All events listed below are free and open to all with no ticket required unless otherwise stated. Entry is on a first come first served basis.

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Michaelmas Term 2014

EXHIBITION: South Africa’s Democracy — Mandela’s “Cherished Ideal”

LSE Arts public exhibition

Date: Monday 1 – Friday 26 September 2014
Time:  10am- 8pm, Mon-Fri
Venue: Atrium Gallery, Old Building

This exhibition brings together photographs, documents and artefacts illustrating the unique story of South Africa’s journey into democracy — President Mandela’s “cherished ideal”.

It marks the twentieth year of the new country and the fiftieth year since Mandela and his co-accused were sentenced to life imprisonment at the Rivonia Trial.  For further details on the exhibition please visit: South Africa’s Democracy — Mandela’s “Cherished Ideal”

This exhibition is presented by the University of Cape Town, Witwatersrand and Fort Hareand and supported by the South African High Commission.

Moeletsi Mbeki, South African author and businessman, and deputy chair of the South African Institute of International Affairs, will give an associated lecture on Tuesday 23 September.  For more information please see South Africa’s Democracy — Mandela’s “Cherished Ideal”

This exhibition is open to all, no ticket required.


 

South Africa’s Democracy — Mandela’s “Cherished Ideal”

LSE public lecture

Date: Tuesday 23 September 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Moeletsi Mbeki
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

Moeletsi Mbeki, political analyst, author and entrepreneur, will examine how close his country has come, in the two decades since its first free elections, to the “cherished ideal” of democracy envisaged by President Mandela and those, like Mr Mbeki’s father, who were jailed for life alongside him.

Moeletsi Mbeki is the author of Architects of Poverty: Why African Capitalism Needs Changing. He recently edited Advocates for Change: How to Overcome Africa’s Challenges. Both books have been translated into Chinese. He is Deputy Chairman of the South African Institute for International Affairs.

This event is associated with the exhibition South Africa’s Democracy — Mandela’s “Cherished Ideal”

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSESA

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required.


Financing Africa’s future: infrastructure, investment and opportunity

International Growth Centre public lecture

Date: Tuesday 23 September 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Donald Kaberuka
Discussant: Professor Sir Paul Collier
Chair: Dr Jonathan Leape

Low investment in infrastructure is a critical constraint on economic growth in Africa. Dr Kaberuka will assess the challenges and offer his views on the way forward.

Donald Kaberuka (@DonaldKaberuka) is the President of the African Development Bank (AfDB).

Paul Collier is a director of the International Growth Centre (IGC), professor of economics and public policy at the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University and co-director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies also at Oxford University.

Jonathan Leape is Associate Professor of Economics at LSE and Executive Director of the International Growth Centre.

This public lecture is part of Growth Week 2014 which takes place at LSE from 23-25 September organised by the International Growth Centre. There will be two further public events, one of the evening of 24 September (Ten Facts about Energy and Growth), the other on the evening of 25 September (Growth, Policy and Institutions: lessons from the Indian experience).

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #GrowthWeek

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required.


Formality Bias: the habits holding Africa back

LSE public lecture

Date: Friday 26 September 2014
Time: 1-2pm
Venue: Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Dayo Olopade

Dayo Olopade, Nigerian-American journalist and author, will expose the global pretensions that have stymied African development, and explore the ingenious workarounds that are driving regional progress. Olopade will share case studies in innovation, drawn from her reporting across 17 African countries—moving beyond the dire headlines and toward a realistic, constructive assessment of modern Africa.

Dayo Olopade (@madayo) is the author of The Bright Continent: Breaking Rules and Making change in Modern Africa.

Follow this link to find out more


Human Rights Diplomacy: inside the United Nations

Centre for the Study of Human Rights public lecture

Date: Thursday 2 October 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Dr Ibrahim Salama
Chair: Dr Margot Salomon

What is human rights diplomacy? How does the link among codification, advocacy and implementation of human rights norms really play out?

Ibrahim Salama (@UNrightswire) is director of the Human Rights Treaties Division in the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Margot Salomon is Acting Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

Follow this link to find out more about this event


 

Improving Basic Services for the Bottom Forty Percent: lessons from Ethiopia

Department of International Development public discussion

Date: Wednesday 8 October 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Dr Qaiser Khan
Discussants: Marta Foresti, Peter Hawkins, Dr Andy Norton
Chair: Professor Jean-Paul Faguet

Dr Qaiser Khan will be joined by a panel to discuss Improving Basic Services for the Bottom Forty Percent: Lessons from Ethiopia, which examines Ethiopia’s model in delivering basic services and why it appears to be succeeding.

Qaiser Khan is a lead economist and program leader at the World Bank and the co-author of Improving Basic Services for the Bottom Forty Percent: Lessons from Ethiopia.

Marta Foresti is Director of Politics and Governance Programme at the ODI.

Peter Hawkins is Head of Profession for Programme Management at DFID.

Andy Norton is Director for Research at the ODI.

Follow the link to find out more about this event


 

Women in Public Life: above the parapet

Institute of Public Affairs public lecture

Date: Wednesday 15 October 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Dr Joyce Banda

Joyce Banda will reflect on her journey to the highest level of public life. This event launches a new Institute of Public Affairs project exploring the roads taken by women who shape public life.

Joyce Banda was the first female President of Malawi (2012 – 2014) and only the second woman to lead a country in Africa.

Follow this link to find out more about this event


 

Art & Activism: reflections on the anti-apartheid struggle & two decades of South African democracy

2014 Steve Biko Memorial Lecture

Date: Thursday 23 October 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker: Hugh Masekela

Hugh Masekela has long spoken out about South Africa’s struggle for civil rights. His talk will be about arts & activism, reflecting on the role that he and other artists, particularly those in exile, played in the anti-apartheid movement.

