Campaigns

Brexit and the mainstreaming of the British far right

In an extract from his new book English Uprising: Brexit and the Mainstreaming of the Far Right, Paul Stocker (Teesside University) looks at the role Vote Leave’s inaccurate claim that Turkey was about to join the EU, and its ‘Breaking Point’ poster, had on the tone of the referendum campaign. It sought to link immigration with terrorism, and in particular with […]

The EU referendum was gerrymandered

In an extract from his new book, Democracy and Its Crisis, AC Grayling (New College of the Humanities) argues that MPs were made aware the referendum result was non-binding. In addition, the franchise deliberately excluded groups with a direct interest in the result. Only 37% of those eligible to vote in the referendum backed Brexit. The EU referendum, he […]

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    EU membership was a cultural symbol which Remainers approved and Leavers disliked

EU membership was a cultural symbol which Remainers approved and Leavers disliked

Provision of more facts and objective information would have been of marginal significance in the Brexit vote. Michael Cunningham (University of Wolverhampton) offers his reflections on the EU referendum that point to the existence of substantial political limitations of evidence. He argues that one observes a widespread tendency among many voters to be resistant to facts challenging positions they hold. […]

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    ‘The brightest and best’, us – and the rest: desirable and undesirable migration in EU referendum leaflets

‘The brightest and best’, us – and the rest: desirable and undesirable migration in EU referendum leaflets

How did the leaflets circulated before the EU referendum talk about migrants? Alexandra Bulat (UCL SSEES) examines the LSE’s collection and finds – on both sides – a distinction between ‘desirable’ and ‘undesirable’ migrants, whether from within or outside the EU. At no point were the views of the migrants themselves heard.

Researchers agree that immigration, alongside economics, were the […]

September 15th, 2017|Campaigns, Featured, Migration|0 Comments|

What does respecting the referendum result mean?

 The Leave campaign – just like Donald Trump’s bid for the presidency – was based on a false prospectus. To respect the referendum result means to accept this as normal, writes Simon Wren-Lewis (Oxford University). It is not. Those who voted for a fall in immigration and more money for the NHS will not get them. That is why it […]

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    Practice makes perfect: how the Leave campaigns dominated Twitter in the EU referendum

Practice makes perfect: how the Leave campaigns dominated Twitter in the EU referendum

Twitter was a crucial campaigning platform ahead of Brexit. Simon Usherwood looks at its use by campaigners and places their efforts in a broader context. He explains that since the 1970s, politicians did not actively promote the benefits of being in the EU, leaving it to eurosceptics to promote their own agenda. This focus meant that in 2016, those […]

The Brexit referendum question was flawed in its design

The Brexit referendum question was flawed in its design by ignoring Kenneth Arrow’s impossibility theorem. Thomas Colignatus explains why.

Theresa May’s government, with support from the UK Parliament, has adopted Brexit as its policy aim and has invoked Article 50. Yet, economic theory assumes rational agents, and even governments might be open for rational reconsideration.

The unsatisfactory referendum question
Based upon voting […]

Acrimonious and divisive: the role the media played in Brexit

Britain’s media is highly partisan, and this was more apparent than ever in the run-up to the EU referendum. In this extract from a report on media coverage of the campaign, Martin Moore (left) and Gordon Ramsay explain how the Leave campaign styled Remain’s warnings about the effects of Brexit as ‘Project Fear’, accusing ‘experts’ arguing for the status quo of self-interest […]

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    Listen to Matthew Goodwin, Simona Guerra, James Ball & Marta Lorimer discuss why Leave won

Listen to Matthew Goodwin, Simona Guerra, James Ball & Marta Lorimer discuss why Leave won

On 27 April, Matthew Goodwin (left) introduced his new book, Brexit: Why Britain Voted to Leave the European Union at the LSE’s Wolfson Theatre. Joining the discussion about what drove the Leave vote, Euroscepticism in France and the implications for the general election were Simona Guerra of the University of Leicester, BuzzFeed’s James Ball and Marta Lorimer from the […]

Why Britain voted to Leave (and what Boris Johnson had to do with it)

Some Leavers claim the referendum result was not primarily about immigration, but anxiety about Britain’s perceived loss of sovereignty to the EU. In their new book, Harold D. Clarke, Matthew Goodwin (left) and Paul Whiteley draw on data about more than 150,000 voters to analyse the factors and concerns that led people to vote Leave. The mix of calculations, emotions and cues […]