Culture

To Brussels via Rome: how Eurosceptical are British Christians?

Catholics tend to have a more positive view of the EU than other Christians, write Ekaterina Kolpinskaya (Swansea University) and Stuart Fox (Cardiff University), who have analysed Euroscepticism among different denominations. The religious are more likely to be Eurosceptic, with members of the Church of England and Presbyterians especially so. The authors attribute these differences to a deep-rooted suspicion of supranational institutions […]

October 10th, 2017|Culture, Featured|5 Comments|
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    The Catalan crisis and Brexit stem from the same kind of nationalism

The Catalan crisis and Brexit stem from the same kind of nationalism

Many observers now expect the Catalan government to make a declaration of independence following the 1 October referendum, but what implications would there be for Catalonia if it did become independent? Paul De Grauwe (LSE) argues that there are parallels between the Catalan independence movement and other forms of nationalism in Europe. He suggests that such political movements present a […]

Brexit and the mainstreaming of the British far right

In an extract from his new book English Uprising: Brexit and the Mainstreaming of the Far Right, Paul Stocker (Teesside University) looks at the role Vote Leave’s inaccurate claim that Turkey was about to join the EU, and its ‘Breaking Point’ poster, had on the tone of the referendum campaign. It sought to link immigration with terrorism, and in particular with […]

If you didn’t laugh, you’d cry … Brexit and the renaissance of British humour

It would be unbearable if it weren’t so amusing … John Ryan (LSE Ideas) says the desire to salvage some comic value from the Brexit negotiations, and the chief political players, has inspired plenty of satire – something the British have long excelled at. Even the more arcane elements of British comedy have found an appreciative audience in continental Europe.

The referendum was won […]

Freedom in the skies: secondary mobility and Brexit

The right to move and work freely in the EU is a key point of contestation in the Brexit negotiations. But what effect will leaving the EU have on the ways and means in which EU migrants keep in touch with their relatives? Kathy Burrell (University of Liverpool) and Matt Badcock (Leeds Beckett University) explore the virtual and physical […]

The Prime Minister has confirmed that Brexit is a step towards irrelevance

The medieval economy of Plantagenet England depended a great deal upon trade with the Republic of Florence for its vitality. During the 14th and 15th centuries, Italian textiles, dyes, raw materials and garments infused new life into an economy still reeling from the effects of the Black Death. It was auspicious that the Prime Minister should choose Florence as the location for […]

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    For many individuals, the prospect of Brexit has caused genuine suffering

For many individuals, the prospect of Brexit has caused genuine suffering

The experience of Brexit appears to be one of real individual anxiety and pain set against a prospective, and increasingly unlikely, collective gain. Henry Radice, from the Department of International Development, writes that this is the case for both non-British EU citizens resident in the UK, and the many British EU citizens who cherish and benefit from that extra layer of democratic […]

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    EU membership was a cultural symbol which Remainers approved and Leavers disliked

EU membership was a cultural symbol which Remainers approved and Leavers disliked

Provision of more facts and objective information would have been of marginal significance in the Brexit vote. Michael Cunningham (University of Wolverhampton) offers his reflections on the EU referendum that point to the existence of substantial political limitations of evidence. He argues that one observes a widespread tendency among many voters to be resistant to facts challenging positions they hold. […]

How the EU shapes and hones its identity through the language of its treaties

How does the European Union shape and hone its identity? Odelia Oshri and Shaul Shenhav (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) decipher the ways in which the EU’s discourse on values has changed throughout the 60 years of integration. They show that two values dominated the Union’s treaty texts – ‘democracy’ and ‘market economy’. However, since the 1990s, new values have penetrated the […]

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    Generation Brexit: a chance for Millennials to have their say on Brexit

Generation Brexit: a chance for Millennials to have their say on Brexit

The London School of Economics (LSE) has launched an exciting initiative which seeks to discover what young adults aged 16–35 want from Brexit. Apart from English, it is now available in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Polish, and Greek.  The Generation Brexit project is gathering young people’s attitudes towards Brexit, in order to ensure their proper representation in the process. […]