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    Will the independence of the Bank of England fall as a consequence of Brexit?

Will the independence of the Bank of England fall as a consequence of Brexit?

Will central bank independence in the UK fall as a consequence of Brexit? As Hjalte Lokdam (LSE) explains, Brexit represents a political shift that is likely to affect the structure of the British governmental apparatus. The role of the executive will undoubtedly be strengthened, and if the already considerable difficulties associated with exiting the EU are compounded by a recession, an either […]

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    The future of the Single Electricity Market on the island of Ireland after Brexit is yet to be agreed on

The future of the Single Electricity Market on the island of Ireland after Brexit is yet to be agreed on

A great deal of attention during the Brexit negotiations has been focused on the issue of the Irish border. However, as Meabh Cormacain writes, Brexit also has important implications for Northern Ireland’s participation in the Single Electricity Market that currently exists across the island of Ireland. She highlights that despite widespread agreement on the importance of the Single Electricity […]

Article 50 is flawed: could the ECJ extend the two-year withdrawal period?

The two-year time limit stipulated in Article 50, argues Philip Allott (University of Cambridge), is wildly unrealistic: its drafters never anticipated that a large member state would ever leave the EU. In this legal opinion, he sets out how the ECJ could extend the withdrawal period, thereby allowing the UK to leave in an orderly fashion.
The UK’s scheduled withdrawal from […]

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    Brexit identities play a role in how people view the economy and immigration

Brexit identities play a role in how people view the economy and immigration

There is a divide between how Remainers and Leavers perceive the UK’s economic performance and other policy developments, explain Miriam Sorace and Sara B. Hobolt. A major consequence of this lack of agreement about basic facts is that reaching a consensus on how to navigate Brexit becomes even more complicated.

On the 23 June 2016, UK citizens voted to leave […]

September 6th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|4 Comments|
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    Had austerity not happened, Leave support could have been up to 10% lower

Had austerity not happened, Leave support could have been up to 10% lower

A series of cuts since the Coalition government curtailed the welfare state, activating this way a range of existing economic grievances. As a result, in districts that received the average austerity shock UKIP vote shares were up, compared to districts with little exposure to austerity. Thiemo Fetzer writes that the tight link between UKIP vote shares and an area’s […]

How long would it take to hold a second referendum on Brexit?

With exit day less than seven months away, one of the perceived obstacles to a second Brexit referendum is time. Jess Sargeant, Alan Renwick and Meg Russell (UCL Constitution Unit) discuss the constraints, concluding a new referendum could be held much more quickly than previous polls but a delay to exit day would most likely still be needed.

In order for a referendum to be held […]

September 5th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|4 Comments|

Continental Breakfast 11: fragile politics and trading relationships

Business Europe hosted a panel of LSE experts for a joint seminar with business representatives in Brussels on 25 June 2018 to discuss the current state of Brexit negotiations. Professors Kevin Featherstone and Tony Travers talked about the political situation in the UK, and Professor Paola Conconi and Jan Kleinheisterkamp went on to discuss potential new UK-EU trade relationships. Elsa Leromain (CEP, LSE) […]

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    Cultural backlash: the generational gap over Brexit is driven by authoritarian and populist values

Cultural backlash: the generational gap over Brexit is driven by authoritarian and populist values

Pippa Norris explains how generation gaps divide the electorate and mainstream parties. She writes that, while the EU referendum is a prime example of how these divisions play out in the UK, the changing nature of electoral cleavages raises important questions about politics and party competition in Western democracies more generally.

The Brexit decision shocked Britain’s image of itself, and […]

September 4th, 2018|Culture, Featured|1 Comment|
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    Permalink Jaywick. Photo: Alexandra BulatGallery

    Outside the “London bubble”: listening to views on Brexit and migration in Jaywick

Outside the “London bubble”: listening to views on Brexit and migration in Jaywick

Jaywick is a Leave-supporting village in Essex, and one of the most deprived areas of the UK. Alexandra Bulat (SSEES, University of London) talked to some of the people living there about migration and Brexit.

“We voted Leave, right? Then there is nothing else to say about Brexit!”

“What do you mean by Brexit? Can you explain in layman’s language?”

“I don’t think […]

September 3rd, 2018|Culture, Featured, Migration|6 Comments|
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    The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: how nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

The restoration of a ‘lost’ Britain: how nostalgia becomes a dangerous political force

For many Britons, everything was better in the past. Sophia Gaston writes that this is partly because governments have not always been successful at guiding citizens through times of social and economic change. She examines nostalgia as a political force in Britain and explains why politicians must address, rather than avoid questions about patriotism and identity.

The study of nostalgia […]

September 3rd, 2018|Culture, Featured|1 Comment|