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    Seeking advice in the wake of Brexit: where can EU students get information regarding residency?

Seeking advice in the wake of Brexit: where can EU students get information regarding residency?

The issue of Comprehensive Sickness Insurance (CSI) and residency for EU students has become a focal point following the outcome of the Brexit referendum.  However, in the five years, I have been at LSE, I have advised on the requirements for CSI in relation to dual-EU/Non-EU nationals accessing their right of free movement.  Dual-EU/Non-EU students often do not have […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 1: What can we expect from Brexit negotiations?

In the first of LSE’s Continental Breakfasts – held under Chatham House rules, so participants can speak as freely as they wish – a roundtable discussed the immediate challenges facing the UK as it triggers Article 50. Robert van Geffen distills some of the key points.

Once Article 50 is triggered, the European Council will meet to issue guidelines […]

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    Brexit poses an existential threat to the political and Parliamentary system

Brexit poses an existential threat to the political and Parliamentary system

Recently Wolfgang Muenchau asserted that after the triggering of Article 50 it was now inevitable that the UK would leave the EU. Those who had voted “remain” in last year’s referendum should renounce their anger at and resentment of the present government’s negotiating tactics. They could more usefully devote their energies to reappraising the unsuccessful arguments they had put […]

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    Brexit should make it easier to address the Eurozone’s challenges

Brexit should make it easier to address the Eurozone’s challenges

Annette Bongardt and Francisco Torres recall that the Eurozone risked seeing its legitimate efforts to strengthen the EMU vetoed by the UK, a country with a derogation from the monetary union. They argue that had ‘Remain’ won, the prospects for completing and sustaining the EMU would have worsened and dissatisfaction with the EU would have increased. In their view, […]

Post-Brexit Britain should cotton on to an opportunity to transform global trade

Brexit should be viewed as an important opportunity for fresh thinking about trade and development policy, argue Richard Baldwin, Paul Collier and Richard Venables. EU economic and trade policies were far from perfect, and Britain has the chance to lead the way in devising a fairer set of policies that help development in Africa and the Caribbean, while helping […]

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    Brexit, competition and markets: there’s a need to spread the benefits of growth

Brexit, competition and markets: there’s a need to spread the benefits of growth

London and the South-East plus metropolitan and major university towns are markedly more pro-market and pro-competition than much of the rest of the UK. This is reflected in the geographical pattern of Brexit referendum results. In this post, Jon Stern examines the future of competition policies, as well as the perceptions of fairness and legitimacy of pro-market competition and industrial policies […]

Holding Brexiteers to account

The UK first dismissed the European Community, but later spent 12 years desperate to join it, writes Adrian Williamson. He argues that holding Brexiteers to account can be done by looking at economic history.

The House of Commons has voted overwhelmingly to trigger Article 50, on the explicit basis that this process will be irrevocable and that, at the end […]

April 20th, 2017|Culture, Featured|0 Comments|

Video: Brexit and Migration

Why is EU migration so controversial? Will EU citizens be able to stay in the UK post-Brexit? What controls on future EU migration are likely? In this LSE Lecture, Philippe Legrain and Patrick McGovern explain.

This post gives the views of its authors, not the position of LSE Brexit or the London School of Economics. 

Philippe Legrain, LSE European Institute

Patrick McGovern, LSE Sociology

‘The public mood could change’: Q&A with Roland Rudd, chair of Open Britain

Among the groups campaigning against a hard Brexit, Open Britain is among the best-resourced. But their impact on public opinion and the government’s negotiating stance has so far been minimal. LSE Brexit co-editor Ros Taylor asked the chair of Open Britain, Roland Rudd, about the campaign’s strategy.

It’s March 2019 and we’ve just crashed out of the EU without a trade or transitional deal. […]

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    LSE Growth Commission: despite Brexit, the UK should stay open to international talent

LSE Growth Commission: despite Brexit, the UK should stay open to international talent

As a Research Economist at LSE’s Growth Commission, Anna Valero spent part of the post-Brexit months studying the gaps between public policy and the new economic reality in the UK.  In an interview with LSE Business Review’s managing editor, Helena Vieira, she discusses what the UK could do stimulate economic growth and fight inequality. The skills gap is one of her key points, […]