Kenya

Debunking Delusions around Deworming

Tim Allen and Melissa Parker argue that a biosocial approach is necessary for ‘deworming’ to succeed in improving lives.

The term Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) was introduced around 15 years ago and has helped in concentrating attention on largely-ignored infections. Indeed, it has resulted in what has been hailed as the largest public health programme ever undertaken. However, the success of […]

February 13th, 2017|Featured, Health|0 Comments|
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    Book review: Making the Mark; Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting by Miroslava Prazak

Book review: Making the Mark; Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting by Miroslava Prazak

Annemarie Middelburg describes the book as an absolute must-read that gives voice not only to Kuria people who have undergone male or female circumcision in Kenya, but to everyone connected to the practice.

Miroslava Prazak is a scholar of development and cultural change at Bennington College. She has spent more than twenty years with the Kuria people in the rolling […]

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    Kenya’s Devolved Land Administration Marks the Start of a New Phase of Political Struggle over Land Control

Kenya’s Devolved Land Administration Marks the Start of a New Phase of Political Struggle over Land Control

Catherine Boone and Ambreena Manji examine whether long-awaited land law reform in Kenya has resolved longstanding land grievances.

Kenya’s 2010 Constitution created 47 new counties and empowered them to take over key aspects of land administration, including oversight of public lands, construction of transparent land registries to combat land-grabbing and corruption, and management of community land.  Much hope and energy […]

Britain and the Scramble for East Africa

LSE’s Jonas Fossli Gjersø examines the reasons behind Britain annexation of modern-day Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

 

By the end of the 19th century, Britain had amassed an enormous colonial empire in Africa. In an almost unbroken line, it spanned from Alexandria in the north to Cape Town in the south, and was famously epitomised in the image of the Rhodes […]

Subverting Love Stories

LSE’s Clare Coultas questions the portrayal of love in global sexual health promotion campaigns and argues that it is imperative that connecting love with safety and protection in sexual health needs to be rooted in subversion for such campaigns to succeed.

Monogamous love is frequently used in global sexual health promotion efforts to try to inspire choices about “safe sexual […]

Uber is arriving now: Driving urban mobility in Africa

The Uber revolution has arrived. The ride-share app launched services in South Africa, Kenya, Egypt, and more recently in Uganda and Ghana. One of the biggest potential benefits of Uber in African cities could be to provide urban planners and authorities grappling with how to manage rapid urbanisation with access to data. The app collects substantial data on ride times, routes, and estimates of the supply and demand for paid transport. Astrid […]

September 12th, 2016|Economics, Featured, Society|0 Comments|
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    WhatsApp, Facebook and pakapaka: Digital lives in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda

WhatsApp, Facebook and pakapaka: Digital lives in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda

LSE’s Savita Bailur and Emrys Schoemaker explore how young people in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda use mobile internet.

“I am into like this video editing … wedding programs, wedding invitation, I do it for them like it’s in a form of video so I use my mobile phone. And I have this app, I have [put] some of the jobs […]

  • Permalink Countries that implement programmes stipulated by the World Bank (pictured) or IMF are missing out on homegrown development
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    Book Review: Homegrown Development in Africa: Reality or Illusion? by Chukwumerije Okereke and Patricia Agupusi

Book Review: Homegrown Development in Africa: Reality or Illusion? by Chukwumerije Okereke and Patricia Agupusi

LSE’s Naomi Pendle says that Chukwumerije Okereke and Patricia Agupusi are successful in presenting a new, in-depth analysis of what it really might mean for development to be homegrown in Africa.

The book, Homegrown Development in Africa: Reality or Illusion? asks whether development strategies in Africa really are autonomous from external control and are, therefore, Homegrown Development (HGD). The book […]

February 26th, 2016|Development, Featured|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Oil tankers off the coast of Takoradi 
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    Book Review – Africa’s New Oil: Power, Pipelines and Future Fortunes by Celeste Hicks

Book Review – Africa’s New Oil: Power, Pipelines and Future Fortunes by Celeste Hicks

Jesse Salah Ovadia describes this title by Celeste Hicks as providing an insightful window into contemporary debates around petro-development in Africa.

As Celeste Hicks notes in the conclusion to Africa’s New Oil, there has been ‘an unprecedented amount of interest and focus’ on the topic of new oil finds in Africa. What makes Hicks’ book unique is her perspective as […]

Africa at LSE Blog: Most Popular Posts of 2015

As the year draws to a close, it is normal to think back on how the year went. For those of us who work on the blog, we asked ourselves which articles our readers liked the most. We thought that you probably would like to know too! We hope you enjoy discovering a post you may have missed or […]

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