Aid

  • Permalink A series of aid billboard along the roadside in Rutana, Burundi in June 2018
Image Credit: Astrid JamarGallery

    Mind the Billboards: International Aid Conquering the Public Space in Burundi

Mind the Billboards: International Aid Conquering the Public Space in Burundi

This two-part blog series will examine the prominence of aid billboards in Burundi and analyse how these billboards produce colonial continuities, which in turn shape the public space and public authority in Burundi. In the first article, Astrid Jamar discusses how these billboards and their colonial nature dominate the public space. Along with symbols of the regime, their physical […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Seeing and Being Development’s ‘Other’: Representations of Africa and Diaspora Audiences

Dr Edward Ademolu outlines how his interest in the politics of visual representation particular in the development/humanitarian spheres evolved.

As a young child in the 1990s my introduction to international development was through watching the performative biennial telethon ‘Red Nose Day’ of Comic Relief, a major UK charity. This high-profile event armed with prosthetic noses, mainstream contemporary music, and […]

Japan and the African Challenge

Although Japan was the first country to launch a forum on African development, the East Asian giant’s Africa engagement is now lagging behind some of its fellow Asian powers, argues Anne-Léonore Dardenne.

Over the last decade, Africa has undergone a substantial transformation and has attracted the attention of major Asian powers such as China, India, Japan and more recently South Korea. […]

Book Review – Why We Lie About Aid by Pablo Yanguas

According to Thomas Kirk, this book is an engaging rallying cry to reinterpret our discourses around aid and move away from quantifying successes based solely on value for money.

Every so often you read something that brilliantly articulates an idea or issue you have been struggling with for a while but could not eloquently capture. For me, Why We Lie About Aid […]

The Cautious Return of Import Substitution in Africa

As import substitution becomes fashionable again in some African countries, LSE’s Pritish Behuria analyses how successfully this policy can be implemented given the evolving aid and investment landscape.

The international development industry is currently experiencing turbulence and uncertainty. Donald Trump’s victory in the United States elections and the rise of populist politics elsewhere in Europe may contribute to changes in […]

Film Review: N.G.O. – Nothing Going On

Simone Datzberger interviews Arnold Aganze whose latest film serves as a stern critique of how NGOs operate in African countries.

“Colonialism was easier to fight than the massive industry of NGOs in Africa.” says Arnold Aganze, a Congolese writer and director of his latest movie: N.G.O. – Nothing Going On. The movie starts off as a light story about how […]

  • Permalink Main street, Paoua, north west Central African Republic (CAR)
Credit: DFID / Simon Davis via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1QpGWXb) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Welcome to our look back to our most popular book reviews of 2016.

Book Review – Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia: Monarchy, Revolution and the Legacy of Meles Zenawi Edited by Gérard Prunier and Éloi Ficquet – An impressive volume, one which contains a wealth of information on the historical, cultural and religious underpinnings of the landlocked country in the Horn of Africa, […]

  • Permalink Gulu in Northern Uganda Photo Credit: Fiona Graham / WorldRemit via Flickr (http://bit.ly/21v4Zpp) CC BY-SA 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: Aid and Authoritarianism in Africa: Development without Democracy Edited by Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens

Book Review: Aid and Authoritarianism in Africa: Development without Democracy Edited by Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens

This is a wide-ranging volume which examines the intersection between the aid industry and African politics from a variety of perspectives. It should provoke new thinking among both academics and practitioners, says Nick Branson.

Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens seek to explore the “motives, dynamics and consequences of international aid given to authoritarian African governments”. The editors present donors’ […]

  • Permalink eople queuing to access the transit camp in Dolo Ado in 2011 Photo Credit: Cate Turton/Department for International Development via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2ceJTgA) CC BY 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures, 2011 – 12 by Daniel Maxwell and Nisar Majid

Book Review: Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures, 2011 – 12 by Daniel Maxwell and Nisar Majid

LSE’s Richard Stupart says Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures, 2011 – 12 by Daniel Maxwell and Nisar Majid is an excellent volume that should be mandatory reading for researchers, practising humanitarians, or policy makers interested in understanding better what went into the making of and response to a ‘complex humanitarian emergency’ in Somalia.

 

This year marked the fifth […]

Why Bill Gates’ chickens will not end African poverty

Joseph Hanlon and Teresa Smart are unimpressed by a new initiative, but disappointingly avoid all the potential excruciating puns.

Bill Gates announced on 7 June that he is giving 100,000 chickens to the poor because chickens are “easy to take care of” and a woman with just five hens in Africa can make $1000 per year. For Mozambique where we […]

Bad Behavior has blocked 2770 access attempts in the last 7 days.