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    Everyday Nationhood: Theorising Culture, Identity and Belonging after Banal Nationalism

Everyday Nationhood: Theorising Culture, Identity and Belonging after Banal Nationalism

In Everyday Nationhood: Theorising Culture, Identity and Belonging after Banal Nationalism, edited by Michael Skey and Marco Antonsich, a range of contributors consider, rethink and supplement the concept of ‘banal nationalism’, originally introduced by Michael Billig. Featuring a response from Billig, this timely and engaging book underscores the importance of understanding everyday, taken-for-granted expressions of nationhood as they are reproduced in different national and transnational […]

Weaponising feminism in the Brexit debate: women’s organisations and the need for nuance

Brexit will not necessarily dismantle women’s rights, says Alice Chilcott. It does represent a threat to women’s groups that get funding and shared expertise from the EU. Unfortunately, a lack of nuance – on both sides of the Brexit debate – makes it hard to move beyond the ‘low politics’ of emotional appeals.

Just before the referendum, the Mirror and […]

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    How the Conservatives can use Brexit to improve animal welfare governance – and their image

How the Conservatives can use Brexit to improve animal welfare governance – and their image

Through re-shaping animal welfare policy in light of Brexit, the government has an historic opportunity not only to preserve the UK’s position as a global leader in this area, but also to give the Conservatives a name as a progressive party, writes Steven McCulloch. He explains how the government ought to navigate the matter.

Michael Gove, currently the Minister at […]

A special arrangement for Northern Ireland?

In this blog, Colin Harvey (left) and Nikos Skoutaris outline what could be the special arrangements for Northern Ireland post-Brexit. They claim that formal recognition of the particular circumstances of Northern Ireland by UK government needs to take place in order to safeguard the Good Friday Agreement and the peace process.

The negotiations on Brexit continue and are intensifying. Northern Ireland has […]

Switzerland wanted more immigration controls, but economic self-interest will probably prevail

Four years ago the Swiss voted to curb the freedom of movement of people between their country and the EU. Faced with the threat of a breakdown in its bilateral agreements with the EU, the government implemented only minor changes. With a further vote in prospect, Pascal Sciarini (University of Geneva) argues that economic realism is likely to win […]

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    Indians wanted us out, Europeans want us to stay. This time British citizens will bear almost all the costs

Indians wanted us out, Europeans want us to stay. This time British citizens will bear almost all the costs

European nations, who were once sworn enemies, are now living in a world that the Indian subcontinent can only dream of. Sony Kapoor (Re-Define) says the history of the British exit from India as a reminder that the peace and prosperity the EU has delivered, including to the UK, cannot be taken for granted. He warns that while the calamity of ‘Brexit’ from […]

Brexit is not inevitable. These are the steps Parliament could take to halt it

Brexit is likely but not inevitable, argues Steve Bullock. He sets out the steps Parliament could take to halt the process, providing that – as senior EU figures have signalled – Article 50 can be revoked.

Only nine months ago the government was still talking about no deal being better than a bad deal. MPs were fighting for a meaningful vote […]

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    Assessing the impact of new European defence initiatives on transatlantic relations

Assessing the impact of new European defence initiatives on transatlantic relations

The European Union is in the process of implementing a number of new defence initiatives, notably a new Permanent Structured Cooperation on security and defence (PESCO) and a European Defence Fund. Antonio Calcara examines how these new initiatives are likely to affect relations with the United States, with some figures in the US already expressing concern that the new […]

“No, where are you really from?”: Being a UK citizen of colour living in the EU27

To be recognised as British abroad while also being a person of colour means answering uncomfortable questions about where you are really from. Since November 2017, Chantelle Lewis (Goldsmiths, University of London) has been interviewing UK citizens of colour who permanently reside within the EU27, as part of the UK in a Changing Europe (ESRC) funded project Brexit Brits Abroad. Brexit as a […]

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    Taking back control? The impact of Brexit on the immigration of third country nationals and asylum seekers

Taking back control? The impact of Brexit on the immigration of third country nationals and asylum seekers

Natascha Zaun (LSE), reflects upon the situation for third-country nationals, especially asylum seekers, wishing to come to the UK whilst it is part of the EU. Focusing on policies such as the Dublin Regulation, she asks how the situation could change after Brexit, and argues that the UK has more control over third-country migration than Brexit campaigners imply. 

The Brexit […]