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Great Yarmouth: stories of frustration, hope and Brexit

Great Yarmouth voted to leave in 2016 by a majority of 71.5%. The following year Janosch Prinz (University of East Anglia) talked to some of its residents about their disillusionment with the local economy, a lost sense of pride in their community and country and a sense that EU bureaucracy was hampering the UK.

Great Yarmouth, sitting between the North […]

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    After Brexit, the UK should have a democratic right of return

After Brexit, the UK should have a democratic right of return

Many people believe that the UK’s decision to leave the EU spells trouble for both country and continent, yet by and large think that the exit vote and process, painful though they may be, adhere to the rules and spirit of democratic self-government. Peter Niesen and Markus Patberg argue that in one important respect this is not the case, since fully democratic credentials […]

‘Britzerland’: the problem of dispute resolution post-Brexit

Both the UK and Switzerland are trying to negotiate a dispute resolution mechanism that would give the European Court of Justice the final word on the interpretation of EU law. Carl Baudenbacher (Monckton Chambers and former president of the EFTA Court) looks at the inspiration for this arrangement – the EU-Ukraine Agreement – and explains why it is a […]

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    London Calling Brexit: The City of London and the ‘baptist-bootlegger’ coalition

London Calling Brexit: The City of London and the ‘baptist-bootlegger’ coalition

Think of London and Brexit and most will think of what it means for ‘the City’, the heart of the UK’s financial services industry. In this, the second in our London Calling Brexit series, Scott James (King’s College London) and Lucia Quaglia (University of Bologna) examine why London’s financial institutions have failed to wield the influence over Brexit that […]

Seven rules for getting Brexit-talk right

Despite protestations to the contrary, it’s clear that the process of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU has not been going to plan. It’s time we discussed ‘How (not) to talk about Brexit.’ Tim Oliver (University of Loughborough) suggests seven rules.

Britain’s vote to leave the EU has led to a flood of books, articles, blog posts, and more than enough […]

October 26th, 2018|Culture, Featured|8 Comments|

Continental Breakfast 12: Where is Brexit heading to?

The UK wants to remain economically in the UK, but leave it politically. Horatio Mortimer (LSE) reports on a breakfast event held at the LSE to discuss where Brexit is likely to end up. The likely outcome, the participants concluded, will be a ‘Brino’ – Brexit in name only – that satisfies no one.

In simplified terms, at the moment […]

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    Puffer Fish and Bargaining Chips: Why hard bargaining harms British interests

Puffer Fish and Bargaining Chips: Why hard bargaining harms British interests

When it comes to Brexit, there’s no doubt that UK negotiators have adopted a hard bargaining strategy. Benjamin Martill asks whether this is the best strategy for advancing British interests.

The New Politics of Bargaining

All eyes in British politics are on the negotiations between the UK and the EU over the terms of the forthcoming British withdrawal from the Union, […]

Leave-voting men, Brexit and the ‘crisis of masculinity’

Brexit may have been driven by those ‘left behind’ by globalisation, automation, the evolution of manufacturing, and the increased inequality of both income and wealth. Some have suggested that this feeling of being ‘left behind’ is exacerbated for working-class white men, in declining industrial and disadvantaged areas in particular. Julie MacLeavy (University of Bristol) draws on research with Leave voters in […]

October 24th, 2018|Culture, Featured|7 Comments|
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    Book Review: Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world by Adam Tooze (Part 2)

Book Review: Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world by Adam Tooze (Part 2)

In Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world, author Adam Tooze proposes a remarkably consistent narrative of the 2008 financial crisis and its political, geopolitical consequences — one that attempts a coherent interpretation of the global and European crises. In part two of his review of this seminal work, Shahin Vallée examines Tooze’s take on the crisis of transatlantic finance and the existential crisis for Europe […]

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    Remainer or Leaver? The emergence of the Brexit identity prism

Remainer or Leaver? The emergence of the Brexit identity prism

Britons used to identify as supporters of a political party. Now they are more likely to identify themselves as a ‘Remainer’ or a ‘Leaver’. Ian Montagu (ScotCen) looks at the challenges this new political divide presents as Britain prepares to leave the EU.

The past half-century has seen a more or less continuous decline in the number of voters who […]