By LSE authors

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    What makes Britain ‘Great’? The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism

What makes Britain ‘Great’? The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism

The Leave and Remain campaigns defined British ‘greatness’ in very different ways. The referendum reflects more than attitudes toward EU membership — it  marks a new understanding of Britain’s role in the world, argues Benjamin Martill (LSE). The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism has important implications and needs to be taken seriously.

The ‘Great’ in Great Britain is a geographical […]

‘Swallow the lot, and swallow it now’: Britain is, and was, deluded about its negotiating power with the EU

Britain is making the same mistake about the EU now as Harold Macmillan did about the European Community in the 1960s, writes Piers Ludlow (LSE). Personal appeals to Général de Gaulle proved fruitless. The EU27 are unbending – not because they bear ill-will towards the British for voting to leave, but because the nature of the EU demands internal […]

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    Understanding the motivations of Leave voters will play an important role in determining the future of globalisation

Understanding the motivations of Leave voters will play an important role in determining the future of globalisation

Since World War II the global economy has become increasingly integrated. Brexit runs counter to this trend and has ignited a debate about the future of the EU and the global economy. In a recent paper, Thomas Sampson (LSE Centre for Economic Performance) discusses why the UK voted to leave and what this tells us about the future of globalisation. He argues […]

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    The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in prices, especially food

Since the referendum, UK inflation has risen faster than that of the Eurozone. Price rises have varied across sectors, but Josh De Lyon, Swati Dhingra, and Stephen Machin (LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance) show that the rise in the growth rate of food prices has been particularly pronounced. As a result, real wage growth in the UK has again turned negative. 

The pattern […]

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    Shami Chakrabarti: “Not guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals isn’t politics – it’s cruelty”

Shami Chakrabarti: “Not guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals isn’t politics – it’s cruelty”

In October 2016, the leader of the UK’s Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, appointed Shami Chakrabarti as Shadow Attorney General for England and Wales. In a discussion with British Politics and Policy editors Artemis Photiadou and Tena Prelec, she reflects on the challenges and advantages of the position, the situation faced by EU citizens living in the UK, and the key issues on the horizon for […]

Brexit is dividing our society like never before

The furore over a Tory MP sending a letter to all university vice chancellors asking for the names of those teaching about Brexit, accompanied by a request to see their teaching materials, has shown how toxic Brexit is as an issue, and how this translates into academic freedom on matters European, writes Kevin Featherstone (LSE European Institute).

So, why did Chris […]

A German ‘Jamaica’ coalition will hinder Eurozone reform, but make little difference to Brexit

Angela Merkel cannot govern alone. John Ryan (LSE) explores the difficult task she faces in pulling together a coalition, which will probably be a three-way affair between the CDU/CSU, the Greens and the FDP – a so-called ‘Jamaica’ coalition. Emmanuel Macron’s plans to reform the Eurozone are likely to prove a flashpoint. But the arrival of Merkel’s governing […]

Unlike Brexit, the Catalonian independence movement is very pro-EU. But will the EU accept it?

The crisis in Catalonia has thrown into a sharp relief the choice facing the European Union, writes Joan Costa i Font (LSE). Spain should quickly offer a binding referendum on Catalonian independence. If Catalonians reject an EU-backed offer, there could be an orderly secession. The Catalonian independence movement is not like Brexit: most Catalonian parties are keen to be part […]

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    Britain’s approach to Brexit is a textbook example of failed strategic thinking

Britain’s approach to Brexit is a textbook example of failed strategic thinking

Prime Minister Theresa May’s speech in Florence was intended to move forward stalled Brexit negotiations. But as Tim Oliver (LSE/EUI) argues, Britain has found itself running into numerous problems with Brexit because its strategy for exiting the EU has been a textbook example of failed strategic thinking.

It’s said that in the First World War the Germans viewed the British troops […]

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    The Catalan crisis and Brexit stem from the same kind of nationalism

The Catalan crisis and Brexit stem from the same kind of nationalism

Many observers now expect the Catalan government to make a declaration of independence following the 1 October referendum, but what implications would there be for Catalonia if it did become independent? Paul De Grauwe (LSE) argues that there are parallels between the Catalan independence movement and other forms of nationalism in Europe. He suggests that such political movements present a […]