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Brexit’s institutional irony: how the EU has successfully outflanked the UK

The EU has been popularly derided as ineffectual, but it has shown remarkable co-ordination and unity in its Brexit negotiations with the UK. Dermot Hodson (Birkbeck College) and John Peterson (University of Edinburgh) explain how Michel Barnier has outflanked the UK, with both the Commission and the Council presenting a united front.

Before British voters went to the polls in June 2016, the institutions […]

English football in a post-Brexit world: Kane we do it?

As English football fans took to the streets to celebrate the national team’s victories in the World Cup and then mourned losing to Croatia, it’s worth reflecting on the state of English football in a post-Brexit world. For some, the prospects are good if the flood of foreign-born players dries up and local teams are again made up of […]

July 13th, 2018|Culture, Featured|1 Comment|
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    Might economists be partly to blame for Trump and the prospect of a hard Brexit?

Might economists be partly to blame for Trump and the prospect of a hard Brexit?

The reasons for the Trump phenomenon and Brexit vote are many and various. But have we overlooked ways in which standard economics, by failing to take seriously the radical uncertainty endemic in modern political economies, has contributed to the populist turn? Richard Bronk (LSE) argues that by mischaracterising their profession as able to make precise forecasts of uncertain futures – an […]

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    The devil is in the detail: multinationals favour the customs union

The devil is in the detail: multinationals favour the customs union

In a customs union, goods cross borders seamlessly, but in a free trade agreement, border checks are needed to ensure conformity with rules of origin. Paola Conconi (ULB/LSE) explains why a customs union is key for multinationals to stay in the UK after Brexit.

Some members of Theresa May’s cabinet are pushing for a ‘soft’ Brexit, which would allow the UK to remain close […]

EU law is not a thing we simply leave behind on Brexit day

The former DExEU minister Steve Baker celebrated the new web archive of EU law to be maintained by the National Archives as Britain becomes a ‘self-governing nation again’. Joelle Grogan (Middlesex University) writes that EU law will continue to play a role in legal decisions, and the changes the government intends to make will not all receive parliamentary scrutiny.
Anyone interested […]

Chequers produces the best and most elaborate fudge available

Does the text the cabinet agreed at Chequers amount to a soft Brexit or a soft-ish Brexit? Neither, says Jim Gallagher (Centre on Constitutional Change): it is yet another fudge that defers a decision on the final shape of the deal into the transitional period, and beyond.

 

“What I tell you three times is true”
Lewis Carroll

After a long day at Chequers, Theresa May’s […]

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    British influence in Brussels had been far greater than recognised

British influence in Brussels had been far greater than recognised

Britain had far greater influence in Brussels since 1973 than has been recognised. For decades the UK was a driving and liberalising force when it came to the Single Market, enlargement, competition and trade, as well as foreign policy. Jonathan Faull (Kings College London), Piers Ludlow (LSE), and Laurent Warlouzet (Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale) outline the story of this significant and widespread British sway over the […]

Rule-takers and rule-makers: why TBTs are so crucial to Brexit

At the heart of the wrangling over Brexit is the question of how much regulatory autonomy the UK is prepared to concede in exchange for access to the Single Market. It is these technical barriers to trade (TBTs) that inhibit countries from exporting to each other. Hayden Goudy and Elisa Kempe (LSE) set out what the UK can realistically hope for and predict […]

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    Book Review: Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility

Book Review: Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility

In Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility, Jo Littler offers a rich analysis that intricately teases out the grasp ‘merit’ and ‘meritocracy’ have on everyday cultural and social narratives of value and power in contemporary society. This is a rewarding contribution to the shared work of challenging hegemonic, neoliberal myths that uphold the status quo, recommends Sarah Burton, and to the building of […]

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    The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

To explain why trading European markets for Chinese is not a simple switch, Jeremy Green (University of Cambridge) examines the City of London Corporation’s role within economic policy-making, as well as the embrace of Chinese finance under the Coalition government.

These are extraordinarily turbulent times for the City of London. Over the past decade, it has faced two major challenges. From […]