European politics

Central and Eastern Europe after Brexit: fear of domination, fear of abandonment

Where does Brexit leave Central and Eastern Europe? On the one hand, it pulls the centre of EU gravity eastwards, further away from the Atlantic. On the other, it leaves the region vulnerable on its eastern frontier. Alina Bârgăoanu (Harvard) explains why these states feel abandoned and fear domination by Germany.

The Euractiv journalist Peter Wilding should be proud: back in […]

The EU’s negotiating strategy has worked so far, but it’s playing a risky game

In a report published recently, Oliver Patel (UCL) assesses the EU’s institutional and strategic approach to the Brexit negotiations, and considers what the EU wants from the process. Here, he summarises the core points of the paper and outlines how the UK has been outflanked by the EU’s negotiating tactics thus far.

October’s European Council summit represented ‘more of the same’ for the Brexit […]

Continental Breakfast 13: Brexit’s lasting effects on the EU

The departure of the UK will have lasting effects on the European Union, which will be felt for years to come. Marcel Hadeed (LSE) reports on a lunchtime event on 1 October, 2018 jointly hosted between LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, Berlin. Where do we stand six months ahead of the British withdrawal from the EU? How do […]

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    European solidarity? Explaining EU citizens’ attitudes towards economic redistribution in the age of Brexit

European solidarity? Explaining EU citizens’ attitudes towards economic redistribution in the age of Brexit

What’s happening to European solidarity in the wake of Brexit? In this blog, Nicholas Charron and Monika Bauhr (University of Gothenburg) explains EU citizens’ attitudes towards cohesion policy. They find that less than one-half of EU citizens have even heard of the policy itself, while roughly one-third claim they have ‘benefitted from some EU project in their area’. They also observe that […]

Universities are a bargaining chip in the Brexit free-trade future

Higher education – although clearly not a government priority – is becoming a bargaining chip as the UK considers its future outside the EU. Anne Corbett (LSE) examines the May government’s proposal to treat higher education as a sweetener for free trade deals, an idea that is likely to have life in it whatever the immediate Brexit outcome.

Spare a thought […]

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    After Brexit, the UK should have a democratic right of return

After Brexit, the UK should have a democratic right of return

Many people believe that the UK’s decision to leave the EU spells trouble for both country and continent, yet by and large think that the exit vote and process, painful though they may be, adhere to the rules and spirit of democratic self-government. Peter Niesen and Markus Patberg argue that in one important respect this is not the case, since fully democratic credentials […]

‘Britzerland’: the problem of dispute resolution post-Brexit

Both the UK and Switzerland are trying to negotiate a dispute resolution mechanism that would give the European Court of Justice the final word on the interpretation of EU law. Carl Baudenbacher (Monckton Chambers and former president of the EFTA Court) looks at the inspiration for this arrangement – the EU-Ukraine Agreement – and explains why it is a […]

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    Puffer Fish and Bargaining Chips: Why hard bargaining harms British interests

Puffer Fish and Bargaining Chips: Why hard bargaining harms British interests

When it comes to Brexit, there’s no doubt that UK negotiators have adopted a hard bargaining strategy. Benjamin Martill asks whether this is the best strategy for advancing British interests.

The New Politics of Bargaining

All eyes in British politics are on the negotiations between the UK and the EU over the terms of the forthcoming British withdrawal from the Union, […]

A rational backlash against globalisation

The vote for Brexit and the election of protectionist Donald Trump to the US presidency – two momentous markers of the ongoing pushback against globalisation – led some to question the rationality of voters. Lubos Pastor and Pietro Veronesi (University of Chicago Booth School of Business) present a framework that demonstrates how the populist backlash against globalisation is actually a rational […]

Negotiating Single Market access with the EU: institutional lessons from Switzerland

Switzerland is in the midst of negotiating an institutional framework for some of its more important bilateral agreements with the EU. Laura Knöpfel (King’s College London) and Cenni Najy (University of Geneva) look at what institutional lessons can be learned for the UK as it tries to leave the EU while remaining partly in the Single Market.
Chapter 4 of […]