LSE Commission

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    Permalink Canada has imposed a particularly high tariff on imported butter. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/artbystevejohnson/".Steve Johnson</a> via a <a href=CC-BY-2.0 licence" />Gallery

    They won’t like a bit of British butter on their bread: the problem of tariffs after Brexit

They won’t like a bit of British butter on their bread: the problem of tariffs after Brexit

Countries impose customs duties on imported goods. How would UK exports be affected if we left the EU’s Common Customs Tariff regime? Michael Johnson explains how the tariff schedule works, and that some products (such as food, vehicles and electronics) are subject to much higher duty than others. Abolishing all tariffs, as some pro-Brexit economists have proposed, is unrealistic because industries […]

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    Ever closer to different destinations: how the renegotiation changed the EU’s aims

Ever closer to different destinations: how the renegotiation changed the EU’s aims

The EU is the result of an ongoing creative project, write Simon Glendinning and Roch Dunin-Wąsowicz, who report on the last session of the LSE Commission on the Future of Britain in Europe. Tracing its Kantian origins, they explain that historically, the idea of “ever-closer union” was conceived as a way of overcoming the pathologies of national states. This ambition […]

The £8bn question: would local councils be better off outside the EU?

Local authorities are due to receive £8bn in EU funding between 2014 and 2020. But would leaving the EU free up money to be spent more wisely and with fewer administrative obstacles? Dominic Leigh (left) and Ben Ramanauskas, both of Localis, make the cases to Remain and Leave on behalf of local government.
The case to Remain
Much of the debate surrounding the […]

Jobs are good ones: addressing the factors that attract EU migrants to the UK

As one of the founding principles of the EU’s single market, the right to freedom of movement allows EU citizens to travel freely across the 28 Member States and to take up work in a place of their choosing. With very high numbers of EU citizens arriving in the UK in recent years, advocates of a Brexit often argue that this right has […]

Playing the game without a say in the rules: how Britain would trade outside the EU

Pro-Brexit campaigners are keen to cut tariffs. But tariffs only play a small role in international trade, says Steve Woolcock. Much more costly are the non-tariff barriers, such as border controls, customs and food standards and regulations, and these are shaped by preferential agreements such as the EU’s single market or TTIP. Were Britain to leave the EU, it would still […]

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    What price autonomy? Brexit’s effect on Britain’s soft power, trade deals and European security

What price autonomy? Brexit’s effect on Britain’s soft power, trade deals and European security

How would a Brexit affect the foreign policy of the UK – and the EU? Experts from the UK and other EU member states discussed this question at an LSE Commission session chaired by Spyros Economides and Mareike Kleine, which focussed on the debates surrounding sovereignty, diplomacy, Nato, security and trade. The participants agreed that the apparently greater autonomy the UK would […]

Laws born out of trauma: in defence of the EU’s conception of human rights

With both the EU and human rights demonised in public discourse, Catherine Dupré sets out to redeem the concepts from their critics. She argues that the EU’s conception of human rights, as codified in its Charter of Fundamental Rights, defines a set of absolute rights borne out of wartime trauma and transcending the limitations of a conception of the human that […]

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    The Political Quarterly: Key issues in the negotiations about Britain’s membership of the EU

The Political Quarterly: Key issues in the negotiations about Britain’s membership of the EU

In the run-up to the referendum, the LSE arranged a series of expert hearings within its own Commission on the Future of Britain in Europe. The first four hearings dealt with important policy issues : migration, employment regulation, financial integration and, finally, higher education and research. A new series of articles in The Political Quarterly draws on these discussions […]

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    Brexit poses serious political ramifications for the rest of the EU

Brexit poses serious political ramifications for the rest of the EU

It is not obvious if the EU would lose or gain from a Brexit, writes Lorenzo Codogno. Judging from trade and investment flows, the divorce should have less of a negative impact on the rest of EU than on the UK. Some service sector businesses could potentially relocate to the EU, and the area could divert foreign direct investment from […]

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    Ever Closer Union — neither a goal nor an aspiration, but a process

Ever Closer Union — neither a goal nor an aspiration, but a process

“Ever Closer Union” is frequently seen as an almost metaphysical aspiration with little  political substance; or alternatively as a categorical imperative for the creation a “European Super-State”. Brendan Donnelly, who took part in the LSE Commission on the Future of Britain in Europe on the matter, writes that instead the phrase is best thought of as neither a cloudy aspiration, nor a […]