Religion

African Pentecostal churches in Britain’s urban spaces

Richard Burgess looks at a Nigerian Pentecostal church in the London borough of Islington and finds that the church’s ability to occupy a permanent and dedicated space has influenced its visibility in the public sphere.

Our Pentecostalism in Britain series is in collaboration with LSE’s Religion and the Public Sphere blog.

In recent decades, London’s religious landscape has undergone significant changes […]

The Pastor as Sexual Object

As Pentecostal pastors in a number of African countries increasingly occupy the spotlight as authorities on economic, political, and cultural matters,  Ebenezer Obadare explores how these individuals are also becoming the center of an erotic economy.

At the core of my ongoing study of Pentecostal pastors and changing forms of authority in Africa are two related premises.

First, due to a […]

March 27th, 2017|Featured, Society|0 Comments|
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    How are black majority churches growing in the UK? A London Borough case study

How are black majority churches growing in the UK? A London Borough case study

Andrew Rogers’ Being Built Together project found 240 black majority churches in Southwark, south London, the greatest concentration of African Christianity in the world outside of Africa, it is believed. Here Rogers looks at how this relates to the broader picture of church growth and decline in the UK, finding that urban religious landscapes have changed dramatically over recent […]

  • Permalink David Cameron attended the Redeemed Christian Church of God’s Festival of Life in 2015, just before the last general electionGallery

    Virtuous citizens: Pentecostal social activism in an age of suspicion

Virtuous citizens: Pentecostal social activism in an age of suspicion

Through social activism Nigerian Pentecostals in London are carving out a space in society and making a claim for public recognition says Simon Coleman.

Our Pentecostalism in Britain series is in collaboration with LSE’s Religion and the Public Sphere blog.

Migration is probably always a combination of opportunity and threat—for both migrants and members of host societies. Things aren’t made much […]

  • Permalink b.	Empire Windrush brought one of the first large groups of post-war West Indian immigrants to the United Kingdom
Photo Credit: Creative Commons, Wikimedia: Royal Navy official photographer
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    Pentecostalism in Britain today: Making up for failures of the past

Pentecostalism in Britain today: Making up for failures of the past

A Pentecostal symposium and celebration will take place in London on Saturday 26 November 2016 profiling the diversity that exists in British Pentecostalism today. Almost seventy years after Windrush, Bishop Dr Joe Aldred argues that the symposium is a way to reclaim ground lost when White British Pentecostals failed along with the rest of the British church to welcome […]

  • Permalink African-initiated Pentecostal churches are on the rise in the United Kingdom
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    African-initiated Pentecostal churches are on the rise in the UK – what role do they seek to play in wider society?

African-initiated Pentecostal churches are on the rise in the UK – what role do they seek to play in wider society?

Pentecostals traditionally see social issues in spiritual terms. Here, Leslie Fesenmyer details how a Pentecostal lunch programme in East London has gone against this trend and how migrant-led churches are helping to reinvigorate Protestantism.

Our Pentecostalism in Britain series is in collaboration with LSE’s Religion and the Public Sphere blog.

African-initiated Pentecostal churches are on the rise in the United Kingdom, […]

A History of Pentecostalism in Britain

Stephen Hunt analyses the history of the pentecostal movement in the United Kingdom.

Our Pentecostalism in Britain series is in collaboration with LSE’s Religion and the Public Sphere blog.

Through its very many manifestations or ‘streams’, Pentecostalism has long enjoyed a presence in Britain since its inception at the beginning of the twentieth century and via the several revivalist forms of […]

  • Permalink Uganda's first ever televised presidential debate was missing the incumbent and ultimate victor, President Museveni Photo credit: GodfreyGallery

    ‘For God and my country’ – Fighting the (spirits of) Violence and Chaos in Uganda’s Elections

‘For God and my country’ – Fighting the (spirits of) Violence and Chaos in Uganda’s Elections

Through prayer, civic education, summons, pastoral letters and the public blessing of politicians, religious leaders have been doing their best over the past few months to influence the Ugandan elections held on 18 February 2016. In the limelight, many of the nation’s most prominent religious leaders have campaigned for peaceful, free and fair elections, while others use their pulpits […]

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Solomon Kibriye
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    Book Review – Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia: Monarchy, Revolution and the Legacy of Meles Zenawi Edited by Gérard Prunier and Éloi Ficquet

Book Review – Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia: Monarchy, Revolution and the Legacy of Meles Zenawi Edited by Gérard Prunier and Éloi Ficquet

Understanding Contemporary Ethiopia is an impressive volume, one which contains a wealth of information on the historical, cultural and religious underpinnings of the landlocked country in the Horn of Africa, says Nick Branson.

This edited volume draws substantially on a 2007 collection compiled under Gérard Prunier’s direction while at the French Centre for Ethiopian Studies. Chapters retained from L’Éthiopie contemporaine […]

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    Electoral Theologies: Pentecostal Pastors and the 2015 Presidential Election in Nigeria

Electoral Theologies: Pentecostal Pastors and the 2015 Presidential Election in Nigeria

Ebenezer Obadare takes a comprehensive look at the role influential Pentecostal Pastors played in Nigeria’s 2015 Presidential election.

In the end, the 28 March 2015 presidential election in Nigeria was a perfect anti-climax. Not only did the widespread post-election anarchy confidently foretold by leading commentators and politicians on both sides of the political divide not materialize; the election did in […]

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