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    The UK may be leaving the EU, but Euro-English is here to stay

The UK may be leaving the EU, but Euro-English is here to stay

English is one of the EU’s 24 official languages and the main working language in the EU’s institutions. This is unlikely to change because of Brexit. In fact, English may come to be seen as a more neutral language because it is no longer associated with one specific member state, writes Nils Ringe (University of Wisconsin – Madison). It is likely, […]

November 12th, 2018|Culture, Featured|4 Comments|
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    Nationalism, racism, and identity: what connects Englishness to a preference for hard Brexit?

Nationalism, racism, and identity: what connects Englishness to a preference for hard Brexit?

Support for Brexit was higher among those who identify as English rather than British, even after accounting for relevant economic factors. But what is it that connects English identity to a preference for Brexit? Anthony Heath and Lindsay Richards outline some key characteristics that go some way in explaining the association.

‘Identity politics’ is a phrase that can be heard […]

November 8th, 2018|Culture, Featured|12 Comments|

One country? No: Northern Ireland has always been treated differently

The DUP’s struggle to prevent special status for Northern Ireland has shaped Brexit negotiations for months, writes Duncan Morrow (Ulster University). At the heart of the DUP’s position is a single, apparently obvious demand: ‘We joined as one country and we will leave as one country’. On the surface, the logic seems impeccable: different treatment within the UK as […]

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    The Brexit vote and Trump’s election were decided democratically. So why don’t they feel that way?

The Brexit vote and Trump’s election were decided democratically. So why don’t they feel that way?

The Brexit referendum and Trump’s election were each decided by a free and fair vote, yet large proportions of UK and US citizens have trouble accepting them as truly “democratic.” A working democracy requires more than free elections; it requires additional institutions, such as well-functioning political public sphere and a responsive political party system, to channel citizens’ voices into […]

November 6th, 2018|Culture, Featured|2 Comments|

Universities are a bargaining chip in the Brexit free-trade future

Higher education – although clearly not a government priority – is becoming a bargaining chip as the UK considers its future outside the EU. Anne Corbett (LSE) examines the May government’s proposal to treat higher education as a sweetener for free trade deals, an idea that is likely to have life in it whatever the immediate Brexit outcome.

Spare a thought […]

Great Yarmouth: stories of frustration, hope and Brexit

Great Yarmouth voted to leave in 2016 by a majority of 71.5%. The following year Janosch Prinz (University of East Anglia) talked to some of its residents about their disillusionment with the local economy, a lost sense of pride in their community and country and a sense that EU bureaucracy was hampering the UK.

Great Yarmouth, sitting between the North […]

Seven rules for getting Brexit-talk right

Despite protestations to the contrary, it’s clear that the process of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU has not been going to plan. It’s time we discussed ‘How (not) to talk about Brexit.’ Tim Oliver (University of Loughborough) suggests seven rules.

Britain’s vote to leave the EU has led to a flood of books, articles, blog posts, and more than enough […]

October 26th, 2018|Culture, Featured|8 Comments|

Leave-voting men, Brexit and the ‘crisis of masculinity’

Brexit may have been driven by those ‘left behind’ by globalisation, automation, the evolution of manufacturing, and the increased inequality of both income and wealth. Some have suggested that this feeling of being ‘left behind’ is exacerbated for working-class white men, in declining industrial and disadvantaged areas in particular. Julie MacLeavy (University of Bristol) draws on research with Leave voters in […]

October 24th, 2018|Culture, Featured|7 Comments|
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    Book Review: Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world by Adam Tooze (Part 2)

Book Review: Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world by Adam Tooze (Part 2)

In Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world, author Adam Tooze proposes a remarkably consistent narrative of the 2008 financial crisis and its political, geopolitical consequences — one that attempts a coherent interpretation of the global and European crises. In part two of his review of this seminal work, Shahin Vallée examines Tooze’s take on the crisis of transatlantic finance and the existential crisis for Europe […]

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    Remainer or Leaver? The emergence of the Brexit identity prism

Remainer or Leaver? The emergence of the Brexit identity prism

Britons used to identify as supporters of a political party. Now they are more likely to identify themselves as a ‘Remainer’ or a ‘Leaver’. Ian Montagu (ScotCen) looks at the challenges this new political divide presents as Britain prepares to leave the EU.

The past half-century has seen a more or less continuous decline in the number of voters who […]