South Sudan

Ending Impunity in South Sudan

Rachel Ibreck and Alex de Waal argue that, despite the ongoing violence, South Sudan is not a lawless society and courts can contribute to ending the conflict.

In the course of recurrent wars, South Sudanese people have suffered numerous atrocities with little or no opportunities for accountability. The peace agreements of 1972 and 2005 had no provisions for justice. But […]

February 23rd, 2017|Conflict, Featured|2 Comments|

Uganda’s Exceptional Approach to the Refugee Challenge

LSE’s Marina Elgawly discusses Uganda as a potential model for addressing the refugee crisis globally.

October 2016 marked the full dismantlement of “the Jungle”, the notorious refugee camp in Calais that had come to symbolise the failure of EU refugee and migrant policy. The squalor of Calais brought to light the current rhetoric which surrounds the global approach towards the […]

  • Permalink Sudan agriculture Landsat 
Photo Credit: Public Domain, via Wikimedia CommonsGallery

    Africa’s Nile basin countries should invest in rain, not big infrastructure projects

Africa’s Nile basin countries should invest in rain, not big infrastructure projects

South Sudan could export as much as $1.8 billion in rain-fed food products, writes Christian Siderius.

 

In July 2016, the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) and over 1000 experts gathered in Dar es Salaam during the Africa Water Week to discuss new pathways for development and increased investment in water infrastructure. The challenges are huge; the El Nino of […]

  • Permalink Riek Machar Teny-Dhurgon, First Vice-President of the Republic of South Sudan; President Salva Kiir; and James Wani Igga, Second Vice-President of the Republic of South Sudan join hands as the  Transitional Government of National Unity is sworn in on April 2016
Photo Credit: UN Photo via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2anlXoG) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Post-Conflict Peacebuilding in South Sudan: The Security Dilemma in a Transitional Government of National Unity

Post-Conflict Peacebuilding in South Sudan: The Security Dilemma in a Transitional Government of National Unity

Nicodemus Minde analyses the ongoing quest for peace in the world’s youngest country, South Sudan.

 

An uneasy peace descended upon South Sudan in April 2016, when Riek Machar, leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement—In Opposition (SPLM-IO) and former vice president of South Sudan, returned to the capital Juba after months in hiding and was sworn in as vice president […]

August 23rd, 2016|Conflict, Featured|2 Comments|
  • Permalink Dr Riek Machar and President Salva Kiir stand up for the national anthem after the former took his oath as the 1st Vice President of South Sudan in April 2016 Photo Credit: UNMISS via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2avETlS) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    South Sudan’s Leaders have Tarnished the Dreams of Independence for their People

South Sudan’s Leaders have Tarnished the Dreams of Independence for their People

Jacob D. Chol analyses why peace is so elusive in independent South Sudan.

Since attaining independence on 9 July 2011, South Sudan has topped local, regional and international headlines on the vast challenges that the nascent State has faced. Yet, more international attention, whether consciously or unconsciously, has been focused on Syria, France and Turkey. Born a pre-failed State, the […]

August 8th, 2016|Conflict, Featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Riek Machar Teny-Dhurgon, First Vice-President of the Republic of South Sudan; President Salva Kiir; and James Wani Igga, Second Vice-President of the Republic of South Sudan join hands as the  Transitional Government of National Unity is sworn in on April 2016
Photo Credit: UN Photo via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2anlXoG) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Peace Agreements Often Fail to Empower the People #SouthSudan

Peace Agreements Often Fail to Empower the People #SouthSudan

As violence flares in South Sudan once again, Naomi Pendle says that the way peace is made or war is fought will either empower or undermine the South Sudanese people.

 

In Juba on the evening of Monday 11 July 2016, as the previous days of gun battles subsided, South Sudanese firemen came to the streets to collect lorry loads of bodies. […]

  • Permalink Photo credit: James Case via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1Z0r2o6) CC BY 2.0Gallery

    Two-way, Not One-way Communication: Why Dialogue Should Be Included in Health Programs

Two-way, Not One-way Communication: Why Dialogue Should Be Included in Health Programs

Emily LeRoux-Rutledge discusses the importance of dialogue as a method of imparting information in a South Sudanese health programme.

On a hot, dry day in a village in the North of South Sudan, ten Dinka-speaking women are sitting under a tree listening to the radio. A local midwife on the radio is trying to debunk the traditional belief in ruaak.

Ruaak dictates […]

April 13th, 2016|Featured, Health|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Parliament in Juba Credit: BBC World Service via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1QWoTs7) CC BY-NC 2.0Gallery

    Book Review – South Sudan: A Slow Liberation by Edward Thomas

Book Review – South Sudan: A Slow Liberation by Edward Thomas

LSE’s Chris Suckling reviews Edward Thomas’ comprehensive, multi-layered examination of the forces that have shaped the South Sudan of today.

The civil conflict pitched between President Salva Kiir’s ruling Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement (SPLM), and political and military defectors led by former Vice President Riek Machar, has typically been presented in both cynical and cyclical terms: broken ceasefires are predictable […]

The Ethics of Refugee Repatriation

Mollie Gerver examines how refugees can be assisted in a making an informed choice in returning to a country from which they have fled.

This post is part of our series African Perspectives on Migration looking at the theme of regular migration.

Around the world, refugees are often denied rights under the 1951 Convention for the Protection of Refugees. They cannot access work […]

Overhaul Needed in Stalled South Sudan Peace Process

LSE alumnus Jacob Dut looks as the drivers behind the failure in the South Sudan peace negotiations.

On 15 December 2013, the fledgling nation of South Sudan made a sudden descent into civil war as the President Salva Kiir and his erstwhile deputy Dr Riek Machar found themselves on opposite sides of the political divide. Given the success of the […]

April 1st, 2015|Conflict|1 Comment|

Bad Behavior has blocked 2837 access attempts in the last 7 days.