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Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews 2017

Here at the Africa at LSE blog, we love bringing to the attention of the public books about Africa. As the year draws to an end, here are our most popular book reviews of 2017. Some great reviews and books haven’t made this list, do visit the book reviews section of our blog to discover more.

The Root Causes […]

Best of the Blogosphere: Mugabe’s Long Goodbye #Zimbabwe

As Robert Mugabe resigns after 37 years in power, LSE’s Grace Thompson has trawled the web to find the best articles analysing events in seven preceding days when the army led the Commander of Zimbabwe’s Defense Forces General Constantine Chiwenga seized control of the country.

 

 Understanding the Military Takeover – The army denied carrying out a coup on Tuesday 14 […]

Let’s talk about neo-colonialism in Africa

In this article, Mark Langan of Newcastle University re-engages the concept of ‘neo-colonialism’ to make sense of the ongoing cycle of poverty in Africa and the failure of development.

 

Neo-colonialism has wrongly lost currency as a concept for examining African ‘development’. This is reflective of university environments in which politer debate about global value chains or the misrule of the ‘Big […]

  • Permalink Credit: La Presse Coloniale Illustrée, 1925, Gallica/ BNFGallery

    There is No “Case for Colonialism”: insights from the colonial economic history.

There is No “Case for Colonialism”: insights from the colonial economic history.

Yannick Dupraz and Valeria Rueda discuss why colonialism is not a development policy to be judged on the basis of a careful cost-benefit analysis.

 

Third World Quarterly recently published a paper in which Bruce Gilley, a political scientist, argues in favour of a modern and improved colonialism. Internally, its argument is profoundly inconsistent, and Sahar Khan already had the patience […]

October 17th, 2017|Economics, Featured|2 Comments|

Jomo Kenyatta, LSE and the independence of Kenya

To commemorate Black History Month, Alex Free profiles Jomo Kenyatta – the first president of Kenya and an LSE graduate who came to London and studied social anthropology under Bronisław Malinowski in the 1930s. A leading pan-Africanist with an ultimately mixed political legacy in office, Kenyatta produced his famous ethnographic study of the Kikuyu, Facing Mount Kenya, while at LSE.

Jomo Kenyatta is a […]

  • Mobutu Sese Seko and Richard Nixon in Washington DC in October 1973
    Permalink Mobutu Sese Seko meets with Richard Nixon in Washington DC in 1973, one of a number of US Presidents whom he befriendedGallery

    In the Shadow of the ‘Great Helmsman’: Mobutu Sese Seko’s Life and Legacy in the DR Congo

In the Shadow of the ‘Great Helmsman’: Mobutu Sese Seko’s Life and Legacy in the DR Congo

On the 20th anniversary of Mobutu Sese Seko’s death, Reuben Loffman examines the life and legacy of one of Africa’s most prominent leaders.

Today marks twenty years since the death of Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu Wa Za Banga (the all-powerful warrior who goes from conquest to conquest leaving fire in his wake) who ruled what is now the Democratic […]

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    Book Review: A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan’s Bitter and Incomplete Divorce by James Copnall

Book Review: A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan’s Bitter and Incomplete Divorce by James Copnall

Nicodemus Minde recommends ‘A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts’ to students and practitioners of peace and conflict in Africa. According to him, the book offers an excellent socio-political and economic analysis of the two Sudans from the time of the divorce in 2011.

Having served as the BBC Sudan correspondent from 2009 to 2012, James Copnall in this updated edition […]

Ghana Must Go: Containing The Mayhem of #Migration

Diana Olaleye tells the story behind the famous ‘Ghana Must Go’ bag.

It is chequered. It is sturdy. It is used worldwide. There is some contention as to whether it can be deemed highly fashionable, but it gains some cool points for being waterproof and available in more than one set of colours. For many, it merely serves the primary function […]

Reading List: Cotton

From the transatlantic slave trade to empire building by the great colonial powers; from international trade to the second-hand clothing industry in developing countries; cotton, it seems, is a subject for all the ages, yet also an industry in real peril. Here is a selection of book reviews and blog posts examining cotton’s place in history and our modern […]

  • Permalink Horn of Africa seen from space

Photo credit:  Dan Markeye via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2stljwY) CC BY 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: The Horn of Africa: State Formation and Decay by Christopher Clapham

Book Review: The Horn of Africa: State Formation and Decay by Christopher Clapham

Christopher Clapham should be commended for synthesising a career of scholarship on the Horn of Africa into a short volume written in fluid and engaging prose. Those seeking an introduction to a region which defies easy explanation would struggle to find a better foundational text in paperback, says Nick Branson.

 

An authority on the Horn of Africa for half a […]

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