Foreign policy

The lights are flashing red in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland politics has been brought to a standstill by a combination of geopolitics (Brexit) the novel (a crisis in the Executive over alleged corruption) and the permanent (sectarianism). Duncan Morrow (Ulster University) says little is now propping up Northern Ireland’s institutions. Without a Brexit agreement and commitment to institutional reform, the current impasse already has done real damage […]

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    Lessons from Norway: The case for a second referendum on Brexit

Lessons from Norway: The case for a second referendum on Brexit

Britons did not vote over what type of relationship or association the UK should have with the EU post-Brexit. The UK should hold a second referendum over the final deal of the negotiations with the EU. In this blog, Erik O. Eriksen (ARENA Centre for European Studies) draws on Norwegian experiences in arguing that there should be a second […]

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    The UK will need to redouble its efforts to remain influential in international development policy after Brexit

The UK will need to redouble its efforts to remain influential in international development policy after Brexit

The EU is a significant partner for UK development objectives and UK aid represents an important proportion of the EU’s development budget. The UK spent £1.5 billion of its 2016 aid budget through the European Commission and European Development Fund. Does Brexit mean the UK fully withdraws from European international development efforts, and if so, how could that affect […]

State aid and Brexit: the temptation for political intervention

State aid is currently regulated by the EU and, after Brexit, the government intends to transpose the rules into UK legislation, with the Competitions and Markets Authority overseeing the issue. Totis Kotsonis (Eversheds Sutherland) explains why future governments could be tempted to allow political intervention that EU membership precludes. 
The UK government has recently indicated its intention to transpose the EU state […]

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    How will Brexit shape conflict resolution between the UK and other European countries?

How will Brexit shape conflict resolution between the UK and other European countries?

How will Brexit shape conflict resolution within and between EU member states? In this post, Johannes Karreth (Ursinus College) observes that Brexit may pose a challenge not only to peace in Ireland but also for disputes between the UK and other European countries, such as the recent Franco-British “scallop war”, that the EU has helped to keep at bay. […]

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    A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

The UK is set to leave the EU in March next year, but many of the key issues remain unresolved and there is now perceived to be a very real prospect of the country leaving without a deal in place. For Helmut K Anheier, the answer is not a second referendum given another vote would do little to resolve the […]

Playing with fire: Brexit and the decay of the Good Friday Agreement

To Brexit negotiators, Northern Ireland is a complex nuisance. But the crisis has exposed the slow decay of the Good Friday Agreement and the EU multilateralism that was holding this divided society together, writes Duncan Morrow (Ulster University). The bedrock of co-operation between London and Dublin is shattering and the consequences may be lasting.

Putting an end to decades of […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 10: Brexit and multilateralism

Multilateral institutions – from the EU to NATO to the G-summits – are under strain. How does Brexit fit into this trend? Horatio Mortimer (LSE) reports on an expert discussion held at the LSE under Chatham House rules in June 2018.
Brexit, Germany and the multilateral system
Brexit is bad news for the EU, and perhaps especially for Germany, the EU’s largest and […]

Soft Rock: the power shifts in Madrid and London could help Gibraltar

Gibraltar’s border with Spain, and its economic dependence on financial services, mean it has a lot to lose from a hard Brexit. Chris Grocott (University of Leicester) looks at the implications of a new Spanish government and the departures of Boris Johnson and David Davis.

June’s change in the Spanish government has been welcomed in Gibraltar. The hard-line Partido Popular has been replaced by a coalition […]

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    The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

To explain why trading European markets for Chinese is not a simple switch, Jeremy Green (University of Cambridge) examines the City of London Corporation’s role within economic policy-making, as well as the embrace of Chinese finance under the Coalition government.

These are extraordinarily turbulent times for the City of London. Over the past decade, it has faced two major challenges. From […]