Conflict

Revisiting ‘justice’ in northern Uganda #LSEreturn

Two studies in the current issue of the Journal of Eastern African Studies re-visit the fascinating debate about justice and reconciliation in northern Uganda, nearly ten years since the fighting between the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the Government of Uganda (GoU) stopped on Ugandan soil, as Anna Macdonald, Holly Porter and Letha Victor discuss in this article.

This […]

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews 2017

Here at the Africa at LSE blog, we love bringing to the attention of the public books about Africa. As the year draws to an end, here are our most popular book reviews of 2017. Some great reviews and books haven’t made this list, do visit the book reviews section of our blog to discover more.

The Root Causes […]

  • Permalink South Sudanese children rehearse a dance routine to be performed at half-time during South Sudan’s national football team match with Kenya as part of the Independence Day celebrations. (Photo: Paul Banks, United Nations)Gallery

    When Success Becomes a Burden: Challenges of Nations Building in Post-Liberation South Sudan

When Success Becomes a Burden: Challenges of Nations Building in Post-Liberation South Sudan

LSE Alumnus Jacob D. Chol explores how the struggle for South Sudanese independence has become a burden to its citizens.

On 9th July 2011, the world celebrated the ushering in of a nascent State, the Republic of South Sudan. Many commentators argued South Sudan was a “destined to fail State”. The liberators, now turned-leaders of this the new Republic, quickly […]

December 6th, 2017|Conflict, Featured, Society|0 Comments|
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    Obstacles to Peacebuilding: The Failure of Foreign Intervention in War-Torn Countries

Obstacles to Peacebuilding: The Failure of Foreign Intervention in War-Torn Countries

Graciana del Castillo discusses the importance of economic reconstruction in the war-to-peace transition.

Almost three decades have passed since Cold War-related confrontations ended and a diverse group of countries, at low levels of development, came out of war or other civil conflict—either through peace negotiations, military interventions or national uprisings for regime change—and embarked in multi-pronged transitions to peace, stability, […]

October 18th, 2017|Conflict, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Photo Essay: Seeing Displacement through Ethnographic Photography #LSEreturn

Photo Essay: Seeing Displacement through Ethnographic Photography #LSEreturn

Visual and written narratives about conflict and victimhood tend to generate a series of much-repeated tropes. In this article, LSE’s Elizabeth Storer unveils a project which seeks to present a more accurate portrayal of displacement through the medium of photography.

 

This article is part of our Politics of Return series, an AHRC/ESRC PaCCs-funded project which explores the dynamics of return […]

The Politics of Return: An agenda for research #LSEreturn

As the AHRC-ESRC PaCCs-funded Politics of Return series is launched, Professor Tim Allen and Dr Anna Macdonald discuss why it is more important than ever to investigate the dynamics of return and reintegration in Central and Eastern Africa.

This article is part of our Politics of Return series, an AHRC/ESRC PaCCs-funded project which explores the dynamics of return and reintegration […]

Understanding the Complexity of Fragmented Justice in DRC

Dr José Bazonzi talks to JSRP Research Manager Henry Radice about his recent research, and the current research environment in DRC.

 

You focus in your work on the notion of fragmented justice. What do you mean by this?

When we look at justice provision in the area I work on, Muanda in Kongo Central, there really is a multiplicity of actors […]

  • Permalink St Andrews, African Inland Church compound, Caigon Boma, Pajok (Photo: Ryan O’Byrne)Gallery

    Why Understanding Public Authority in Fragile and Conflict Settings Matters for International Development

Why Understanding Public Authority in Fragile and Conflict Settings Matters for International Development

What is Public authority? And why does it matter that we understand it? Duncan Green discusses the hypothesis behind the new ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development.

 

Thomas Hobbes argued that states are essential to guarantee security. In their absence there would be a ‘war of all against all’ in which life would be ‘solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, […]

  • Permalink Road between Bujumbura and Gitega

Photo credit: Dave Proffer via Flickr(http://bit.ly/2kEFTtC) CC BY 2.0
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    Book review – Burundi: The Biography of a Small African Country by Nigel Watt

Book review – Burundi: The Biography of a Small African Country by Nigel Watt

LSE’s Richard Stupart recommends this book to anyone wanting an introduction to the major themes in Burundian politics and history, or an overview of the kinds of organisations involved in conflict resolution, democracy building and development.

To say that Burundi is ignored in the fields of development, political science, and other endeavours focused on Africa is to state the obvious. […]

  • Permalink Main street, Paoua, north west Central African Republic (CAR)
Credit: DFID / Simon Davis via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1QpGWXb) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Welcome to our look back to our most popular book reviews of 2016.

Book Review – Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia: Monarchy, Revolution and the Legacy of Meles Zenawi Edited by Gérard Prunier and Éloi Ficquet – An impressive volume, one which contains a wealth of information on the historical, cultural and religious underpinnings of the landlocked country in the Horn of Africa, […]

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