#LSEThinks

By LSE authors

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    The Brexit vote was driven by the losers of globalisation, but that’s hardly the whole story

The Brexit vote was driven by the losers of globalisation, but that’s hardly the whole story

On the second anniversary of the Brexit vote, there is hardly any further clarity on how a whole host of issues will be resolved. Some say we are in what Gramsci called “interregnum” – a period of uncertainty during which the old system or order is dying and the new has yet to emerge. Below, Armine Ishkanian (LSE) discusses the […]

Keeping zero tariffs is good economics, but the EU’s political interest matters too

Tariffs are a key element in any trade deal negotiated between the EU and the UK. Ozlem Taytas Ozturk (LSE) explains why and writes that while a zero tariff arrangement is in the economic interests of all the business sectors involved, the final deal may be swayed by politics. The EU may impose some tariffs in order to discourage […]

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    Europe’s Brexit: a successful outcome of negotiations for all?

Europe’s Brexit: a successful outcome of negotiations for all?

In writing about his recently edited book, Europe’s Brexit: EU Perspectives on Britain’s Vote to Leave, Tim Oliver draws out several key themes about how the other 27 Member States and EU institutions approached and continue to handle Brexit. The book’s major contribution is that it provides evidence about what would be a successful Brexit for all the parties […]

Clean break? Why the Sanitary and Phytosanitary framework matters

After Brexit, Britain wants to be able to diverge from the EU’s Sanitary and Phytosanitary frameworks so as to negotiate new trade deals. But to sell into the Single Market, the UK will have to continue to meet EU standards. Nazlı Gül Uysal (LSE) examines how the government has tackled this conundrum.

Trade in agri-food between the UK and the EU is a […]

Powerless to resist: Canute, Brexit and the tides of political pressure

Canute tried to hold back the waves; David Cameron tried to hold back the discontent within and outside his party. Neither succeeded. Will Jennings (University of Southampton) and Martin Lodge (LSE) analyse why the referendum was called and the often contradictory impulses it unleashed.

King Canute’s attempts to hold back the waves are a frequent allusion in debates as to whether individual […]

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    People’s vote: what would a serious Brexit referendum look like?

People’s vote: what would a serious Brexit referendum look like?

A number of things were wrong with the 2016 referendum, including the  disenfranchisement of key stakeholders and the extent of misinformation by both sides. Given that referendums should be informed exercises in democratic decision-making, Bruce Ackerman (Yale) and Sir Julian Le Grand (LSE) explain how a referendum on the deal should look like.

We are moving to a world where the decisions […]

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    Book Review: Brexit and Beyond: Rethinking the Futures of Europe edited by Benjamin Martill and Uta Staiger

Book Review: Brexit and Beyond: Rethinking the Futures of Europe edited by Benjamin Martill and Uta Staiger

In Brexit and Beyond: Rethinking the Futures of Europe, editors Benjamin Martill and Uta Staiger bring together contributors to consider the possible implications of Brexit for the futures of Europe and the European Union. Available to download here, the book’s interdisciplinary approach makes clear the difficulties of predicting the potential outcomes of an unfolding process while nonetheless outlining a number of different scenarios and possibilities in […]

Outside the Single Market, what kind of deal can Britain’s services sector hope for?

Professional and business services account for more than a tenth of the UK economy. Leaving the single market means it will no longer enjoy the passporting rights that give the financial sector smooth access to EU markets. John Catalfamo and Laura Arts (LSE) look at the limited options available to Theresa May as she tries to reconcile Brexiters’ demands for regulatory autonomy with […]

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    Britain continues to make a mess of Brexit, but the EU has mishandled it too

Britain continues to make a mess of Brexit, but the EU has mishandled it too

Britain continues to make a mess of Brexit, but the EU’s record also needs to be put under the spotlight. In this post, Tim Oliver (EUI/LSE) looks at what the EU has been accused of getting wrong in how it has handled the practical challenges of Brexit.

Brexit can easily be seen as a long list of mistakes on the part of the United Kingdom. […]

Can the Eurozone be more democratic?

How the eurozone will be governed in the future is a matter of much debate and is expected to form a key part of the European Council meeting in June. Kevin Featherstone argues that the debate is neglecting a key set of questions: how can its governance be made more democratic and accountable? The answers to these questions will […]