Economics of Brexit

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    The Commonwealth advantage: trading with the bloc offers buoyant economic prospects

The Commonwealth advantage: trading with the bloc offers buoyant economic prospects

One of Brexit’s potential advantages is the UK’s freedom to negotiate its own trade deals instead of being dependent on the EU. Of course, trade will continue with the EU after Brexit, probably little changed, and there is little doubt that the EU will continue to be a major trading partner after Brexit. But it is widely expected that […]

EU students at UK universities: patterns and trends

What Brexit will mean for UK universities varies from institution to institution. Much data on Brexit’s impact focuses on sector-wide aggregates, the forest that hides the trees. The UK provides excellent teaching and research, as illustrated by the number of its universities ranked in the top 10, 50 or 100 in the world. Yet despite its world-class reputation, the UK’s […]

EFTA’s model of compliance would struggle to accommodate the UK

Would the Norway model mean the UK was subject to the rulings of a foreign court? Morten Kinander (Norwegian Business School) responds to Øyvind Bø’s recent post for LSE Brexit. Yes, EFTA states are subject to the decisions of their Surveillance Authorities, but they are not formally bound by them in the sense that the state is subject to sanctions. This is […]

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    Britain is already paying a price for voting to leave the EU

Britain is already paying a price for voting to leave the EU

The full economic consequences of Brexit will not be realised for many years. But 21 months after the referendum, we can start to assess how the Brexit vote has impacted the British economy. Thomas Sampson (LSE’s CEP) summarises what we know so far.

Brexit is yet to happen, but the economic effects of voting to leave are already being felt. How is it possible for the […]

How trade unions are mobilising around the challenges of Brexit

Not all trade unionists wanted to stay in the EU. Nonetheless, Brexit poses a number of challenges for the labour movement. Steve French (Keele University) looks at the three areas on which unions plan to campaign – the regional and sectoral impacts of leaving the EU, and the risk that future free trade agreements will be negotiated with corporate rather […]

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    Michael Gove’s agricultural utopia ignores the realities of UK farming

Michael Gove’s agricultural utopia ignores the realities of UK farming

Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Michael Gove has said that Britain should be ‘competing at the top’ in agricultural policy after Brexit, maintaining high animal welfare and environmental standards. Charlie Cadywould (Policy Network) argues that a race to the bottom is inevitable if the aims of hard Brexiters are to be realised.
Michael Gove is a man who […]

The Common Agricultural Policy is dead: long live the BAP

We have had 45 years of the Common Agricultural Policy. What will the BAP (British Agricultural Policy) look like? Richard Byrne (Harper Adams University) looks at how the CAP outgrew its original purpose of ensuring food security to become a wider land management programme. In fact, it was the UK’s 1986 Agricultural Act that led the way in agri-environmental […]

Sub-national government can only watch and wait as Brexit grows nearer

Brexit negotiations are conducted in London and Brussels. With so much uncertainty about the final shape of any Brexit deal, and no clear immigration policy yet, local and sub-national government is finding it very hard to plan, writes Tony Travers (LSE). The trade deals the government hopes to do will affect regions in different ways – but none can […]

Why won’t the UK get a good Brexit deal on financial services? One word: Norway

When it comes to financial services, the UK will not be able to negotiate better access than Norway currently enjoys, writes Morten Kinander (Norwegian Business School). It is simply not in the EU’s interest to create a parallel equivalence regime for Britain. That is why the ‘Norway’ (EEA) model should not be ruled out. Claims that it would turn […]

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    How useful are the estimates of the economic consequences of Brexit?

How useful are the estimates of the economic consequences of Brexit?

In this blog, Josh De Lyon (LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance) discusses some of the concerns with the economic forecasts of the effects of Brexit and suggests that the available reports are informative of the likely consequences of Brexit. He also provides an insight into how such research should be interpreted, beyond the headline-grabbing figures reported in the news.

On 29 January, a new government […]