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    The Brexit vote and Trump’s election were decided democratically. So why don’t they feel that way?

The Brexit vote and Trump’s election were decided democratically. So why don’t they feel that way?

The Brexit referendum and Trump’s election were each decided by a free and fair vote, yet large proportions of UK and US citizens have trouble accepting them as truly “democratic.” A working democracy requires more than free elections; it requires additional institutions, such as well-functioning political public sphere and a responsive political party system, to channel citizens’ voices into […]

November 6th, 2018|Culture, Featured|1 Comment|

Learning from Salisbury: UK sanctions policy after Brexit

Uncertainty surrounds most aspects of the Brexit negotiations, but in the sphere of sanctions there is a legal framework that provides guidance on what happens after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. However, writes Anna Nadibaidze (Open Europe), the UK may choose to go its own way on occasion – particularly after situations like the Salisbury poisonings. 

The UK will remain part […]

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    London Calling Brexit: it’s not about Britain and Europe, it’s about Barnet High Street and All Saints’ School

London Calling Brexit: it’s not about Britain and Europe, it’s about Barnet High Street and All Saints’ School

The London Borough of Barnet is one of the five local authority areas selected for the LSE project ‘Understanding Brexit impacts at a local level’. These reports contextualise the Brexit impact studies carried out at a national level with qualitative evidence collected at the local level. In this blog, another in our London Calling Brexit series, Alexandra Bulat (SSEES, University of London) recounts […]

Brexit has already hurt EU and non-EU exports by up to 13% – new research

Over the past few months, Terence Huw Edwards (Loughborough University, left), Christian Soegaard (Warwick University) and Mustapha Douch (Aston University) have been investigating how the vote of June 23 2016 has since affected the values and patterns of Britain’s trade with major trading partners inside and outside the European Union. By comparing trade flows with a model of what […]

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    Why there should not be another snap general (Brexit) election

Why there should not be another snap general (Brexit) election

Having a general election in 2018 is an exceptionally bad way of solving the Brexit problem, argues Yossi Nehushtan. Not only is it anti-democratic to have an election about a single topic but the result will not reflect the majority will because the first past the post system never does.

The Prime Minister recently denied the option of a second […]

November 1st, 2018|Featured, UK politics|2 Comments|

Universities are a bargaining chip in the Brexit free-trade future

Higher education – although clearly not a government priority – is becoming a bargaining chip as the UK considers its future outside the EU. Anne Corbett (LSE) examines the May government’s proposal to treat higher education as a sweetener for free trade deals, an idea that is likely to have life in it whatever the immediate Brexit outcome.

Spare a thought […]

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    Curiosity, intelligence and spirit of adventure: challenging misconceptions about low-skilled EU migrants

Curiosity, intelligence and spirit of adventure: challenging misconceptions about low-skilled EU migrants

Curiosity, intelligence and spirit of adventure are the attributes of many low-skilled migrants to the United Kingdom. In this post, Simone Varriale challenges the misconceptions about EU migrants in the current debate. He presents two stories of Italian migrants that explain why dangerous assumptions about low-skilled migration should not feed into policy proposals, and why the government’s current post-Brexit immigration plans […]

October 31st, 2018|Featured, Migration|3 Comments|

Great Yarmouth: stories of frustration, hope and Brexit

Great Yarmouth voted to leave in 2016 by a majority of 71.5%. The following year Janosch Prinz (University of East Anglia) talked to some of its residents about their disillusionment with the local economy, a lost sense of pride in their community and country and a sense that EU bureaucracy was hampering the UK.

Great Yarmouth, sitting between the North […]

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    After Brexit, the UK should have a democratic right of return

After Brexit, the UK should have a democratic right of return

Many people believe that the UK’s decision to leave the EU spells trouble for both country and continent, yet by and large think that the exit vote and process, painful though they may be, adhere to the rules and spirit of democratic self-government. Peter Niesen and Markus Patberg argue that in one important respect this is not the case, since fully democratic credentials […]

‘Britzerland’: the problem of dispute resolution post-Brexit

Both the UK and Switzerland are trying to negotiate a dispute resolution mechanism that would give the European Court of Justice the final word on the interpretation of EU law. Carl Baudenbacher (Monckton Chambers and former president of the EFTA Court) looks at the inspiration for this arrangement – the EU-Ukraine Agreement – and explains why it is a […]