Development

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    Who cares about Africa? British and American conservatisms in African development

Who cares about Africa? British and American conservatisms in African development

Stefan Andreasson examines how the Republican and Conservative parties dealt with African development since the late Cold War era. He explains why American input has been more prominent, while the British have come to resign themselves to a managed decline in relations with Africa.

 
Who cares about Africa? Does political ideology inform whether or not such care exists and how it is […]

Reading List: Most popular @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2017

It is that time of the year when we stop to take stock of the last 12 months and we are happy to present the best-read @AfricaAtLSE blog posts of 2016, as voted by you with your clicks. If you missed any of these, here is your opportunity to catch up!

Film Review: NGO – Nothing Going On -LSE […]

Decolonising Development Studies

Tin Hinane El Kadi explores the debates and questions around decolonising development studies.

 

Global calls for decolonisation in higher education have spread over recent years. The Rhodes Must Fall campaign has called for statues of the imperialist Cecil Rhodes to be torn down at the University of Cape Town in South Africa and the University of Oxford in the UK. This decolonisation initiative […]

  • Permalink Mark Zuckerberg visits the CoCreation Hub in Yaba, Lagos in 2016
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    An Open Letter to Mark Zuckerberg: Africa deserves more from your IT initiatives

An Open Letter to Mark Zuckerberg: Africa deserves more from your IT initiatives

LSE’s Kristen Hagemeister urges the Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg to rethink his current initiatives on the African continent to ensure they result in real transformational change.

 

Dear Mr Zuckerberg,

Your motivation to invest in Africa’s ICT industry is commendable and in your recent visits to Nigeria and Kenya, you stated your intention to listen, learn, and understand the challenges facing African […]

The Cautious Return of Import Substitution in Africa

As import substitution becomes fashionable again in some African countries, LSE’s Pritish Behuria analyses how successfully this policy can be implemented given the evolving aid and investment landscape.

The international development industry is currently experiencing turbulence and uncertainty. Donald Trump’s victory in the United States elections and the rise of populist politics elsewhere in Europe may contribute to changes in […]

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    Why Understanding Public Authority in Fragile and Conflict Settings Matters for International Development

Why Understanding Public Authority in Fragile and Conflict Settings Matters for International Development

What is Public authority? And why does it matter that we understand it? Duncan Green discusses the hypothesis behind the new ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development.

 

Thomas Hobbes argued that states are essential to guarantee security. In their absence there would be a ‘war of all against all’ in which life would be ‘solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, […]

Book Review: Cotton by Adam Sneyd

In Cotton, Adam Sneyd brings the reality of international trade into focus through tracing the local and global politics behind the circulation of one of the most everyday of materials: cotton. This is a vividly told, interrogative read that establishes its author as a leading expert on the politics of commodities and development, finds Dr Milasoa Chérel-Robson.
The cover of Cotton by Adam Sneyd is […]

Film Review: N.G.O. – Nothing Going On

Simone Datzberger interviews Arnold Aganze whose latest film serves as a stern critique of how NGOs operate in African countries.

“Colonialism was easier to fight than the massive industry of NGOs in Africa.” says Arnold Aganze, a Congolese writer and director of his latest movie: N.G.O. – Nothing Going On. The movie starts off as a light story about how […]

Symbolic emancipation and present challenges in Togo

Roland Benedikter and William Mensa Tsedze present a retrospective analysis of the progress and issues faced by Togo since its independence.

Read part 1

Togo, one of the smallest and peripheral nations of West Africa, has undertaken a long march towards democracy since the 1960s. But much progress still has to be made. The European Commission’s New Partnership With Africa After […]

  • Permalink President Faure Gnassingbe has overseen an era of economic development for Togo albeit without sufficient political reform
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    ‘Progress for the Few’ – a Retrospective of Democratisation and Development in Togo

‘Progress for the Few’ – a Retrospective of Democratisation and Development in Togo

After signs of democratic awakening spreading throughout Africa such as with Gambia’s opposition winning the presidential elections in December 2016, Togo remains the only ECOWAS nation still waiting for substantial democratisation since the 1960s, according to Roland Benedikter and William Mensa Tsedze.

 

The most recent Least Developed Countries Report presented on December 13, 2016 by the United Nations Conference on […]

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