Angola

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    Book Review: The Petro Developmental State in Africa: Making Oil Work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea by Jesse Salah Ovadia

Book Review: The Petro Developmental State in Africa: Making Oil Work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea by Jesse Salah Ovadia

Ed Reed reviews Jesse Salah Ovadia’s The Petro-Developmental State in Africa: Making Oil Work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea which takes an innovative approach to the question of how local content policies work in Angola.

In development literature, oil production has often been seen as a problem to be handled, rather than an opportunity to be seized. […]

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    Book Review: Aid and Authoritarianism in Africa: Development without Democracy Edited by Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens

Book Review: Aid and Authoritarianism in Africa: Development without Democracy Edited by Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens

This is a wide-ranging volume which examines the intersection between the aid industry and African politics from a variety of perspectives. It should provoke new thinking among both academics and practitioners, says Nick Branson.

Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens seek to explore the “motives, dynamics and consequences of international aid given to authoritarian African governments”. The editors present donors’ […]

  • Permalink Queen Nzinga is one of the most famous rulers in 17th century Angola 
Photo Credit: Carlos Guderian via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2bmaNQC) CC BY-NC-SA 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: A Short History of Modern Angola by David Birmingham

Book Review: A Short History of Modern Angola by David Birmingham

Yovanka Perdigao says that David Birmingham’s latest book is an excellent guide to those seeking an introduction to Angola’s history.

 

Angola has made the international headlines numerous times, whether through its abundant resources to more recent human rights violations and corruption scandals along with the Dos Santos family’ strong grip. However the country remains a mystery to the Anglophone world […]

Africa at LSE blog – Most Popular Book Reviews of 2015

Reviews of academic books feature on the blog on Fridays, we have compiled a list of the best read book reviews of 2015.
10. Women and the Informal Economy in Urban Africa – From the Margins to the Centre by Mary Njeri Kinyanyjui – Rochelle Burgess said that this book could be a landmark publication in changing perceptions of how development […]

  • Permalink Image Credit: Tawakkul Karman, Leymah Gbowee and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf display their awards during the presentation of the Nobel Peace Prize, 10 December 2011 (Harry Wad)Gallery

    Book Review: Women and Power in Postconflict Africa by Aili Mari Tripp

Book Review: Women and Power in Postconflict Africa by Aili Mari Tripp

In Women and Power in Postconflict Africa, Aili Mari Tripp provocatively argues that major conflict can have disruptive, egalitarian effects, catalysing women’s increased legislative representation. She demonstrates how conflict has often pushed women into socially valued domains, where they demonstrate their equal abilities and thereby undermine prevailing gender ideologies. Alice Evans explores the theoretical insights of this important scholarship, arguing […]

Oil prices are spoiling Angola’s independence anniversary

Rebecca Engebretsen analyses what has gone wrong with Angola’s economy and how it can be fixed.

As Oxford’s Ricardo Soares de Oliveira also discussed in a recent blog post, not all is well with Angola’s oil-reliant economy. After petroleum prices started to drop last year, the country’s remarkable economic growth over the last few years came almost to a standstill. Macroeconomic improvements, applauded […]

November 25th, 2015|Featured, Resources|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Magnificent and Beggar Land: Angola since the Civil War by Ricardo Soares de Oliveira

Book Review: Magnificent and Beggar Land: Angola since the Civil War by Ricardo Soares de Oliveira

Nick Branson praises Ricardo Soares de Oliveira’s Magnificent and Beggar Land: Angola since the Civil War as “perhaps the finest account of contemporary Angola available in English”.

This is the second monograph by Oxford lecturer in African politics, Ricardo Soares de Oliveira, but his first dedicated exclusively to Angola. Published forty years after the start of the civil war, […]

  • Permalink Daniel Chipenda, left, pictured on a trip to Lisbon in 1981, was part Angola's struggle against colonialismGallery

    Christian Missions and the Emergence of Nationalism in Angola

Christian Missions and the Emergence of Nationalism in Angola

LSE’s Iracema Dulley examines the links between Christian missions and the rise of liberation leaders in Africa. Read in Portuguese

In sub-Saharan Africa, many of the leaders who took part in the anti-colonial liberation struggle and the administration of post-colonial African nations were educated in Christian missions. A concise list of such people would include actors such as Nelson Mandela, […]

  • Permalink Daniel Chipenda, left, pictured on a trip to Lisbon in 1981, was part Angola's struggle against colonialismGallery

    As missões cristãs e o surgimento do nacionalismo em Angola

As missões cristãs e o surgimento do nacionalismo em Angola

Iracema Dulley da LSE examina as ligações entre as missões cristãs e a ascensão dos líderes dos movimentos de libertação na África. Read in English

Na África subsariana, muitos dos líderes que participaram na luta de libertação anti-colonial e na administração dos países africanos pós-coloniais foram educados em missões cristãs. Uma lista concisa destas pessoas inclui indivíduos tais como Nelson […]

Book Review: In the name of the people: Angola’s forgotten Massacre by Lara Pawson

Rochelle Burgess praises Lara Pawson’s In the Name of the People: Angola’s forgotten Massacre for embracing a “multiplicity of truths”. Angola’s post-colonial history is marked by a particular brand of suffering. It has housed one of the world’s longest civil wars, responsible for the death of more than 300,000 people and one of the worst humanitarian crises in modern history. Angola’s struggles […]

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