Ebola

  • Permalink Main street, Paoua, north west Central African Republic (CAR)
Credit: DFID / Simon Davis via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1QpGWXb) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews of 2016

Welcome to our look back to our most popular book reviews of 2016.

Book Review – Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia: Monarchy, Revolution and the Legacy of Meles Zenawi Edited by Gérard Prunier and Éloi Ficquet – An impressive volume, one which contains a wealth of information on the historical, cultural and religious underpinnings of the landlocked country in the Horn of Africa, […]

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    Book Review: Ebola: How a People’s Science Helped End an Epidemic by Paul Richards

Book Review: Ebola: How a People’s Science Helped End an Epidemic by Paul Richards

Ebola: How a People’s Science Helped End an Epidemic is one of the first books to provide an in-depth analysis of the recent pandemic in West Africa, The author Paul Richards has done an excellent job in bringing to the fore community efforts in responding to the virus, says Jamie Hitchen.

 

On a recent visit to Freetown, a Sierra Leonean […]

September 16th, 2016|Book Reviews, Featured, Health|1 Comment|

Africa at LSE Blog: Most Popular Posts of 2015

As the year draws to a close, it is normal to think back on how the year went. For those of us who work on the blog, we asked ourselves which articles our readers liked the most. We thought that you probably would like to know too! We hope you enjoy discovering a post you may have missed or […]

Post-Ebola: What road towards recovery?

The Ebola outbreak had claimed the lives of more 11,000 people and has devastated entire communities at both an economic and psychosocial level, mainly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. There is a necessity to act upon the good intentions and circumstantial discourses, learn lessons and react, says Sandra Lhote-Fernandes.

The main lesson from this crisis has been the inability of health systems to deal […]

August 26th, 2015|Health|0 Comments|
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    In a World Obsessed with Passport Tiers, Citizenship Is Personal and Political

In a World Obsessed with Passport Tiers, Citizenship Is Personal and Political

Robtel Neajai Pailey receives an unwelcome reminder that immigration hierarchies are maintained as a form of erasure and silencing.

Late last week, I was informed that I would not be able to travel to Dubai for an important meeting scheduled months ago.

Like other countries across the globe, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) halted travel for those with Guinean, Liberian, and […]

Why the 2015 African Union Summit a missed opportunity?

Waiswa Nkwanga argues that as the only continental organisation in Africa that brings the continent’s heads of state together every year, the AU should provide the leadership needed to address the most vexing problems affecting the continent.

So far, 2015 has not been a good year for Africa. Whether it is the Ebola virus killing thousands of people in West […]

Reforming Liberia’s Mining Sector Post-Ebola

Robtel Neajai Pailey and Silas Kpanan Ayoung Siakor argue that the most important factor in Liberia’s economic recovery following the Ebola epidemic will not be debt relief and an infusion of aid, but rather an overhaul of the country’s mining sector.

A recent report by the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) reveals that Liberia earned too little from its mining operations […]

April 27th, 2015|Health, Resources|1 Comment|

How Bad Data fed the Ebola Epidemic

Misleading reports, speculation and poor projections from international agencies, government ministries and the media about the Ebola outbreak have exacerbated the problem, say Rachel Glennerster, Tavneet Suri and Herbert M’Cleod.

The West African Ebola outbreak first hit Sierra Leone in May 2014, followed by an explosion of cases in the capital Freetown in September. The epidemic now counts more than […]

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    The Ebola crisis in West Africa and the enduring legacy of the Structural Adjustment Policies

The Ebola crisis in West Africa and the enduring legacy of the Structural Adjustment Policies

LSE alumnus Waiswa Nkwanga argues that the World Bank and IMF must shoulder some of the blame for the poor health infrastructure in many African countries.

As the dramatic Ebola media frenzy wears off, we should not let the problems it has exposed go unexplained. The Ebola crisis lays bare the crux of the matter regarding the pathetic state of […]

Touched by the pain of the Ebola epidemic

Africa at LSE editor Syerramia Willoughby recounts how her distant sympathy for Ebola victims and their surviving families became a raw uncompromising and personal pain.

For better or for worse, the fates of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia are intertwined. Bound together in the Mano River Basin on the tight left-hand corner of western Africa, the interlinking networks of these […]

January 21st, 2015|Featured, Health|10 Comments|

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