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Losing an ally in the EU: the view on Brexit from Finland

Eurosceptic support in Finland – previously at 43% – has fallen away since the EU referendum last June, writes Juha Jokela. The country is now keen to strengthen the Union’s defence capability, though it is sceptical of some of the proposed eurozone reforms. Finns are conscious they are about to lose an ally when Britain leaves the EU, and […]

Cracks are beginning to appear in British-Irish relations

Since the Brexit referendum, policy-makers’ and academics’ attention has increasingly focused on the impact of Brexit on the border in Ireland, specifically on the impact of a ‘hard’ border. The border issue is obviously highly significant economically and politically and deserves attention. But, as argued by Etain Tannam from Trinity College Dublin, the fundamental importance of the British-Irish relationship is at least as […]

Can the Visegrad Four hold its line over Brexit – or will the splits show?

For the Visegrad Four (Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia), Brexit could be an opportunity to press for their own interests in Europe, not least because of the number of their citizens who are living in Britain. But the Group is far from united, their public statements about Brexit have been few and the current uproar over judicial […]

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    Unemployment, reliance on factory jobs and low income explain Brexit

Unemployment, reliance on factory jobs and low income explain Brexit

The Brexit vote represented a key moment for European integration. Sascha O. Becker, Thiemo Fetzer, and Dennis Novy examine it in great detail, using statistical analysis as a way to highlight which factors proved to be the strongest predictors of the ‘Vote leave’ share. Though their findings establish correlations, not causation, they nonetheless underscore the many complex issues that surfaced in the ‘Vote Leave’ result. 

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    No good choices for the British government in the Brexit negotiations

No good choices for the British government in the Brexit negotiations

David Davis has been criticised in some quarters for spending only two hours in Brussels this week negotiating with Michel Barnier before returning hurriedly to London. This criticism is misplaced, writes Brendan Donnelly. As Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, Davis needs to exercise the closest possible control on all the negotiations relating to Brexit. Most of […]

A democracy deficit plagues the US and the European Union

The European Union and the United States suffer from democracy deficits. Modern democracy is realised in regularly elected legislative bodies that, though small enough to house in a parliamentary building, are large enough to reflect the interests of an entire people. David V Johnson writes that by ratio of representatives to population, the US and the EU have among the least […]

Brexit means inward investment to the UK will fall

Supply chains cross borders many times before components go into a final product in any EU country, write David Bailey, Nigel Driffield and Michail Karoglou. When the UK leaves the Single Market, it will be a less attractive destination for firms wanting to coordinate their resources. The devaluation of sterling also lowers the expected returns from UK investment when translated […]

When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

All EU migrants are not equal when it comes to residency rights, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of […]

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    Desire for change and rejection of a ‘hard Brexit’ motivated young people in the General Election

Desire for change and rejection of a ‘hard Brexit’ motivated young people in the General Election

A new survey of voters in the recent UK general election has revealed that young voters – those between the ages of 18 and 24 years old – were significantly more motivated by a desire for change, a rejection of the vision of Brexit that the Government was promoting, and frustration with the current political climate than the rest […]

Euroscepticism has taken hold across the EU – but it has many different roots

Euroscepticism – defined as outright or defined opposition to the European project – is becoming a mainstream, contested phenomenon, writes Simona Guerra. The EU has been challenged by the Greek referendum in July 2015, the refugee crisis and Brexit. Euroscepticism is no longer the exclusive province of ‘peripheral’ parties like Ukip or the fringes of society. How did a previously sidelined […]