Campaigns

Acrimonious and divisive: the role the media played in Brexit

Britain’s media is highly partisan, and this was more apparent than ever in the run-up to the EU referendum. In this extract from a report on media coverage of the campaign, Martin Moore (left) and Gordon Ramsay explain how the Leave campaign styled Remain’s warnings about the effects of Brexit as ‘Project Fear’, accusing ‘experts’ arguing for the status quo of self-interest […]

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    Listen to Matthew Goodwin, Simona Guerra, James Ball & Marta Lorimer discuss why Leave won

Listen to Matthew Goodwin, Simona Guerra, James Ball & Marta Lorimer discuss why Leave won

On 27 April, Matthew Goodwin (left) introduced his new book, Brexit: Why Britain Voted to Leave the European Union at the LSE’s Wolfson Theatre. Joining the discussion about what drove the Leave vote, Euroscepticism in France and the implications for the general election were Simona Guerra of the University of Leicester, BuzzFeed’s James Ball and Marta Lorimer from the […]

Why Britain voted to Leave (and what Boris Johnson had to do with it)

Some Leavers claim the referendum result was not primarily about immigration, but anxiety about Britain’s perceived loss of sovereignty to the EU. In their new book, Harold D. Clarke, Matthew Goodwin (left) and Paul Whiteley draw on data about more than 150,000 voters to analyse the factors and concerns that led people to vote Leave. The mix of calculations, emotions and cues […]

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    Book Review: Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation

Book Review: Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation

In Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation, Andrew Glencross offers an analysis of ‘Brexit’: the UK referendum vote on 23 June 2016 to leave the European Union. While the pace of developments since the book’s publication make some of its observations inevitably prematurely obsolete, this remains an important and historically sensitive account of this momentous event in the […]

‘Legsit’ is no joke. It’s symptomatic of a reactionary Brexit political culture

The Daily Mail’s ‘Legsit’ headline was defended as ‘only a joke’. Not so, writes Roberta Guerrina: it is symptomatic of a political environment in which women politicians are forced to prove their femininity and forces opposed to progressive politics – like the Mail – are newly emboldened. The Great Repeal Bill gives government the chance to roll back EU […]

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    Brexit, competition and markets: there’s a need to spread the benefits of growth

Brexit, competition and markets: there’s a need to spread the benefits of growth

London and the South-East plus metropolitan and major university towns are markedly more pro-market and pro-competition than much of the rest of the UK. This is reflected in the geographical pattern of Brexit referendum results. In this post, Jon Stern examines the future of competition policies, as well as the perceptions of fairness and legitimacy of pro-market competition and industrial policies […]

‘The public mood could change’: Q&A with Roland Rudd, chair of Open Britain

Among the groups campaigning against a hard Brexit, Open Britain is among the best-resourced. But their impact on public opinion and the government’s negotiating stance has so far been minimal. LSE Brexit co-editor Ros Taylor asked the chair of Open Britain, Roland Rudd, about the campaign’s strategy.

It’s March 2019 and we’ve just crashed out of the EU without a trade or transitional deal. […]

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    More positive, assertive and forward-looking: how Leave won Twitter

More positive, assertive and forward-looking: how Leave won Twitter

How did people talk about the EU referendum on Twitter? Akitaka Matsuo and Kenneth Benoit (left) analysed 23m tweets about Brexit, and found salient differences between Leave and Remain supporters. People who backed Leave were more likely to use positive, assertive and forward-looking language. They also tended to follow politicians and campaigning accounts, while Remain supporters were more likely to follow […]

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    The Brexit debate through social media: deliberative discussion, or deliberate dysfunction?

The Brexit debate through social media: deliberative discussion, or deliberate dysfunction?

Using over 35m tweets collected in the year before the Brexit referendum, Ken Benoit analyses the debate and campaign through social media to track the framing, the argumentation, and the patterns of communication about the issues and consequences of the vote. LSE academics Sara Hobolt, Jennifer Jackson Preece and Jean-Christophe Plantin contribute to the discussion. You can also watch the slides with […]

The British Asian vote for Brexit contains a few surprises

Months on from the EU referendum, our understanding of the Leave vote is still patchy in certain areas. We’ve learnt that older people and the less affluent were more likely to choose Brexit, but we know less about how the vote broke down in ethnic terms. Rakib Ehsan shows that the strength of euroscepticism within the British South Asian population was perhaps […]