By LSE authors

Video: Brexit in the City

Brexit is likely to diminish the status of the City as the euro area’s financial centre. Even so, neither the UK nor the euro area will be shielded from a crisis that will strike the other. Hence, it is doubtful that the Brexit in the City can be clean and hard. This LSE Lecture on Brexit in the City is given by Waltraud Schelkle […]

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    UK Permanent Residence: where can EU students get information?

UK Permanent Residence: where can EU students get information?

The issue of Comprehensive Sickness Insurance (CSI) and residency for EU students has become a focal point following the outcome of the Brexit referendum. Bethan Ovens has been advising on the requirements for CSI in relation to dual-EU/Non-EU nationals accessing their right of free movement for five years at the LSE. She writes that dual-EU/Non-EU students often do not have the […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 1: What can we expect from Brexit negotiations?

In the first of LSE’s Continental Breakfasts – held under Chatham House rules, so participants can speak as freely as they wish – a roundtable discussed the immediate challenges facing the UK as it triggers Article 50. Robert van Geffen distills some of the key points.

Once Article 50 is triggered, the European Council will meet to issue guidelines […]

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    Brexit should make it easier to address the Eurozone’s challenges

Brexit should make it easier to address the Eurozone’s challenges

Annette Bongardt and Francisco Torres recall that the Eurozone risked seeing its legitimate efforts to strengthen the EMU vetoed by the UK, a country with a derogation from the monetary union. They argue that had ‘Remain’ won, the prospects for completing and sustaining the EMU would have worsened and dissatisfaction with the EU would have increased. In their view, […]

Video: Brexit and Migration

Why is EU migration so controversial? Will EU citizens be able to stay in the UK post-Brexit? What controls on future EU migration are likely? In this LSE Lecture, Philippe Legrain and Patrick McGovern explain.

This post gives the views of its authors, not the position of LSE Brexit or the London School of Economics. 

Philippe Legrain, LSE European Institute

Patrick McGovern, LSE Sociology

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    LSE Growth Commission: despite Brexit, the UK should stay open to international talent

LSE Growth Commission: despite Brexit, the UK should stay open to international talent

As a Research Economist at LSE’s Growth Commission, Anna Valero spent part of the post-Brexit months studying the gaps between public policy and the new economic reality in the UK.  In an interview with LSE Business Review’s managing editor, Helena Vieira, she discusses what the UK could do stimulate economic growth and fight inequality. The skills gap is one of her key points, […]

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    Brexit cowardice and Colombian courage: a tale of two referenda

Brexit cowardice and Colombian courage: a tale of two referenda

The divergent reactions of Britain’s Theresa May and Colombia’s Juan Manuel Santos to crucial yet dysfunctional referenda reveal a great deal about the nature of democracy and leadership today, writes Jean-Paul Faguet.

2016 served up two extraordinary referenda, fought under similar conditions, and with similar results, but which led to remarkably different outcomes.

FARC guerrillas on the move (INSS, public domain)

Here in Britain, […]

Off the top of your head: LSE vox pop on Brexit

LSESU Politics and Forum Society have asked LSE students what they think about Brexit. How has the government handled it so far? How has the vote affected student’s lives? Should Scotland become independent as a result? Should there be a second EU Referendum?

LSESU Politics & Forum is LSESU’s official politics society. The society was created by merging the lsesu forum (LSESU’s Best New […]

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    Will Labour’s ‘six tests’ hold the government to account on the UK’s Brexit deal?

Will Labour’s ‘six tests’ hold the government to account on the UK’s Brexit deal?

With Article 50 triggered, Kate Alexander Shaw analyses the Labour Party’s ‘six tests for Brexit’, arguing that they may let the government off the hook rather than holding them to account over the UK’s final EU deal.

 

So the Brexit negotiation begins, and battle lines are being drawn for the coming two years. To that end, the Labour Party has […]

What would a pro-European hard Brexit look like?

Like it or not, Britain is leaving the single market. But there is still plenty to play for, argues Simon Hix. With a deep and comprehensive free trade agreement, we could limit the economic damage. This probably means accepting some EU regulatory standards and devising a scheme to allow EU citizens to work in the UK (and vice versa) if […]