Foreign policy

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    The extent of Russian-backed fraud means the referendum is invalid

The extent of Russian-backed fraud means the referendum is invalid

Four separate reports have fatally undermined the Brexit vote, argues Ewan McGaughey (King’s College London). They show how Russia used the Leave campaigns, official and unofficial, to sway the referendum. A case soon to be heard in the High Court will argue that the result should consequently be deemed void.

Four reports from the US and UK on the Brexit […]

Learning from Salisbury: UK sanctions policy after Brexit

Uncertainty surrounds most aspects of the Brexit negotiations, but in the sphere of sanctions there is a legal framework that provides guidance on what happens after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. However, writes Anna Nadibaidze (Open Europe), the UK may choose to go its own way on occasion – particularly after situations like the Salisbury poisonings. 

The UK will remain part […]

Universities are a bargaining chip in the Brexit free-trade future

Higher education – although clearly not a government priority – is becoming a bargaining chip as the UK considers its future outside the EU. Anne Corbett (LSE) examines the May government’s proposal to treat higher education as a sweetener for free trade deals, an idea that is likely to have life in it whatever the immediate Brexit outcome.

Spare a thought […]

The lights are flashing red in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland politics has been brought to a standstill by a combination of geopolitics (Brexit) the novel (a crisis in the Executive over alleged corruption) and the permanent (sectarianism). Duncan Morrow (Ulster University) says little is now propping up Northern Ireland’s institutions. Without a Brexit agreement and commitment to institutional reform, the current impasse already has done real damage […]

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    Lessons from Norway: The case for a second referendum on Brexit

Lessons from Norway: The case for a second referendum on Brexit

Britons did not vote over what type of relationship or association the UK should have with the EU post-Brexit. The UK should hold a second referendum over the final deal of the negotiations with the EU. In this blog, Erik O. Eriksen (ARENA Centre for European Studies) draws on Norwegian experiences in arguing that there should be a second […]

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    The UK will need to redouble its efforts to remain influential in international development policy after Brexit

The UK will need to redouble its efforts to remain influential in international development policy after Brexit

The EU is a significant partner for UK development objectives and UK aid represents an important proportion of the EU’s development budget. The UK spent £1.5 billion of its 2016 aid budget through the European Commission and European Development Fund. Does Brexit mean the UK fully withdraws from European international development efforts, and if so, how could that affect […]

State aid and Brexit: the temptation for political intervention

State aid is currently regulated by the EU and, after Brexit, the government intends to transpose the rules into UK legislation, with the Competitions and Markets Authority overseeing the issue. Totis Kotsonis (Eversheds Sutherland) explains why future governments could be tempted to allow political intervention that EU membership precludes. 
The UK government has recently indicated its intention to transpose the EU state […]

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    How will Brexit shape conflict resolution between the UK and other European countries?

How will Brexit shape conflict resolution between the UK and other European countries?

How will Brexit shape conflict resolution within and between EU member states? In this post, Johannes Karreth (Ursinus College) observes that Brexit may pose a challenge not only to peace in Ireland but also for disputes between the UK and other European countries, such as the recent Franco-British “scallop war”, that the EU has helped to keep at bay. […]

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    A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

The UK is set to leave the EU in March next year, but many of the key issues remain unresolved and there is now perceived to be a very real prospect of the country leaving without a deal in place. For Helmut K Anheier, the answer is not a second referendum given another vote would do little to resolve the […]

Playing with fire: Brexit and the decay of the Good Friday Agreement

To Brexit negotiators, Northern Ireland is a complex nuisance. But the crisis has exposed the slow decay of the Good Friday Agreement and the EU multilateralism that was holding this divided society together, writes Duncan Morrow (Ulster University). The bedrock of co-operation between London and Dublin is shattering and the consequences may be lasting.

Putting an end to decades of […]