By LSE authors

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    Parliament has a strong and clear mandate for Brexit, Remainers and EU politicians shouldn’t question it

Parliament has a strong and clear mandate for Brexit, Remainers and EU politicians shouldn’t question it

The recent general election gave the UK Parliament a strong and clear popular mandate for delivering Brexit. Annette Bongardt and Francisco Torres emphasise that with more than 85 per cent of the vote on a clear Brexit platform (Conservatives, Labour, UKIP) – promising to respect the Brexit referendum result – not only the new government but indeed almost the entire […]

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    The net migration target is one of the strangest political fetishes in recent history

The net migration target is one of the strangest political fetishes in recent history

The net migration target is one of the strangest political fetishes of modern political history, writes Jonathan Wadsworth. He argues that it is far from obvious why any government would seek to target something over which it has very little control. Even if migration from the EU fell to zero, the net migration numbers would be way above the […]

Hopes of a softer Brexit are probably in vain – though I’d love to be proved wrong

Are we heading for a softer Brexit after the Conservatives’ electoral setback? Piers Ludlow doubts it. There is little to suggest voters were warning Theresa May off a hard Brexit. The Cabinet reshuffle is unlikely to tip the balance, and even if she returns from Brussels with a softer deal it is far from clear that Labour would back […]

Breaking up families is easy to do: family reunification post-Brexit

Will EU citizens living in the UK be able to keep the rights they have enjoyed up to now? Or will the UK’s unusually harsh family reunification laws apply to them? Katya Ivanova (left) and Georgiana Turculet predict that the Brexit negotiations will reignite domestic debates around citizens’ core family rights. The authors outline four possible outcomes of the negotiations. […]

If May fights on, a hard Brexit is inevitable. Only Boris Johnson might avert it

If Theresa May manages to carry on as Prime Minister, her precarious position within the Conservative Party and in Parliament will leave her a weaker negotiator. Kevin Featherstone argues that if she fights on – and either returns from Brussels without a deal, or is ousted after failing to secure an acceptable one – Tory party politics make a hard Brexit inevitable. Were Boris Johnson […]

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    What if the UK were to break up? A closer look at an English foreign policy

What if the UK were to break up? A closer look at an English foreign policy

If the UK were to break up then how might a post-UK England relate to the rest of the British Isles, Europe, and the wider world? Will the end of the UK produce a reduced and angry ‘Little England’ or might continuity prevail and the world find itself dealing with a ‘Little Britain’? Tim Oliver considers some of the […]

Investment banks are already leaving London. Other jobs will follow

The Brexit exodus is already happening. Investment banks have announced plans to relocate jobs from London to Frankfurt and Dublin, and Warsaw is also likely to benefit. With 8% of the UK’s GDP coming from banking and finance, warns Simeon Djankov, the knock-on effects on other sectors – retail, education, entertainment and transport – will be considerable.

In May 2017, new […]

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    After Brexit, Londoners might feel little obligation to remain a part of the UK or England

After Brexit, Londoners might feel little obligation to remain a part of the UK or England

In this post, Tim Oliver considers how London is talked about in UK politics, how we can assess claims that London has become too powerful and distinct from the rest of the UK, and how London’s place in the UK can be managed. He suggests that there are three broad approaches that can be taken to the ‘London question’: […]

British voters prefer EU to non-EU migrants

Despite the argument that Brexit was about sovereignty and only secondarily about immigration, new data suggest otherwise. Simon Hix, Eric Kaufmann, and Thomas J. Leeper show the importance of reducing immigration levels – especially from outside the EU – to British voters.

Brexit leaders such as Boris Johnson have maintained a narrative that sovereignty, not immigration, was the key motivation […]

Brexit has already started to make UK citizens poorer

Leaving the European Union with no deal in place for future trading arrangements would be the worst-case Brexit scenario for the UK economy. What’s more, just because GDP growth has not declined since last year’s referendum, it would be wrong to think that Brexit is yet to have any economic effects: it has already lowered UK living standards by […]