Migration

The language of nationalism: what to make of the leaked immigration plans

What should we make of the leaked document on EU immigration post-Brexit? Taking a much harder line than the official negotiating stance, it set out a vision in which EU migrants lose their rights as individuals and are admitted only if they serve the collective needs of the UK. This is a dangerously nationalistic stance, says Georgiana Turculet (Central […]

It’s all relatives: the trouble with post-Brexit family reunification plans

Who is a family member? This question is at the heart of the ambiguities surrounding the UK’s offer to EU citizens post-Brexit, writes Katya Ivanova (LSE). The proposal seeks to align the rules governing family unification for EU citizens with those currently applied to non-EU citizens. It also seeks to bring EU citizens under the control of the UK legal […]

Has Brexit made the UK less attractive to high-skilled EU migrants? New evidence

Several UK employers and business representatives have expressed concern that Brexit could damage the country’s ability to attract skilled workers from the rest of the EU. Matthias Busse (left) and Mikkel Barslund (Centre for European Policy Studies) use LinkedIn data to examine whether these concerns are justified. They find support for the view that Brexit has reduced the attractiveness of the UK for recent high-skilled […]

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    ‘The brightest and best’, us – and the rest: desirable and undesirable migration in EU referendum leaflets

‘The brightest and best’, us – and the rest: desirable and undesirable migration in EU referendum leaflets

How did the leaflets circulated before the EU referendum talk about migrants? Alexandra Bulat (UCL SSEES) examines the LSE’s collection and finds – on both sides – a distinction between ‘desirable’ and ‘undesirable’ migrants, whether from within or outside the EU. At no point were the views of the migrants themselves heard.

Researchers agree that immigration, alongside economics, were the […]

September 15th, 2017|Campaigns, Featured, Migration|0 Comments|

Warning: the cost of Brexit could seriously damage your health service

Leaving the EU would free up more money for the NHS, according to Leave campaigners. This pledge has been all but disowned – and in any case, writes Joan Costa Font (LSE), Brexit will impose further costs on an already cash-strapped service. The biggest effect will be on wage bills, but it will also restrict choice for Britons and raise procurement costs.

Healthcare and […]

When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

All EU migrants are not equal when it comes to residency rights, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of […]

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    Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals are likely to favour graduates

Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals are likely to favour graduates

Businesses that rely on low-skilled EU labour may face hiring difficulties, writes Jonathan Wadsworth. He argues that post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will probably favour graduates.

Had things gone as most commentators expected, the UK would now be entering hard Brexit talks with the near certainty of leaving the single market and/or customs union and the consequent ending of […]

First bargaining chips, now stocktaking: the plan to register EU citizens

EU citizens living in the UK will reportedly be asked to register in ‘a first step towards regularising’ their legal status post-Brexit. But the purpose of this move is unclear, writes Tanja Bueltmann. It comes after a year of uncertainty during which many EU citizens, concerned about their future in the UK, have decided to leave. And it offers no […]

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    The net migration target is one of the strangest political fetishes in recent history

The net migration target is one of the strangest political fetishes in recent history

The net migration target is one of the strangest political fetishes of modern political history, writes Jonathan Wadsworth. He argues that it is far from obvious why any government would seek to target something over which it has very little control. Even if migration from the EU fell to zero, the net migration numbers would be way above the […]

Breaking up families is easy to do: family reunification post-Brexit

Will EU citizens living in the UK be able to keep the rights they have enjoyed up to now? Or will the UK’s unusually harsh family reunification laws apply to them? Katya Ivanova (left) and Georgiana Turculet predict that the Brexit negotiations will reignite domestic debates around citizens’ core family rights. The authors outline four possible outcomes of the negotiations. […]