenya, while at LSE.

Jomo Kenyatta is a […]

Calling all LSE blogs authors – we need your help!

Here at the LSE blogs, we’re always eager to follow up on our published posts and track the impacts that they have; whether this is mainstream media coverage, inclusion on a university course reading list, references in grey literature or in policy documentation. Much of this can be captured by link-tracking but there are inevitably cases we can’t pick […]

February 2nd, 2017|LSE, Research Methods|0 Comments|

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Blog Posts of 2016

It is that time of the year when we stop to take stock of the last 12 months and we are happy to present the best-read @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2016, as voted by you with your clicks. If you missed any of these, here is your opportunity to catch up!

Gambia continues to defy existing political norms on the […]

Eslanda Robeson – acting, activism, Africa and LSE

Following her review of Paul Robeson: the artist as revolutionary by Gerald Horne at the LSE Review of Books, Sherese R Taylor introduces the life of Eslanda Robeson, who studied at LSE in the 1930s.

Eslanda Cordozo Goode Robeson, also known as Essie, was an anti-racist, anti-colonialist, anti-capitalist, and feminist born in Washington, DC on 15 December 1895. She received a scholarship from […]

We need to know more about Africa

Professor Tim Allen, inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa made possible through a generous gift from Firoz Lalji through the Lalji Family Foundation, highlights the inadequate amount of rigorous and independent research being done on Africa and calls for institutions in the Global North to increase their engagement with African scholarship, including with African researchers working in […]

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    Reading List: Ten blog posts to revisit on the fifth anniversary of the launch of the Africa at LSE blog

Reading List: Ten blog posts to revisit on the fifth anniversary of the launch of the Africa at LSE blog

June 6 2016 marks five years since the Africa at LSE blog was launched. To commemorate the occasion, we have produced of a reading list of 10 blog posts you may like to read again. It is an eclectic mix of articles that have been very popular with our readers.

Africa’s urban transition: challenges, misconceptions and opportunities – Sean Fox, […]

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    ‘Thinking Across Borders’ course fosters exchange between African and Western political thought

‘Thinking Across Borders’ course fosters exchange between African and Western political thought

On 17 and 18 February 2016 the Department of Government hosted ‘Thinking Across Borders’, a mini-course on Modern African Political Theory led by Dr Martin Odei Ajei, from the University of Ghana. Katrin Flikschuh and Paula Romero tell us about the key themes and debates from two days of engaging discussion.

Comparing African and Western concepts of ‘self’

During Lent term […]

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