ICC

  • Permalink Fatou Bensouda and Luis Moreno Ocampo, the current and former Chief Prosecutor for the ICC have both made mistakes in their handling of cases
Photo Credit: Coalition for the ICC via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2eTtdrR)  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Africa and the International Criminal Court: the road to divorce

Africa and the International Criminal Court: the road to divorce

Jon Silverman analyses the roots of African states’ dissatisfaction with the International Criminal Court.

If the rule of law means anything, it is a no-brainer that impunity for those who commit egregious crimes has to be challenged. But when the mechanism for doing that is the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the sole target of its prosecutions is the continent […]

November 15th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gambian President Yahya Jammeh attends a meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) in Dakar, April 2, 2012. (Joe Penney / Reuters)Gallery

    The Gambia’s unsurprising renunciation of the ICC, or the so-called “International Caucasian Court”

The Gambia’s unsurprising renunciation of the ICC, or the so-called “International Caucasian Court”

LSE’s Ian Sprouse explains the decision of The Gambia to withdraw from the International Criminal Court through a retrospective on the rule of President Yahya Jammeh.

On 25 October 2016, The Gambia’s information minister, Sheriff Baba Bojang, announced the intention of the tiny West African country to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC). Echoing Burundi’s claims, Mr Bojang accused […]

November 10th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|
  • Permalink South African President Jacob Zuma shares a laugh with Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir (Photo: Ntswe Mkoena / EPA)Gallery

    Some Thoughts on South Africa’s Withdrawal From the International Criminal Court

Some Thoughts on South Africa’s Withdrawal From the International Criminal Court

LSE alumnus Mark Kersten debates key issues around the ICC withdrawal of South Africa, Burundi and Gambia.

 

Contrary to the suggestion of some, the dust on South Africa’s and Burundi’s (and Gambia‘s) withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC) has not settled. It won’t for some time. These two withdrawals have sparked an intense debate on the future of the […]

October 27th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Burundi refugees at the Mahama refugee camp, Rwanda.

Photo credit: EU/ECHO/Thomas Conan
CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (Via Flickr http://bit.ly/1K5Wbwy)Gallery

    Burundi’s Awkward — and Mostly Pointless — Farewell to the ICC

Burundi’s Awkward — and Mostly Pointless — Farewell to the ICC

Mark Kersten analyses Burundi’s withdrawal from the International Criminal Court.

 
A government led by a President accused of mass human rights violations and crimes against humanity is seeking to end its relationship with the International Criminal Court (ICC). No, the President insists, this is not about hiding from justice. Instead, Pierre Nkurunziza maintains, it is because the Court is biased […]

October 25th, 2016|Featured, Human Rights|0 Comments|

Looking Beyond the International Criminal Court

Richard Mutabazi argues that the ICC needs to incorporate the traditional processes of the communities it seeks to represent if it is to succeed in its pursuit of international justice.

If the international community is to achieve global justice and peace, it has to look beyond institutions such as the ICC and adopt alternative methods of negotiating justice.

Firstly, traditional methods […]

Yes, the ICC is in Crisis. It Always Has Been.

The ICC is the kind of institution and project that needs to be in crisis, says LSE alumnus Mark Kersten.
It has become increasingly common for scholars and observers of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to state that the ICC is in “crisis”. Conference panels, a host of academic articles, news pieces and op-eds seem drawn towards posing some […]

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    War Child or Warlord? The Justice Paradox in Ongwen’s ICC case

War Child or Warlord? The Justice Paradox in Ongwen’s ICC case

As recently-captured LRA commander Dominic Ongwen awaits his second hearing at The Hague, LSE’s Donnas Ojok looks at whether the 34-year-old former child soldier will receive the right kind of justice from the International Criminal Court.

As someone who witnessed the gruesome conflict and who works on the rehabilitation and reconstruction phase in Northern Uganda, I not only have the […]

February 23rd, 2015|Conflict, Human Rights|0 Comments|
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    The collapse of Uhuru Kenyatta’s case could be a potential deathblow to the International Criminal Court

The collapse of Uhuru Kenyatta’s case could be a potential deathblow to the International Criminal Court

As the ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda drops all charges against Kenya’s leader, LSE’s Fiona Mungai and Yusuf Kiranda argue that it is time for African countries to strengthen their judicial institutions.

The recent collapse of the International Criminal Court (ICC) case against Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta does not come as a surprise. The turn of events was perhaps expected owing […]

December 16th, 2014|Featured, Human Rights|2 Comments|
  • Permalink An IDP camp in Kenya Photo: AP Gallery

    The Lesson the ICC Shouldn’t Learn in the Wake of Kenyatta

The Lesson the ICC Shouldn’t Learn in the Wake of Kenyatta

Mark Kersten argues that there is a danger in drawing the wrong lesson from the International Criminal Court’s intervention in Kenya.

The long-dithering case against Uhuru Kenyatta at the International Criminal Court (ICC) finally came to an unceremonious conclusion this past week. In a long anticipated move, the Prosecution announced its case against the Kenyan President was too weak to proceed.

Over […]

December 11th, 2014|Human Rights|0 Comments|

What Gives? African Union Head of State Immunity

With African leaders voting to grant themselves and their senior officials immunity from prosecution for genocide and crimes against humanity,  LSE’s Mark Kersten analyses how much of a setback this is for international justice on the African continent. In June 2014, the African Union (AU) voted to grant immunity from prosecution to all African Heads of State and “senior officials” at […]

July 14th, 2014|Human Rights|0 Comments|

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