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What no-deal really means for customs on the Northern Irish border

We still have little idea what the customs arrangements on the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland will be after 29 March. A border control expert explains why the border is so crucial and sets out the scale of the task customs and other regulatory bodies on both sides of the border will face.

If the United Kingdom leaves the EU as scheduled, […]

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    “Failed State” Britannia: 5th century experiences highlight some of the risks of Brexit

“Failed State” Britannia: 5th century experiences highlight some of the risks of Brexit

What lessons for Brexit can be drawn from Britain AD410? In this blog, Nigel Culkin and Richard Simmons write about the broken supply chains and money troubles of the fifth century “Failed State” Britannia.

Imagine you are living in the prosperous Roman Town of Durnovaria (or Dorchester, as it’s known today) around the middle of the 4th Century. Life is probably quite good. We […]

January 22nd, 2019|Culture, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Breaking the Brexit deadlock: a binding Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement might provide the answer

Breaking the Brexit deadlock: a binding Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement might provide the answer

What if the solution for the UK Brexit shambles does lie with the EU? In this blog, Stijn Smismans (Cardiff University) proposes the tool of a Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement, instead of a Political Declaration, as a way to change the dynamics of cross-party compromise on a new deal.

Arguably the UK government has only itself to blame for the political and constitutional Brexit […]

No, after you… why sequencing matters in a majoritarian numbers game

The Commons is not just split over Brexit, but split four ways – hard Brexiteers, the ‘Goldilocks’ faction, supporters of a soft Brexit and Remainers. In order to make any progress, writes Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE), at least two of the groupings must agree on something. This makes the sequencing of votes extremely important – and that is something in […]

The implications of no-deal Brexit: is the EU prepared?

This policy contribution, based on a note written for the Bundestag EU Committee and written by Guntram B Wolff (Bruegel), explores the possible consequences of a no-deal Brexit for the European Union and assesses preparations on the EU side. It also provides guidance on the optimal strategy for the EU, depending on the choices made by the United Kingdom.
Overall, a […]

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    New tricks for an old hand: getting Brexit through Parliament

New tricks for an old hand: getting Brexit through Parliament

In this blog, Benjamin Martill and Leo von Bülow-Quirk argue there’s still a way to reach agreement on a Brexit deal—but it’ll require Parliament to work in a whole new way.

Here we go again. Yesterday the ‘mother of all parliaments’ inflicted the mother of all defeats on the government, rejecting Theresa May’s painstakingly negotiated withdrawal agreement by a huge majority […]

Backwards, march! Brexit, CANZUK and the legacy of empire

Talk of ‘Global Britain’ has revived CANZUK – a proposed alliance of Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK, sharing some of the principles of the EU. Duncan Bell (University of Cambridge, left) and Srdjan Vucetic (University of Ottawa) discuss the history of the idea and argue that it is impossible to isolate it from its colonial origins.

It was coined in […]

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    What are the Irish government’s Brexit priorities? A united Ireland is not one of them

What are the Irish government’s Brexit priorities? A united Ireland is not one of them

What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

Following the UK vote in favour of Leave, the Irish government moved swiftly to […]

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    Long read: What remains of Remain and what’s left of Leave?

Long read: What remains of Remain and what’s left of Leave?

In the past few weeks, parliamentary Brexit procedures have moved into a state of high anxiety. In this blog, Graham Harrison (University of Sheffield) asks what remains of Remain and what’s left of Leave. He doubts that there will be a second referendum. But if there is, one should assess not only the politics of leaving but also the politics […]

January 16th, 2019|Culture, Featured|8 Comments|

Believing in a just world helped some Remain voters deal with Brexit

Counterfactual thinking is one of the ways people respond to unwelcome news. Fuschia Sirois (University of Sheffield) describes the coping mechanisms by which Remain voters sought to deal with the referendum result. ‘If only’ thinking – for example, at the thought of a second vote – tended to make them more unhappy, while focussing on the fact that there was […]