Research

Learning from Children and Families

by Heather Kappes, Department of Management
As part of our project studying the roots of financial resilience in childhood (funded by the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) at LSE and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation), Matteo Galizzi and I have been collecting data from children, ages 4-12. Recently, we’ve started to contact young participants along with their parents or guardians […]

By |January 31st, 2017|Research|

A new subject pool

by Heather Kappes, Assistant Professor, Department of Management

 

A group of participants available to participate in research studies at a given location is often referred to as a subject pool. For instance, the LSE’s Behavioural Research Lab has a pool of potential participants made up of students, staff, and local individuals.

On October 2nd Matteo Galizzi and I did some research […]

By |October 18th, 2016|Events, Research|

What is Behavioural Science at the LSE?

by Heather Kappes, Assistant Professor, Department of Management

Even as Behavioural Science has emerged as a field of study, it has not been clear that it means the same thing to everyone. This may be a good thing! Disciplines that are broadly defined and that allow for different interpretations are inherently more likely to serve as useful umbrellas under which […]

By |May 24th, 2016|Research|
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    What is happiness? Should citizens choose or should we simply measure it more accurately?

What is happiness? Should citizens choose or should we simply measure it more accurately?

by Paul Dolan, George Kavetsos, Laura Kudrna, Kate Laffan, and Stefano Testoni

Your question sounds very pertinent, Charlie Brown, now that monitoring happiness is a serious policy objective. How we define happiness is key, as it will inform and guide policy interventions. But, still, how should we define it? Perhaps as the absence of pain, in the wake of Epicurean […]

By |May 23rd, 2016|Research|
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    Happiness Research Draws Our Attention to Both Structure and Agency

Happiness Research Draws Our Attention to Both Structure and Agency

By Professor Paul Dolan 
Happiness research draws our attention to how the structure of society impacts upon our wellbeing just as much as it does to individual behaviours and characteristics, writes Paul Dolan. Being happier, therefore, involves both structure and agency. 
Research into happiness has increased in recent years and we know a lot more than we once did about its determinants. Researchers […]

By |January 4th, 2016|Research|

Does Money Buy Happiness? It Depends on the Context

By Ilka Gleibs 
Ilka Gleibs explains how the money–happiness link is variable and highly context-dependent. Two studies she conducted showed that both money (individual income) and community (social capital) can be the basis for individual happiness, and that the relative influence of each factor depends on the context. She argues that strong social relations are much more consistent in providing us with […]

By |January 4th, 2016|Research|

How Women Footballers Can Overcome Negative Stereotypes

By Ilka Gleibs 
English footballers wrote history this week. For the first time ever, they won at the knock-out stage and reached the quarter finals.
Hang on, you might say, this cannot be true? England won the world cup in 1966 and reached the quarter final several times before? The success was in fact achieved by the women’s football squad, who are […]

By |December 22nd, 2015|Research|

Will Having Children Make You Happier?

By Professor Paul Dolan 

Until now, the evidence had all gone one way. Now we may know better.

When I first began researching happiness, most of the findings were not surprising: Becoming unemployed makes people very unhappy. Marriage provides a happiness boost. Being very poor is miserable and being very rich is not all it’s cracked up to be. When I encountered the research on having […]

By |December 21st, 2015|Research|

The Importance of Informed Consent in Social Media Research

By Ilka Gleibs 
Informed consent is important in large-scale social media research to protect the privacy, autonomy, and control of social media users. Ilka Gleibs argues for an approach to consent that fosters contextual integrity where adequate protection for privacy is tied to specific contexts. Rather than prescribing universal rules for what is public (a Facebook page, or Twitter feed) and what is […]

By |December 20th, 2015|Research|
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    Paying incentives to be healthy only works in the long term if you pay to NOT do something

Paying incentives to be healthy only works in the long term if you pay to NOT do something

By Matteo Galizzi

Monetary incentives to encourage people to live healthier lifestyles only work in the longer term when they are designed to stop negative behaviour, rather than promote positive choices, suggests new research from LSE.

A paper  published in Social Science and Medicine describes the results of a laboratory experiment where participants were invited to watch a series of videos while […]

By |September 18th, 2015|Research|