Featured

LSE Continental Breakfast 10: Brexit and multilateralism

Multilateral institutions – from the EU to NATO to the G-summits – are under strain. How does Brexit fit into this trend? Horatio Mortimer (LSE) reports on an expert discussion held at the LSE under Chatham House rules in June 2018.
Brexit, Germany and the multilateral system
Brexit is bad news for the EU, and perhaps especially for Germany, the EU’s largest and […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Integrity instead of deceit: how to improve the delivery and content of political campaigns

Integrity instead of deceit: how to improve the delivery and content of political campaigns

We do not know how the electorate has been influenced by new political campaigning techniques. However, the central issue is not how we are influenced but that political campaigns are characterised by attempts to manipulate the electorate to increase votes and profits. Bethany Shiner (Middlesex University) argues that focusing on whether, how or why the electorate is influenced distracts from […]

July 18th, 2018|Culture, Featured|0 Comments|

Soft Rock: the power shifts in Madrid and London could help Gibraltar

Gibraltar’s border with Spain, and its economic dependence on financial services, mean it has a lot to lose from a hard Brexit. Chris Grocott (University of Leicester) looks at the implications of a new Spanish government and the departures of Boris Johnson and David Davis.

June’s change in the Spanish government has been welcomed in Gibraltar. The hard-line Partido Popular has been replaced by a coalition […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Cabinet resignations and the Chequers proposal could destabilise the economy

Cabinet resignations and the Chequers proposal could destabilise the economy

The stability of UK economy is at a critical stage – now that Theresa May’s leadership may be challenged following high-profile Cabinet resignations, and depending on how the EU reacts to the ‘soft’ Brexit approach agreed at Chequers. Michael Ellington and Costas Milas (University of Liverpool) explain how the pound’s exchange rate and volatility go hand in hand with […]

The Brexit dividend: expect a lost decade of economic underperformance and political crisis

Contrary to some predictions, Britain’s economy has not crashed in the two years since the EU referendum. But growth has slowed markedly, productivity is down and investment is on hold. Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE) looks at the effect the prolonged uncertainty about future trade arrangements is having on the economy.

In September 2016, a few months after the UK referendum vote to leave […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Two years after the vote, there is little certainty where the UK-EU relationship is heading

Two years after the vote, there is little certainty where the UK-EU relationship is heading

Two years after the vote, there is little certainty regarding the UK’s political and economic future. Brexiters themselves are split between wanting a Singapore-on-Thames or a Belarus-on-Trent. Simon Hix (LSE) assesses where the UK-EU relationship is heading. He argues that despite persisting uncertainty, a No Deal is the least-preferred option of both the UK or the EU27, and hence the least likely. He suggests […]

  • Permalink Migration by Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0Gallery

    Has the government been overestimating net non-EU immigration?

Has the government been overestimating net non-EU immigration?

Could next Monday present another moment of embarrassment for the government on immigration? As figures are finally due out on net migration – delayed from May – the signs are somewhat ominous, writes Marely Morris (IPPR). He argues that it’s looking increasingly possible that the government’s central estimate of migration – based on its longstanding International Passenger Survey – […]

Brexit’s institutional irony: how the EU has successfully outflanked the UK

The EU has been popularly derided as ineffectual, but it has shown remarkable co-ordination and unity in its Brexit negotiations with the UK. Dermot Hodson (Birkbeck College) and John Peterson (University of Edinburgh) explain how Michel Barnier has outflanked the UK, with both the Commission and the Council presenting a united front.

Before British voters went to the polls in June 2016, the institutions […]

English football in a post-Brexit world: Kane we do it?

As English football fans took to the streets to celebrate the national team’s victories in the World Cup and then mourned losing to Croatia, it’s worth reflecting on the state of English football in a post-Brexit world. For some, the prospects are good if the flood of foreign-born players dries up and local teams are again made up of […]

July 13th, 2018|Culture, Featured|1 Comment|
  • trump
    Permalink Photo: <a href=White House. Public domain" />Gallery

    Might economists be partly to blame for Trump and the prospect of a hard Brexit?

Might economists be partly to blame for Trump and the prospect of a hard Brexit?

The reasons for the Trump phenomenon and Brexit vote are many and various. But have we overlooked ways in which standard economics, by failing to take seriously the radical uncertainty endemic in modern political economies, has contributed to the populist turn? Richard Bronk (LSE) argues that by mischaracterising their profession as able to make precise forecasts of uncertain futures – an […]