By LSE authors

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    Watch: Tony Travers on what Brexit means for parties, the civil service and voters

Watch: Tony Travers on what Brexit means for parties, the civil service and voters

Tony Travers, Director of the Institute of Public Affairs at the LSE, examines the impact of Brexit on the political parties, on the civil service and more broadly on the electorate.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of the LSE Brexit blog, nor the LSE.

Keeping freedom of movement is the top Brexit priority for young people

What are young people’s priorities in the Brexit negotiations? In focus groups held around the country, Shakuntala Banaji and Sam Mejias (LSE) found a majority want to keep the right to freedom of movement and maintain trade links with Europe. They also complained about the lack of political education in British schools, which they felt left adults ill-prepared to vote.

Young people in our focus […]

Young people are highly critical of Brexit and fear the insularity it could bring

Most young people did not support Brexit and the referendum result left many feeling frustrated and disempowered, write Shakuntala Banaji  and Sam Mejias (LSE). They fear the vote will make the UK more insular and are highly critical of the way the campaign was conducted. In focus groups, they showed a strong understanding of the EU – and want a […]

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    Passporting remains the best option for UK financial services industry post-Brexit – or New York may have the last laugh

Passporting remains the best option for UK financial services industry post-Brexit – or New York may have the last laugh

After Brexit, UK banks will lose their passporting rights — which allow financial companies authorised in the UK to sell their products across the European Union. This would damage the reputation and status of the City of London as Europe’s leading financial centre, writes John Ryan (LSE). 

Cities in the EU such as Frankfurt, Dublin or Paris are attracting some business from […]

After a period of resilience, things appear to be turning sour for the UK economy

Eighteen months on from the referendum, it is still far from clear what effect the Leave decision has had and, more importantly, will have on the British economy. Although the worst excesses of ‘project fear’ have justifiably been debunked, writes Iain Begg (LSE), recent indicators suggest the UK economy has been less resilient than it first appeared.

In the second […]

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    Immobility and support for Leave: Brexit was partly a reaction to change from the locally rooted

Immobility and support for Leave: Brexit was partly a reaction to change from the locally rooted

Popular explanations of the Brexit vote have centred on the division between cosmopolitan internationalists who voted Remain, and geographically-rooted individuals who voted Leave. Katy Morris, Neil Lee, and Thomas Kemeny (LSE) write that residential immobility also matters. They explain why those living in their county of birth were more likely to support Leave. However, the impact of immobility was […]

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    5 Recommended Readings on European Integration in the Age of Brexit

5 Recommended Readings on European Integration in the Age of Brexit

For the first time, following the UK ‘Brexit’ vote, the European Union could decrease its number of member states. Having grown from 6 to 28 members, enlargement has been the norm in the history of the EU. This phenomenon of countries coming together has been studied by a number of scholars who have put forward different theories as to […]

Brexit readiness score update: UK gets 22 out of 100

In the past three months, the possibility of an orderly Brexit has increased markedly, writes Simeon Djankov (LSE). He now estimates the Brexit readiness score at 22 out of 100.

In the past three months, the possibility of an orderly Brexit has increased markedly. In particular, the European Union and the United Kingdom have negotiated a transition period lasting two years. […]

LSE Brexit in 2017: the editors’ pick

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    The blue passport is the symbol of all that the UK is giving up

The blue passport is the symbol of all that the UK is giving up

Rejoice! Brexit doesn’t just mean getting our country back from the stranglehold of the EU. Brexit will also mean the return of the tangible symbol of what it means to be British: the blue passport. Eleanor Knott (LSE) writes that blue passports are meaningful outside the EU, too. In Moldova, the blue passport symbolises a world in which Moldovan citizens were unable […]

December 22nd, 2017|By LSE authors, Culture|1 Comment|