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How a second referendum could be the best way to overcome the Brexit impasse

A new vote based on the revocation (or not) of Article 50 would give the UK government a clear signal to proceed in one direction or another, and thus trim down the number of options being touted – most of which are unworkable as things stand, write Maria Dimertzis (Bruegel) and Nicola Viegi (University of Pretoria).
The harsh realities of Brexit […]

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    Climate change is a likely area of successful cooperation between the EU and the UK after Brexit

Climate change is a likely area of successful cooperation between the EU and the UK after Brexit

Alexandra-Maria Bocse (LSE) assesses the degree to which the EU’s participation in the global climate regime will be affected by Brexit. First, the EU will lose a member that has pushed for higher standards of climate protection at home and EU level. This might have a negative impact on the EU’s climate policies. Second, the EU will lose an innovative […]

Farming in Brexitland: weathering the incoming storm

With the prospect of losing timely and tariff-free access to the single market – as well as migrant labour – farmers face even more uncertainty than most as a result of Brexit. Richard Byrne (Harper Adams University) explains the changes that Brexit is bringing.

The last sheep sale before Christmas at Welshpool livestock market was seen by many as a […]

London Calling Brexit: European views of the UK capital

London symbolises the UK to many people across the rest of the EU. What then do they think Brexit means for London and how has London – the UK’s media centre – shaped their views? In this, the fifth in our London Calling Brexit series, Alexandra Borchardt, of the Reuters Institute at Oxford, looks at how to many in […]

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    From Euroscepticism to outright populism: the evolution of British tabloids

From Euroscepticism to outright populism: the evolution of British tabloids

For many years, Britain’s tabloid press has nurtured Euroscepticism. Franco Zappettini (University of Liverpool) argues that during and since the EU referendum, this discourse has become explicitly populist, pitting ‘the people’ against their perceived enemies. 

The role played by the British press – and in particular by the tabloids – in framing the debate both before and after the EU referendum […]

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    Thermostatic public opinion: why UK anti-immigrant sentiments rise and then fall

Thermostatic public opinion: why UK anti-immigrant sentiments rise and then fall

Contrary to popular narratives, there has been a collapse in anti-immigrant hostility in Britain, evident since the run-up to the 2016 referendum. Patrick English (University of Exeter) explains how the success of the BNP and UKIP may have caused this fall and argues that recent changes may be seen as confirming the ‘thermostatic’ character of British public opinion.

The Britain of […]

Brexit and belonging: what the concept of autochthony can tell us

What does it mean to ‘belong’ in the world of Brexit? Kathryn Cassidy (left) and Gill Davidson (Northumbria University) discuss how the concept of autochthony, or what it means to be indigenous or ‘native’, can illuminate the way we think about Brexit and belonging – and in particular the categories of ‘Brexiter’ and ‘Remainer’.

As our political scene descends into chaos over […]

January 3rd, 2019|Culture, Featured|0 Comments|
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    A citizens’ assembly is the best way out of the Brexit mess

A citizens’ assembly is the best way out of the Brexit mess

The ways out of the Brexit mess are now becoming clearer, writes Charles Turner (Warwick). Assuming that, in this parliamentary democracy, the non-choice between May’s deal and no deal can be avoided, there seem to be five alternatives. The best one, however, would be to organise a citizens’ assembly, he argues.

MPs can indeed pass Theresa May’s deal against their better […]

LSE Brexit in 2018: the editors’ pick

December 31st, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Production of immobility? What will settled status do well, what it will do badly and whom it will fail

Production of immobility? What will settled status do well, what it will do badly and whom it will fail

Less than one hundred days away from exiting the European Union, European citizens living in the UK stand to lose many rights associated with freedom of movement. We are witnessing the ‘hostile environment’ creeping into the new settlement scheme process. Despite reassurances that the settlement scheme is more flexible than the permanent residence one, and the rhetoric that […]

December 27th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|1 Comment|