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LSE Brexit in 2018: the editors’ pick

December 31st, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Production of immobility? What will settled status do well, what it will do badly and whom it will fail

Production of immobility? What will settled status do well, what it will do badly and whom it will fail

Less than one hundred days away from exiting the European Union, European citizens living in the UK stand to lose many rights associated with freedom of movement. We are witnessing the ‘hostile environment’ creeping into the new settlement scheme process. Despite reassurances that the settlement scheme is more flexible than the permanent residence one, and the rhetoric that […]

December 27th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|1 Comment|

LSE Brexit’s 2018 holiday reading list

December 24th, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|1 Comment|

The time has come to revoke Article 50

It’s time to revoke Article 50, writes Phil Syrpis (University of Bristol). Westminster has yet to see it, but it will not be long before the reality becomes impossible to avoid. Unless something is agreed, the UK will leave the EU on 29 March with no deal.

While attention was focused on the travails of Theresa May – who on 12 […]

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    There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

The contribution of traditional social democracy to the consolidation of neoliberalism in Europe illustrates the difficulties of developing a nationalist left alternative in the contemporary capitalist state, argues Lea Ypi. Contemporary socialism requires new ways of organising and must be transnational. Using the British case, she explains why neither Remain nor Leave fully capture the demands of the left.

The […]

The legal issues of revoking the notification to leave the EU – but then notifying to leave again

The European Court of Justice has ruled that the UK can unilaterally revoke Article 50. But, warns Ronan McCrea (UCL), this is only helpful if Britain takes the (extraordinarily unlikely) decision to reverse Brexit within the next couple of months. Should the UK equivocate, the Court would find itself in the very difficult position of having to rule on the country’s […]

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    The Brexit mess shows how the UK’s referendum process could learn from California’s ballot initiatives

The Brexit mess shows how the UK’s referendum process could learn from California’s ballot initiatives

Last weeks have seen the UK Parliament knee-deep in Brexit related debates, all of which stem from 2016’s non-binding referendum. Erik P. Bucy writes the current rancour in the UK over Brexit is reminiscent of California’s difficult experience with its anti-immigration Proposition 187, which had been strategically pushed by a Republican Governor in 1994. He argues that the UK may have […]

December 20th, 2018|#LSEThinks, Featured|0 Comments|
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    What party competition in England will look like after European Parliament elections end

What party competition in England will look like after European Parliament elections end

European Parliament elections may not have been popular, but they used proportional representation – something which England’s national elections lack. Heinz Brandenburg (University of Strathclyde) looks at what this means for smaller parties, which have a hard time making headway under the first-past-the-post system.
One of the few certainties about Brexit is that the UK will cease to participate in European Parliament […]

December 19th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|1 Comment|

Europe Beyond Brexit: what’s next?

While the scheduled date of Brexit is fast approaching, the British public debate, which is focused on the current state of the exit negotiations and the outlooks for the future relationship, mainly represents the UK’s point of view. This is why the LSE European Institute and the LSE School of Public Policy jointly hosted a panel event aimed at […]

  • Permalink Manchester, 2014. Photo: >a href=https://www.flickr.com/photos/saw_that/14704275219/in/photolist-8unQCW-WV4fgx-XSQcoP-aGpBH-gM1ibZ-f7EiWB-Tj56WE-GDX7LW-TAoodx-opnfJx-Uchoco-W5ooJ8-XaGyfy-6cw2dZ-6neky1-dCxV3R-29XUTND-piBLcZ-9kmvLS-eCC4k1-rZxx6d-reoCjZ-2XzRnL-edaqFn-W5UXuy-cZBTcJ-ejmb9H-Lb9XSU-q4g5RG-Q99jc-dYk1nq-dWHQBr-nFDpje-rF9VPp-djvVKo-5p1BNa-6naaGx-ndML1J-6aqeiQ-nV4w2X-oSMWch-qk4RYM-87V8xM-USDcrw-gVvdJz-qm4Sfb-evJWkV-dGouPc-fPdd31-jRjG2Gallery

    The parochial altruist: why voters are sceptical about immigration

The parochial altruist: why voters are sceptical about immigration

Why are many – even unprejudiced – people sceptical about immigration? Alexander Kustov (Princeton University) shows this scepticism is largely because they think freer immigration will damage their own country. Despite their ethnic biases and other concerns, most voters can support increased immigration if they see that these policies benefit their compatriots in a clear and straightforward way.
Why do unprejudiced voters oppose immigration, […]

December 18th, 2018|Featured, Migration|6 Comments|