European politics

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    How Europe’s deteriorating peace is facilitating the rise of populism

How Europe’s deteriorating peace is facilitating the rise of populism

Results from the 2018 Global Peace Index, a quantitative measure of peace across 163 countries, show that Europe remains the most peaceful region in the world. But as José Luengo-Cabrera (Institute of Economics & Peace) notes, Europe’s peacefulness has been deteriorating in recent years. He argues that this deterioration has provided fertile ground for the rise of populist parties.

Since the […]

Austria’s EU presidency: Brexit will be on the sidelines

On 1 July, Austria took over the rotating presidency of the Council of the European Union for the third time. As Paul Schmidt notes, since the Treaty of Lisbon entered into force in December 2009, the role of the presidency has fundamentally changed. He assesses how much room for manoeuvre this leaves to make a difference, and what we […]

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    A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

The UK is set to leave the EU in March next year, but many of the key issues remain unresolved and there is now perceived to be a very real prospect of the country leaving without a deal in place. For Helmut K Anheier, the answer is not a second referendum given another vote would do little to resolve the […]

Does Brexit spell boom or doom for European integration?

So far fears that Brexit would lead to the unravelling of the EU have proved unfounded. Nevertheless, the effect of the UK’s withdrawal on the future of European integration remains open to much debate and speculation. Does Brexit spell boom or doom for European integration, asks Tim Oliver (Loughborough University London)?

Britain’s relationship with the EU and European integration has rarely been […]

What happens if the European Union falls apart

The European Union has come under intense pressure from the Eurozone crisis, the migration crisis, and Brexit, but is it at serious risk of falling apart? And if so, how would this disintegration take place? Drawing on his latest book, Hans Vollaard (Utrecht University) explains that rather than experiencing a sudden collapse, the EU might instead suffer a slow […]

British, European or an Anglophone citizen of the world? How Britons identify themselves

What makes a Briton more likely to feel European? Laurie Hanquinet (University of York) analyses a survey carried out in 2012 and finds cultural tastes, social networks and travel in Europe predispose people to identify more closely with Europe. However, Britons who travel widely outside the EU tend to identify strongly with the wider Anglophone world – something that may have […]

Soft Rock: the power shifts in Madrid and London could help Gibraltar

Gibraltar’s border with Spain, and its economic dependence on financial services, mean it has a lot to lose from a hard Brexit. Chris Grocott (University of Leicester) looks at the implications of a new Spanish government and the departures of Boris Johnson and David Davis.

June’s change in the Spanish government has been welcomed in Gibraltar. The hard-line Partido Popular has been replaced by a coalition […]

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    Two years after the vote, there is little certainty where the UK-EU relationship is heading

Two years after the vote, there is little certainty where the UK-EU relationship is heading

Two years after the vote, there is little certainty regarding the UK’s political and economic future. Brexiters themselves are split between wanting a Singapore-on-Thames or a Belarus-on-Trent. Simon Hix (LSE) assesses where the UK-EU relationship is heading. He argues that despite persisting uncertainty, a No Deal is the least-preferred option of both the UK or the EU27, and hence the least likely. He suggests […]

Brexit’s institutional irony: how the EU has successfully outflanked the UK

The EU has been popularly derided as ineffectual, but it has shown remarkable co-ordination and unity in its Brexit negotiations with the UK. Dermot Hodson (Birkbeck College) and John Peterson (University of Edinburgh) explain how Michel Barnier has outflanked the UK, with both the Commission and the Council presenting a united front.

Before British voters went to the polls in June 2016, the institutions […]

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    British influence in Brussels had been far greater than recognised

British influence in Brussels had been far greater than recognised

Britain had far greater influence in Brussels since 1973 than has been recognised. For decades the UK was a driving and liberalising force when it came to the Single Market, enlargement, competition and trade, as well as foreign policy. Jonathan Faull (Kings College London), Piers Ludlow (LSE), and Laurent Warlouzet (Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale) outline the story of this significant and widespread British sway over the […]