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    Losing the ‘Europeanisation’ meta-narrative for modernising British democracy

Losing the ‘Europeanisation’ meta-narrative for modernising British democracy

Despite claims of Britain’s enduring political and constitutional distinctiveness, in the period from 1997 to 2016 the UK in fact modernised its polity by following several strong ‘Europeanisation’ trends. Increasingly, British democracy came to resemble other European liberal democracies in some fundamental ways. Yet now this meta-narrative may be lost following Brexit. Patrick Dunleavy (LSE) explores some implications of the […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 15: the ‘meaningful vote’

The latest in the series of LSE Continental Breakfasts – discussions held under Chatham House rules – tackled the issue of the Commons’ role in Brexit, and the ‘meaningful vote’ in particular. Oliver Garner (European University Institute) reports on the event.

On 25 November 2018, the European Council endorsed the Withdrawal Agreement between the UK and the EU – concluding the European […]

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    Resist, Rebel and Remain: the nation deserves and demands a second chance

Resist, Rebel and Remain: the nation deserves and demands a second chance

Parliament should vote down Theresa May’s Brexit deal on Tuesday. John Van Reenen (MIT/LSE) writes that while the argument for remaining in the EU is fundamentally moral and political, and not economic, it is important for lawmakers to know that Brexit will make their constituents poorer. Ultimately, however, the nation deserves and demands a second chance to stay in Europe and to forge […]

Continental Breakfast 14: Why the EU will insist that ‘Brexit means Brexit’

The EU has not given the UK what it wanted – which was free access to the Single Market without freedom of movement and the constraints of European Court of Justice rulings. This is because the EU fears that giving into the populist Euroscepticism Brexit represents would trigger a wave of further departures. Horatio Mortimer (LSE) reports on the […]

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    ‘What does Brexit mean to you?’ Introducing 5 key items from LSE Library’s current exhibition (until 14 December 2018)

‘What does Brexit mean to you?’ Introducing 5 key items from LSE Library’s current exhibition (until 14 December 2018)

The history of the UK in and out of the European Union has been a long and complex one. LSE Library has unique collections that document this history, from the archives of MPs active in the debates, to think tanks and campaigning groups arguing for and against the UK’s membership of the EU. Running until 14 December 2018, a […]

Staying in the EU would not be perfect. But it’s the best deal on offer

Is it time for Parliament to compromise and vote through May’s Brexit deal? Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE) argues that ‘no deal’ is not the only viable alternative to a deeply flawed deal. Yes, a second referendum would divide the country – but it is already divided. People are now in a better position to understand the choices on offer and […]

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    Labour’s opportunity: the party should abandon soft Brexit and back remain and reform

Labour’s opportunity: the party should abandon soft Brexit and back remain and reform

Mary Kaldor (LSE) argues that now is the moment for Labour to abandon the soft Brexit position and come out for remain and reform as part of a far-reaching deliberative exercise in both Britain and mainland Europe.

According to Theresa May, the choice is between her deal, no deal or no Brexit. But the Labour leadership still seems to think […]

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    A breakdown of EU norms and rules risks opening Pandora’s box

A breakdown of EU norms and rules risks opening Pandora’s box

The dispute between Italy and the European Commission over the Italian budget for 2019 illustrates a shift in how member states treat the obligations of EU membership. Iain Begg and Kevin Featherstone (LSE) argue that instead of using pressure from Brussels to justify difficult policy measures, countries are now picking fights with the EU to boost their domestic political standing, thereby […]

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    Cultural, administrative, and economic proximity between the UK and Canada should be good for trade

Cultural, administrative, and economic proximity between the UK and Canada should be good for trade

Economists place considerable emphasis on the role of (geographic) distance in explaining the pattern of international trading relationships. Using a metaphor from Newtonian physics, trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) between countries are often seen as being driven by the forces of gravity, encapsulated in the relative size of their markets and the distance between their economies. Moreover, as […]

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    Can Parliament be scared into submission over the Brexit deal?

Can Parliament be scared into submission over the Brexit deal?

As agreement is reached with the EU, Theresa May’s Brexit deal will come before Parliament. In this blog, Benjamin Martill (LSE) breaks down the parliamentary arithmetic and assesses her options.

My Kingdom for a Deal

Theresa May has, at long last, reached agreement with the EU on the terms of Britain’s impending withdrawal from the Union on 29 March 2019. Although […]

November 16th, 2018|#LSEThinks, UK politics|1 Comment|