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Who will pick fruit and harvest vegetables after Brexit? Reviving SAWS could be a solution

British agriculture relies heavily on seasonal migrant labour, and much of this comes from the EU. Where will farmers turn to find workers after Britain leaves the EU – particularly if, as one cabinet minister has suggested, they come under pressure to grow more food for the domestic market and thereby keep prices down? Wyn Grant (University of Warwick) looks […]

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    Ensuring free movement of data after Brexit is crucial, but looks unlikely at the moment

Ensuring free movement of data after Brexit is crucial, but looks unlikely at the moment

Data protection has been high on Parliament’s agenda, with the Data Protection Bill, intended to bring UK law in line with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation making its way through both Houses, and the House of Commons holding a debate on “Exiting the European Union and Data Protection”. The government has produced a “Future Partnership Paper” on the exchange […]

November 17th, 2017|Featured|0 Comments|
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    There are few good solutions from a divided Cyprus for Northern Ireland

There are few good solutions from a divided Cyprus for Northern Ireland

The Good Friday agreement put to rest age-old conflicts in Ireland. It also offered hope that the reunification of Cyprus might be possible within the European Union. But lately, as Stavros Zenios writes, the “Green Line” that divides the easternmost island of the EU is viewed as a template for a soft border at the westernmost island of the Union after […]

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    What makes Britain ‘Great’? The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism

What makes Britain ‘Great’? The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism

The Leave and Remain campaigns defined British ‘greatness’ in very different ways. The referendum reflects more than attitudes toward EU membership — it  marks a new understanding of Britain’s role in the world, argues Benjamin Martill (LSE). The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism has important implications and needs to be taken seriously.

The ‘Great’ in Great Britain is a geographical […]

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    Why Britain (usually) obeys the European Court of Human Rights

Why Britain (usually) obeys the European Court of Human Rights

Despite often complaining about the existence of the European Court of Human Rights, the UK has one of the strongest compliance records in the Court’s 47-country system. Zoë Jay explains how the UK’s conceptions of human rights protection shape its willingness to comply with the Court’s rulings.

To say the United Kingdom hasn’t always seen eye to eye with the […]

Article 50 does allow Britain to negotiate a transitional period

The PM intends to negotiate a transitional period after March 2019, during which people, businesses and services would have time to adapt to Brexit while the current regulatory framework is maintained. But it is still unclear how Britain will do this. Federico Ortino and Holger Hestermeyer (King’s College London) argue that Article 50 allows the UK to postpone the beginning of the withdrawal […]

What motivated Conservative MPs to back or oppose Brexit?

The Conservative Party’s divisions over the EU are well known. But what motivated MPs to back Leave or Remain? Luke Moore uses logistic regression analysis to consider three key motivations: seeking office, votes, or that particular policy. He explains why all three affected Conservative MPs’ decision making, but that policy- or office-seeking were more prominent.

The divisions amongst Conservative MPs […]

November 14th, 2017|Featured, UK politics|0 Comments|

Social capital and belonging: the ‘citizens of somewhere’ are more likely to be pro-EU

A notional divide between ‘anywheres’, ‘nowheres’ and ‘somewheres’ has emerged since the EU referendum. Paula Surridge, Siobhan McAndrew and Neema Begum (University of Bristol) explored attitudes towards the EU in the context of social identities, social capital and neighbourhood belonging. Counterintuitively, they  found that people with a stronger attachment to their locality tended to be more pro-EU.

Imagined communities based […]

November 13th, 2017|Culture, Featured|0 Comments|

Will Christmas come early in the Brexit negotiations?

Michel Barnier has indicated that the UK has two weeks left to make concessions if the Brexit negotiations are to advance to the next stage at the December European Council meeting. Simon Usherwood writes that the next fortnight is set to be critical in determining whether the UK and EU are ready to make progress in settling their evolving relationship.

Christmas comes sooner that you think […]

November 13th, 2017|Featured|1 Comment|

Why are the white working classes still being held responsible for Brexit and Trump?

Why do we persist in holding the ‘white working class’ accountable for Brexit and Donald Trump’s win, when the evidence suggests it was the backing of the white middle classes that secured them? Gurminder K Bhambra (University of Sussex) argues that a pervasive ‘methodological whiteness’ has distorted social scientific accounts of both these elections. It has enabled commentators to offer economic disadvantage as an […]

November 10th, 2017|Culture, Featured|7 Comments|