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Expect a backlash if the £50bn offer doesn’t move negotiations on

After threatening to pay nothing to the EU, then conceding £20bn, the government has finally indicated it will pay a Brexit ‘divorce bill’ of £40-50bn. The initial reaction from Eurosceptics has been rather muted, writes Iain Begg (LSE). But if the European Council does not allow exit negotiations to move to the next stage, we can expect a serious backlash […]

Post-Brexit UK trade policy remains a wish list

About half of UK’s trade and investment is with the EU and, as a member of the single market, the UK implements similar standards for products and services as the EU. Furthermore, as a member of the customs union, the UK operates a common external tariff, and goods and services can move seamlessly with no customs or compliance checks. How […]

How Parliament’s campaign of attrition forced the government to open up about Brexit

The real battle over Brexit has not been about whether Parliament will get a final vote, writes Ben Worthy (Birkbeck University of London). The true fight is about information – about what kind of Brexit the government wants, and what its impact is likely to be. In this, Parliament has been rather successful. Pressure from select committees and Labour’s deployment of an arcane […]

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    The productivity gap adds to the concerns about how Brexit can be navigated

The productivity gap adds to the concerns about how Brexit can be navigated

In this blog, Iain Begg (LSE) explains why the low expectations of the trend of productivity growth in the UK, published by the Office for Budget Responsibility, add to the concerns about how Brexit can be navigated.

Chancellors usually try to achieve three things in their annual budget speeches: setting a course for the economy; pulling rabbits from their hats […]

Book review: How To Stop Brexit (and Make Britain Great Again) – Nick Clegg

In How to Stop Brexit (and Make Britain Great Again), Nick Clegg offers a short, accessible book seeking to persuade the ambivalent or undecided that Brexit should be stopped; to suggest what the average voter can do about it; and to propose an alternative model for relations between Britain and Europe. While this is an engaging and lively read with a number of […]

November 28th, 2017|Featured, UK politics|3 Comments|
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    This Brexit juncture is a critical moment for the Good Friday Agreement

This Brexit juncture is a critical moment for the Good Friday Agreement

In this blog, Katy Hayward and David Phinnemore (Queen’s University Belfast) highlight their current report on Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement, which they presented today at the European Parliament. They argue that thanks to Brexit the political trajectories of the UK and Ireland will increasingly diverge and that the current negotiation juncture, in particular, is a critical moment for the Good […]

Brexit, the four freedoms and the indivisibility dogma

The EU’s position in the Brexit negotiations is based on the premise that the four freedoms of the single market – goods, capital, services, and labour – are indivisible. Wilhelm Kohler and Gernot Müller (University of Tübingen) argue that this indivisibility claim has no economic foundations, and that negotiating on this premise risks unnecessary harm. Reintroducing trade barriers will inflict damage on both […]

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    Britain cannot and should not imitate the Swiss model of sectoral bilateralism with the EU

Britain cannot and should not imitate the Swiss model of sectoral bilateralism with the EU

In this blog post, Joachim Blatter (University of Lucerne) explains why Britain cannot and should not imitate the Swiss model of sectoral bilateralism. He also outlines where the British and the Swiss could join forces for re-inventing transnational governance and democracy in Europe after Brexit.

Britain cannot imitate the Swiss model of sectoral bilateralism

In Switzerland, direct forms of democracy are firmly […]

Brexit has blown open the unreconciled divisions in Northern Ireland

The British and Irish governments have long tried to keep a lid on the tensions in Northern Ireland. But Brexit, argues Duncan Morrow (Ulster University) has exposed the weaknesses of the Good Friday and St Andrew’s Agreements – deals that never required each side to give up their aims of ruling Northern Ireland alone. Now these unreconciled political narratives […]

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    Germany’s Brexit moment: What happens now following the collapse of coalition talks?

Germany’s Brexit moment: What happens now following the collapse of coalition talks?

Coalition talks in Germany between the CDU/CSU, the FDP and the Greens have collapsed, with the FDP withdrawing from the discussions after four weeks of negotiations. Julian Göpffarth assesses why the FDP chose to quit the process and what is likely to happen now.

This morning, Berlin woke up in shock. Most observers anticipated that the so-called Jamaica coalition negotiations […]