Hugh Masekela is a world-renowned flugelhornist, trumpeter, bandleader, composer, singer and defiant political voice. With a career that spans over 5 decades, Masekela remains a driving cultural force at home and abroad, as well as an advocate for justice and equality globally.

The Steve Biko Memorial Lecture, Europe, a partnership between LSE and the Steve Biko Foundation, is a platform for African thought leaders, policy makers and activists and  to reflect on  the past, present and future of Africa.

Follow this link to find out more about this event


Ebola, Peace and Security

Date: Monday 10 November 2014
Time: 7.30-8.30pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker: Karin Landgren, Special Representative of the Secretary-General to Liberia

Suggested Twitter hashtag: #LSEEbola   

Ebola may not be a weapon but this disease threatens peace and security. To date, the total number of reported cases of Ebola exceeds 10,000, with over half of the reported cases occurring in Liberia.

Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) Karin Landgren has run the UN peacekeeping operation in Liberia since mid-2012, with over 8,000 personnel including troops, police and civilians.

Addressing the UN Security Council on 9th September 2014, Landgren said that Liberia faced its gravest crisis since the civil war, which ended in 2003. She pointed to a lack of confidence in the Government’s capacity to address the crisis, unstable political dynamics and deep economic uncertainty, noting that, “The enormous task of addressing Ebola has revealed persistent and profound institutional weaknesses, including in the security sector.”

Can Ebola undo a decade of investment in Liberia’s stability? In this public event Karin Landgren will discuss the threats posed by the Ebola crisis including to peace and security.

Find out more about this event

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From Transformational Leadership to Mafia State? Observations from South Africa’s Two Decades of Democracy

 

LSE IDEAS public lecture

Date: Tuesday 25 November 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Thai Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Dr Mzukisi Qobo
Chair:  Professor Chris Alden

Widely considered to be Africa’s oldest liberation movement, the African National Congress (ANC) played a historic role in ending apartheid in South Africa and has been the country’s ruling political party since 1994. More recently, however, the ANC’s legacy has been tarnished by allegations of corruption and inefficiency. Dr Mzukisi Qobo will discuss his view that political governance in South Africa has collapsed, and explore the possibilities of the country’s political future.

Dr Mzukisi Qobo teaches international political economy at the University of Pretoria, and is deputy director at the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation. He is co-author of The Fall of the ANC: What Next?.

Chris Alden is a Professor in International Relations at the LSE and Head of the Africa International Affairs programme at LSE IDEAS.

LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is a centre for the study of international affairs, diplomacy and grand strategy.

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The Languages of Migration

LSE and Migration Museum Project public lecture

Date: Wednesday 26 November 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor Michael Rosen

Language is central to our understanding of migration: on the one hand, migrants bring languages with them and, on the other, the countries they arrive in develop a special language to describe migrants. Michael Rosen will explore the ways in which these two aspects meet, partly by looking at his own background, partly by looking at his experience in education over the last 40 years.

Michael Rosen (@MichaelRosenYes) was born in 1946 in north-west London. His mother was born in London, his father in Brockton, Mass. USA. All their grandparents were migrants – mostly from Poland but also from what is now Romania. He is a former Children’s Laureate and the present Professor of Children’s Literature at Goldsmiths, University of London.

The Migration Museum Project plans to create the UK’s first dedicated Migration Museum, to tell the story of movement into and out of the UK in a fresh and engaging way. The museum will be an enquiry into who we are, where we came from and where we are going. Britons at home and abroad have a shared cultural history and an exciting future. We aim to represent the thrilling tales, the emotion and the history that have gone into shaping our national fabric; we aim to be the museum of all our stories.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEMMP

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.

Find out more about this event

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Democracy and the Nigerian Factor:  The Trouble with the Nigerian People

Africa Talks Public Event

Date: Thursday 4 December 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Thai Lecture Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Pius Adesanmi

Nigeria’s next presidential election, scheduled for February 14, 2015, will be more significant than all the preceding presidential elections since the return to “democracy” in 1999. Internal and external challenges are pointing to 2015 as the year of Nigeria’s apocalypse. Can the internal contradictions of Nigerian political culture, based on mutual contempt between officials and society, be engaged as an indigenous impetus for democracy? This lecture will examine the various manifestations of the paradox of Nigerian political life and analyze its implications for 2015.

Pius Adesanmi is a professor of literature and African studies at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. He is the author of “You’re Not a Country, Africa” which won the 2010 Penguine Prize for African Writing, and is a prodigious commentator on public affairs in Nigeria and beyond.

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Lent Term 2015

 

Shifting African digital landscapes

LSE Africa Talks Public Lecture

Date: Tuesday 17 March 2015
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: New Theatre, East Building
Speaker: Dr Sean Jacobs, The New School
Chair: Dr Wendy Willems, Department of Media and Communications, LSE

Developments and changes to the online media sphere point to interesting possibilities for how Africans are engaging in the global public sphere. Whether via irreverent Youtube prank videos, blogs, Instagram, song remixes, or producing independent online media (such as the Nigerian-focused Sahara Reporters), among others, and addressing topics such as homosexuality, gender relations, economic relations, African subjects are taking their place more and more as audiences and agents, rather than as receivers of aid and information.

Sean Jacobs is on the faculty of The New School in New York City and the founder of the popular Africa is a Country blog (http://africasacountry.com/). He holds a PhD in Politics from Birkbeck College, University of London. His research focuses on the relationship between politics and popular culture. He is an editorial board member of the Journal of African Media Studies and African Journalism Studies. A former Fulbright and Commonwealth Scholar, he has held fellowships at The New School, Harvard University and New York University. Jacobs was born in Cape Town, South Africa, and spent his formative years under Apartheid.