History

Somalis in the First World War

As a new exhibition commemorates the Somali effort during the First World War, LSE’s Joanna Lewis analyses how scholarship of the Great War is increasingly encompassing the global contribution of the conflict.
This year marks the centenary of the end of the First World War (1914-18).  In London, one of the most famous WW1 memorials can be found in Hyde […]

  • Permalink Picture by Rev John Weeks 'Native tally of the killed and wounded'. It shows pieces of plantain stalk threaded on a string, each stalk representing a life taken. The large pieces symbolised the chiefs and ordinary men who had been killed, the shorter ones represented the murdered women and children. Copyright LSE Archives.Gallery

    When Archives Speak Back: Sexual Violence in the #Congo Free State

When Archives Speak Back: Sexual Violence in the #Congo Free State

As apologists for colonialism gain prominence, Charlotte Mertens reports how the Congolese voices resting in the Africa archives of Brussels reveal the use of rape, sexual exploitation and torture as punishment, extortion and a display of colonial power.

 

When talking about colonialism, its power structures and durabilities, it matters who speaks. When people in privileged positions speak out in favour […]

  • Permalink University of Gondar grew out of what was once the Public Health College, which was established in 1954. 
Image Credit: University of GondarGallery

    Haile Selassie and his quest to develop a Westernised medical system in Ethiopia

Haile Selassie and his quest to develop a Westernised medical system in Ethiopia

Julianne Weis explores how a colonial mindset on Africa’s place and capacity in relation to Western medicine was fixed and applied to Ethiopia, even though the East African country had never been subject to sustained, colonial occupation like neighbouring African nations.

When Emperor Haile Selassie returned to Addis Ababa from exile in 1941, he granted immediate amnesty to the Italian […]

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    Wakanda, Afrofuturism, and Decolonizing International Relations Scholarship

Wakanda, Afrofuturism, and Decolonizing International Relations Scholarship

As the highly-anticipated film Black Panther is released in cinemas, Yolande Bouka discusses Afrofuturism tugs firmly on black memory, recalling the role of Africans in contemporary International Relations. 

Next week, Marvel Studios will release one of its most anticipated films in the studio’s ten-year history. Black Panther, set in the fictional Wakanda, a vibranium resource-rich and technologically advanced African country, has shattered records by […]

Reading List: Most Popular @AfricaAtLSE Book Reviews 2017

Here at the Africa at LSE blog, we love bringing to the attention of the public books about Africa. As the year draws to an end, here are our most popular book reviews of 2017. Some great reviews and books haven’t made this list, do visit the book reviews section of our blog to discover more.

The Root Causes […]

Best of the Blogosphere: Mugabe’s Long Goodbye #Zimbabwe

As Robert Mugabe resigns after 37 years in power, LSE’s Grace Thompson has trawled the web to find the best articles analysing events in seven preceding days when the army led the Commander of Zimbabwe’s Defense Forces General Constantine Chiwenga seized control of the country.

 

 Understanding the Military Takeover – The army denied carrying out a coup on Tuesday 14 […]

Let’s talk about neo-colonialism in Africa

In this article, Mark Langan of Newcastle University re-engages the concept of ‘neo-colonialism’ to make sense of the ongoing cycle of poverty in Africa and the failure of development.

 

Neo-colonialism has wrongly lost currency as a concept for examining African ‘development’. This is reflective of university environments in which politer debate about global value chains or the misrule of the ‘Big […]

  • Permalink Credit: La Presse Coloniale Illustrée, 1925, Gallica/ BNFGallery

    There is No “Case for Colonialism”: insights from the colonial economic history.

There is No “Case for Colonialism”: insights from the colonial economic history.

Yannick Dupraz and Valeria Rueda discuss why colonialism is not a development policy to be judged on the basis of a careful cost-benefit analysis.

 

Third World Quarterly recently published a paper in which Bruce Gilley, a political scientist, argues in favour of a modern and improved colonialism. Internally, its argument is profoundly inconsistent, and Sahar Khan already had the patience […]

October 17th, 2017|Economics, Featured|2 Comments|

Jomo Kenyatta, LSE and the independence of Kenya

To commemorate Black History Month, Alex Free profiles Jomo Kenyatta – the first president of Kenya and an LSE graduate who came to London and studied social anthropology under Bronisław Malinowski in the 1930s. A leading pan-Africanist with an ultimately mixed political legacy in office, Kenyatta produced his famous ethnographic study of the Kikuyu, Facing Mount Kenya, while at LSE.

Jomo Kenyatta is a […]

  • Mobutu Sese Seko and Richard Nixon in Washington DC in October 1973
    Permalink Mobutu Sese Seko meets with Richard Nixon in Washington DC in 1973, one of a number of US Presidents whom he befriendedGallery

    In the Shadow of the ‘Great Helmsman’: Mobutu Sese Seko’s Life and Legacy in the DR Congo

In the Shadow of the ‘Great Helmsman’: Mobutu Sese Seko’s Life and Legacy in the DR Congo

On the 20th anniversary of Mobutu Sese Seko’s death, Reuben Loffman examines the life and legacy of one of Africa’s most prominent leaders.

Today marks twenty years since the death of Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu Wa Za Banga (the all-powerful warrior who goes from conquest to conquest leaving fire in his wake) who ruled what is now the Democratic […]

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