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    China is a crucial partner for Britain to prosper outside the EU

China is a crucial partner for Britain to prosper outside the EU

British Prime Minister Theresa May’s upcoming visit to Beijing is part of London’s efforts to build “Global Britain” by forging new trade partnerships beyond the EU. Yu Jie (LSE) says both sides have good reasons to want closer engagement in trade and investment, even though they remain poles apart politically. The Prime Minister should grasp the opportunities on her visit […]

Why some eastern Europeans are driven to sleep rough

Until the end of 2017, the Home Office was deporting homeless eastern Europeans. Barbara Dorodowicz (East European Resource Centre) explains why the precarious nature of the job market – made worse by the uncertainties about Brexit – has forced some eastern Europeans to sleep rough. Employers have exploited the uncertainty to cut pay and pit migrants against each other.

Quietly, in November 2015, […]

January 25th, 2018|Featured, Migration|1 Comment|
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    It’s not what the rules are, it’s the way that you show it: proving ‘origin’ post-Brexit

It’s not what the rules are, it’s the way that you show it: proving ‘origin’ post-Brexit

Exporters are generally required to prove the origin of goods to customs authorities. This is likely to require more time from business after Brexit, write Peter Holmes and Nick Jacob (University of Sussex). Their research finds, that while new arrangements regarding Rules of Origin will be needed, compliance is not as costly for firms as previously thought. 

The need for UK […]

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    The Lords are unlikely to derail or overly delay the passage of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill

The Lords are unlikely to derail or overly delay the passage of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill

In this blog, Richard Reid explains why the House of Lords is unlikely to derail or overly delay the passage of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill that is about to be introduced into the Chamber. He contends that while the mood of the House regarding Brexit is difficult to tell, it seems that there is little appetite for a direct collision […]

How damaging would a ‘no-deal’ Brexit be?

The UK’s decision to leave the EU has created huge uncertainty over what sort of trade agreement we might have with the bloc in the future, and the resulting tariffs that UK firms can expect to pay in order to export to the EU. Meredith Crowley, Giancarlo Corsetti, Oliver Exton, and Lu Han (Cambridge University) explain how damaging a ‘no-deal’ scenario […]

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    “Project Fear” was groundless: the UK economy has been remarkably resilient

“Project Fear” was groundless: the UK economy has been remarkably resilient

“Project Fear” has been proved pretty groundless, argues Ruth Lea, CBE (Arbuthnot Banking Group). Since the Brexit vote, the UK economy has been more robust than expected. This cannot, however, be attributed to “better-than-predicted” world growth, she maintains. The world economy’s performance in 2016 and 2017 was, in reality, much as the IMF expected.
Former Commercial Secretary to the Treasury Lord […]

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    Macron is correct: even at the heart of Europe the EU has a serious image problem

Macron is correct: even at the heart of Europe the EU has a serious image problem

Emmanuel Macron’s  words on Sunday morning regarding the result of a hypothetical ‘Frexit’ referendum shouldn’t come as a surprise, writes Joseph Downing (CNRS Aix-Marseille Université). Whilst located at the heart of Europe, France has a serious Eurosceptism problem. This, however, does not mean that it is actually heading for a ‘Frexit’, he cautions. 

Britain has often been framed as the Eurosceptic outsider, a somewhat provincial island nation nostalgic for […]

The Brexit-sized hole in the future EU budget

The UK is a net contributor to the EU budget. Following Brexit, the loss of UK contributions will therefore likely require either a reduction in overall spending, or for the remaining member states to pay more into the budget. Iain Begg explains the impact this shortfall might have as the EU seeks to negotiate its next Multi-annual Financial Framework.

Have you ever wondered […]

Rematch? The constitutional implications of a second EU referendum

Is a second EU referendum a possibility? Andrew Blick (King’s College London) outlines some of the constitutional issues that would arise should a second referendum take place. Unless these matters are given serious consideration, holding another vote is unlikely to improve matters – and might even aggravate them.
The idea of a second EU referendum of some kind, though highly controversial, is […]

January 19th, 2018|Featured, UK politics|11 Comments|
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    Watch: Tony Travers on what Brexit means for parties, the civil service and voters

Watch: Tony Travers on what Brexit means for parties, the civil service and voters

Tony Travers, Director of the Institute of Public Affairs at the LSE, examines the impact of Brexit on the political parties, on the civil service and more broadly on the electorate.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of the LSE Brexit blog, nor the LSE.