Public Authority

Reading List: Most popular blog posts of 2018

As the final few hours of 2018 dwindle away, let’s look back at 2018 and discover the best-read Africa@LSE blog posts of the year.

 

Transformation euphoria in the Horn of Africa – As political transformation occurs across the Horn of Africa at an unprecedented pace, Abukar Arman provides a comprehensive analysis of the rapidly changing situation.
The unenviable situation of Tigreans […]

When is Going with The Grain Making the Problem Worse?

In order to realise change, development practitioners sometimes make compromises with groups that do not always share the same ideals.  Following a recent workshop on social accountability, Tom Kirk and Annette JE Fisher reflect on the discussions held and ask when, and how, ‘going with the grain’ can make a problem worse.

 This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog […]

  • Permalink Maize fields in Nwoya District. Photo credit: Carolin DieterleGallery

    What crop theft in northern Uganda tells us about relations between investors and communities

What crop theft in northern Uganda tells us about relations between investors and communities

In the Acholi sub-region of northern Uganda, commercial farmers are experiencing an increasing theft of maize. Arthur Owor and Carolin Dieterle explore the underlying reasons for this and draw attention to the need for more meaningful collaboration between investors and host communities.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

In […]

Mind the Billboards: The Paradox of Paternalism in Burundi

Astrid Jamar continues her analysis of the prominence of aid billboards in Burundi and how these contribute to colonial continuities which in turn shape the public space and public authority in the East African country. In the second and final blog post of this series, Astrid Jamar examines the text, logos and images displayed on the boards, which reveal […]

  • Permalink A series of aid billboard along the roadside in Rutana, Burundi in June 2018
Image Credit: Astrid JamarGallery

    Mind the Billboards: International Aid Conquering the Public Space in Burundi

Mind the Billboards: International Aid Conquering the Public Space in Burundi

This two-part blog series will examine the prominence of aid billboards in Burundi and analyse how these billboards produce colonial continuities, which in turn shape the public space and public authority in Burundi. In the first article, Astrid Jamar discusses how these billboards and their colonial nature dominate the public space. Along with symbols of the regime, their physical […]

  • Permalink Sure you may be the Public Authority round here, but can you fill in a logframe?Gallery

    How DFID works with non-state power holders in fragile and conflict-afflicted places

How DFID works with non-state power holders in fragile and conflict-afflicted places

Duncan Green interviews DFID’s Wilf Mwamba about how donors understand and work with public authority.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

One of the highlights of the recent conference on accountability and empowerment in fragile/conflict states was hanging out with a true ‘development entrepreneur’, Wilf Mwamba. Wilf, a rising star […]

  • A car with a slogan, Whoever is involved in landgrabbing will regret
    Permalink Photo Credit: Sophie AubertGallery

    What Land Governance in Uganda can teach us about #PublicAuthority

What Land Governance in Uganda can teach us about #PublicAuthority

Carolin Dieterle investigates the how, when and where of large-scale land investments in Uganda.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

In the last decade since the financial and food price crisis of 2007/08, large tracts of land across the developing world, especially in Africa, have been acquired by […]

Family politics and female authority in Sierra Leone

In Freetown, Sierra Leone, electoral politics is not the dominant form of politics. Jonah Lipton sheds light on the significance of family politics and the prominence of women in these decision-making processes.

 This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

 

In March of this year general elections were held in […]

#PublicAuthority through the eyes of a Dead Fish

Duncan Green is fascinated about just how much can be learned about public authority by tracking fish – from the lake to the market.

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

One of the highlights of the May 2018 conference in Ghent was a presentation by Esther Marijnen about her research in […]

  • Permalink Image Credit: Josaphat MusambaGallery

    What I learned about #PublicAuthority from spending two days with a bunch of anthropologists, political scientists and others

What I learned about #PublicAuthority from spending two days with a bunch of anthropologists, political scientists and others

Duncan Green reviews the annual CPAID workshop during which Public Authority researchers had a chance to discuss their upcoming work. 

This article is part of the #PublicAuthority blog series, part of the ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development. 

The Centre for Public Authority and International Development had its annual get together in May 2018. It really hurt my head, but the pain was […]

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