Resources

  • Permalink A copper mine in Katanga 
Photo Credit: Fairphone via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2ibSRKH)  CC BY-NC-SAGallery

    Book Review – Congo’s Environmental Paradox: Potential and Predation in a Land of Plenty by Theodore Trefon

Book Review – Congo’s Environmental Paradox: Potential and Predation in a Land of Plenty by Theodore Trefon

Jonathan Silver says Congo’s Environmental Paradox by Theodore Trefon might prompt consideration about how we value Congo’s contribution to the world.

In Congo’s Environmental Paradox; Potential and Predation in a Land of Plenty, Theodore Trefon has written an important book that weaves together an overview of the country’s key ecological resources with a concise and important political analysis. Trefon examines […]

  • Permalink Photo Credit: zimbabweelection.comGallery

    Book Review – Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds edited by Richard Saunders and Tinashe Nyamunda

Book Review – Facets of Power: Politics, Profits and People in the Making of Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds edited by Richard Saunders and Tinashe Nyamunda

Facets of Power is an extremely timely volume which chronicles a turbulent decade following the discovery of alluvial diamonds in Chiadzwa, Mutare district, in 2006. Detailing how a national asset was commandeered by a small clique, nine expert authors examine the pitfalls of international and domestic attempts to constrain elite predation. The text provides important lessons which should resonate […]

Can Senegal withstand the resource curse?

As Senegal prepares to become a gas exporter, Adolphus Washington analyses the challenges ahead.

Last month Senegal’s president Macky Sall announced the discovery of the largest deep water gas fields in West Africa by the US company Kosmos Energy. Production in the gas fields can translate into a massive windfall for Senegal’s Emerging Plan, which is the government’s economic initiative […]

Photo Blog: Artisanal Gold Mining in South Africa

Janet Munakamwe details the process of artisanal gold mining by migrant workers in South Africa. This photo blog is a companion piece to the article, Between a rock and a hard place: Informal artisanal gold mining in Johannesburg by Zaheera Jinnah.

 

 

 

 

All Photography by Alexia Webster and Janet Munakamwe: 13/09/2014

Janet Munakamwe is a doctoral researcher at the African Centre […]

  • Permalink The tool in this photo is one of the major artisanal tools used by zama-zama popularly known as ‘hamura’ (hammer).
Photography by Alexia Webster and Janet Munakamwe 13/09/2014Gallery

    Between a rock and a hard place: Informal artisanal gold mining in Johannesburg

Between a rock and a hard place: Informal artisanal gold mining in Johannesburg

Zaheera Jinnah shares ongoing research being done on artisanal gold mining and its connections to migration, informality and social exclusion in South Africa.

This post is part of our series African Perspectives on Migration looking at the theme of Intra-Africa migration.

On the western periphery of Johannesburg, with the famous skyline of the city silhouetted in the early morning sun, Bongani is beginning […]

Africa at LSE Blog: Most Popular Posts of 2015

As the year draws to a close, it is normal to think back on how the year went. For those of us who work on the blog, we asked ourselves which articles our readers liked the most. We thought that you probably would like to know too! We hope you enjoy discovering a post you may have missed or […]

The Complex Truths of Oil Politics

Omolade Adunbi discusses the books that inspire him and that have had a lasting influence on his research.

When I started graduate school at Yale in the early 2000s, Nigeria, my home country, had just transitioned from many years of military dictatorship to a democracy. I thought I would begin my graduate research by looking at the interesting but […]

Uganda: Digging for Social Justice in Karamoja

Simone Datzberger and Tenywa Aloysius Malagala examine how the poor provision of education for the Karamojong in Northern Uganda affects the community’s ability to advocate for their rights in the face of mineral resource exploitation.

Nestled amid the hills of the northeastern Ugandan-Kenyan border, a small Karamojong community in Nakabaat struggles to come to terms with a conflict-ridden past and […]

Rich but poor: Exorcising Africa’s resource curse

LSE’s Martin Namasaka explores how some African countries can overcome the curse of being blessed with extensive resources.

In a remote corner of south eastern Guinea, the lush green highlands of Simandou are at the centre of a transformation being felt all over Africa after the discovery of one of the world’s richest and most coveted repositories of iron ore, […]

March 16th, 2015|Featured, Resources|5 Comments|

Book Review: The Oil Curse: How Petroleum Wealth Shapes the Development of Nations by Michael L. Ross

Countries that are rich in petroleum have less democracy, less economic stability, and more frequent civil wars than countries without oil. What explains this oil curse? And can it be fixed? Michael L. Ross looks at how developing nations are shaped by their mineral wealth–and how they can turn oil from a curse into a blessing. Ramin Nassehi recommends this book to […]

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