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About Roch Dunin-Wasowicz

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So far Roch Dunin-Wasowicz has created 623 entries.
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    UK influence after Brexit: the Commonwealth should be seen as a network, not as an excuse

UK influence after Brexit: the Commonwealth should be seen as a network, not as an excuse

Portraying the Commonwealth as a group of trading partners who share similar values and that will bolster the UK’s influence and prosperity after Brexit is at best delusional, writes Fred Carver. He argues that while the Commonwealth can be used as a diplomatic network in certain cases, it should not be used as a catch-all excuse for trade […]

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    Have attitudes toward a second Brexit referendum reached a ‘turning point’?

Have attitudes toward a second Brexit referendum reached a ‘turning point’?

On 15 April, a campaign to hold a referendum on the final terms of the Brexit deal was launched in the UK. But do the public want another vote? And have attitudes toward holding a second referendum really changed in recent months, as some pro-EU campaigners suggest? John Curtice (Strathclyde University) says that there is little reason to think support for a second referendum […]

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    How will Brexit affect the social security rights and protections of EU migrants in the UK?

How will Brexit affect the social security rights and protections of EU migrants in the UK?

Linda Hantrais focuses on two ways in which social security provisions may be affected by Brexit: the social security rights of EU migrants to the UK, where EU institutions have come to play an important coordinating role; and, the social protection rights of British officials working for EU institutions, where benefits and employers’ contributions are paid from the EU […]

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    The powers of the Lords in Brexit are substantial but unlikely to be used to full effect

The powers of the Lords in Brexit are substantial but unlikely to be used to full effect

The Prime Minister suffered a big defeat in the House of Lords yesterday as peers endorsed requiring ministers to consider customs union membership post-Brexit. While this shows that the powers of the House of Lords in the Brexit process are substantial, they are unlikely to be used to full effect, explains Richard Reid (University of Oxford).

Yesterday (Wednesday) the House of Lords moved to the Report […]

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    The Commonwealth advantage: trading with the bloc offers buoyant economic prospects

The Commonwealth advantage: trading with the bloc offers buoyant economic prospects

One of Brexit’s potential advantages is the UK’s freedom to negotiate its own trade deals instead of being dependent on the EU. Of course, trade will continue with the EU after Brexit, probably little changed, and there is little doubt that the EU will continue to be a major trading partner after Brexit. But it is widely expected that […]

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    The EU referendum was more a vote for re-regulation than for de-regulation

The EU referendum was more a vote for re-regulation than for de-regulation

Drawing on new polling of attitudes to Brexit, Marley Morris explores the public’s preference for different trade scenarios when faced with a number of difficult trade-offs. He concludes that, if the government wants public support for its negotiating position, it must negotiate a deal that keeps the European model close – and rejects the deregulation agenda.

The strange irony of […]

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    What government has to do in order to get its Brexit deal through Parliament

What government has to do in order to get its Brexit deal through Parliament

By October ministers hope to have negotiated a withdrawal agreement on the terms of the UK’s departure from the European Union (EU), and a ‘framework for a future relationship’ on the long-term UK–EU relations. To reach an agreement with the EU on these documents in so little time will be a monumental challenge for the Government – but […]

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    Good Friday Agreement two decades on: how not to fix the Irish border problem

Good Friday Agreement two decades on: how not to fix the Irish border problem

The Irish border issue has proven to be one of the most difficult problems to solve in the Brexit negotiations so far. Katy Hayward responds to recent proposals by Shanker Singham on how to address the issue, arguing that the proposals not only overlook the complex realities of Northern Ireland/Ireland connections, but also ignore the enormity of what has been accomplished in the […]

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    The UK political system has been stirred by the Brexit process

The UK political system has been stirred by the Brexit process

Through its insistence on leaving the EU, the May government has created an immense, administrative and technical challenge for itself. Moreover, it must be completed within a perilously short timeframe. Andrew Blick (King’s College London) investigates the complications ahead of the Withdrawal Bill accounting for all the players involved.

The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill currently passing through the House of Lords is an important […]

Who really cares about Northern Ireland?

This week marks the 20th anniversary of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement. Katy Hayward (Queens University Belfast) considers the current debate about whether Brexit is a threat to peace and stability in Northern Ireland. She argues that the obsession with avoiding physical infrastructure at the border represents a very limited view of where risks to the peace process might […]