Democracy

  • Permalink Maputo, Mozambique.

Photo credit: World Bank Photo Collection via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2mY4yq7) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Book review – The Rise of Africa’s Middle Class: Myths, Realities and Critical Engagements, by Henning Melber(ed.)

Book review – The Rise of Africa’s Middle Class: Myths, Realities and Critical Engagements, by Henning Melber(ed.)

The Rise of Africa’s Middle Class: Myths, Realities and Critical Engagements seeks to wrestle back the African middle class debate from the Afro-optimists with mixed success, according to LSE’s Rebecca Simson.

 

Over the last few years a flurry of reports and articles by international organisations, private firms and the media have celebrated the growth of Africa’s middle class. Many predict […]

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    Book review: The Despot’s Accomplice: How the West is Aiding and Abetting the Decline of Democracy by Brian Klaas

Book review: The Despot’s Accomplice: How the West is Aiding and Abetting the Decline of Democracy by Brian Klaas

Jason Sumich describes The Despot’s Accomplice: How the West is Aiding and Abetting the Decline of Democracy by Brian Klaas as a well-written and engaging volume around the author’s vision of democracy although it would have benefitted from a serious engagement with differing opinions.

It has become increasingly common to speak of liberal democracy as a system in crisis whose […]

  • Permalink A young Seretse Khama who would later become the first President of BotswanaGallery

    Reading List: @AfricaAtLSE Blog Posts of the Year – Editor’s Cut

Reading List: @AfricaAtLSE Blog Posts of the Year – Editor’s Cut

You may have already have seen our Most Popular Blog Posts of the Year, so you may be wondering what this is about. Well, this is to capture notable articles which did not make it into the Top 10, but stood out in other ways. This could be the way they resonated with their readers or how aptly they […]

  • Permalink Campaign posters from the 2006 elections in DRC which are widely regarded as fair and representative
Photo Credit: Tomas via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2gDoi2d) CC BY-NC 2.0Gallery

    #DRCongo: where a decade of failed democracy has exposed the electoral fallacy

#DRCongo: where a decade of failed democracy has exposed the electoral fallacy

Dr Suda Perera argues that the current political crisis in DR Congo demonstrates that the idea that a fairly-won election is necessary to create a certain and solid basis for democratic state-building is faulty.

This article is part of our African Elections series.

In 2006, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) held its first multi-party democratic elections in over 40 years after […]

  • Permalink Photo Credit: David Stanley via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2eUjEcV) CC BY 2.0Gallery

    From Democracy Promotion to ‘Politically Smart’ Governance Reform in Africa

From Democracy Promotion to ‘Politically Smart’ Governance Reform in Africa

Rosie Pinnington provides an important critique of the ‘politically smart’ governance reform that is being adopted by increasing numbers of donors.

In Western development assistance to Africa, there has been a growing shift away from the promotion of liberal democracy towards what is contextually and politically ‘feasible’. This shift has been prompted by a number of factors. First and foremost, […]

  • Permalink Gulu in Northern Uganda Photo Credit: Fiona Graham / WorldRemit via Flickr (http://bit.ly/21v4Zpp) CC BY-SA 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: Aid and Authoritarianism in Africa: Development without Democracy Edited by Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens

Book Review: Aid and Authoritarianism in Africa: Development without Democracy Edited by Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens

This is a wide-ranging volume which examines the intersection between the aid industry and African politics from a variety of perspectives. It should provoke new thinking among both academics and practitioners, says Nick Branson.

Tobias Hagmann and Filip Reyntjens seek to explore the “motives, dynamics and consequences of international aid given to authoritarian African governments”. The editors present donors’ […]

  • Permalink South Africa after 1994 has remained a society in which the majority of its citizens simply do not count as such – in the sense that they are not entitled to act politically. Gallery

    Book Review: South Africa’s Insurgent Citizens: On Dissent and the Possibility of Politics by Julian Brown

Book Review: South Africa’s Insurgent Citizens: On Dissent and the Possibility of Politics by Julian Brown

Richard Stupart praises the book South Africa’s Insurgent Citizens as an “ exciting contribution for those looking for new ways of considering the question of ‘insurgent citizens.’”

When talking about contemporary South African politics, it has become almost cliché to point to the instability of the country’s current political-economic structure. A combination of staggering inequality, mass unemployment, high levels of […]

Democracy in Africa: Lessons from Malawi

What are the key lessons that the Malawian elections of 2014 can offer for those studying democracy and democratisation? In the wake of their latest edited book, Nandini Patel and Michael Wahman explain.

Our new edited volume, The Malawi 2014 Tripartite Elections: Is Democracy Maturing?, was just published and is available in a free soft copy here. The volume brings together some […]

Africa at LSE blog – Most Popular Book Reviews of 2015

Reviews of academic books feature on the blog on Fridays, we have compiled a list of the best read book reviews of 2015.
10. Women and the Informal Economy in Urban Africa – From the Margins to the Centre by Mary Njeri Kinyanyjui – Rochelle Burgess said that this book could be a landmark publication in changing perceptions of how development […]

  • Permalink A polling station near Bolgatanga in Northern Ghana Credit: Elleen Delhl via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1jYdGt2)  CC BY-NC-SA 2.0Gallery

    Dialling democracy: mobile phones and political participation in Ghana

Dialling democracy: mobile phones and political participation in Ghana

Following the extraordinary rise of mobile phone use in Ghana over the last decade, LSE alumnus Andrew Small examines its potential impact on democracy in the West African country.

In November 2012, weeks before their country’s general election, Ghanaians began to receive text messages from a familiar, but unexpected name.

“My Dear Friend”, one read. “[Our] Govt has distributed over 3 […]

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