UK politics

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    There May be trouble ahead: post-EU referendum instability will keep afflicting the UK

There May be trouble ahead: post-EU referendum instability will keep afflicting the UK

In advance of the election, Theresa May claimed that a resounding victory would enhance her bargaining position in the coming negotiations with the EU. Andrew Blick (King’s College London and the Federal Trust) has long argued that the size of the UK  government majority would not be a preeminent concern for the EU, and would not in itself lead to their […]

When EU laws are repatriated, will all the power go to Westminster?

‘Taking back control’ of laws from the EU was a major theme of the Leave campaign. But when an EU law applies to a devolved power, should Westminster, Stormont, Edinburgh or Cardiff take back the control? For the devolved nations, the answer is obvious; but the UK government argues it needs control of many powers in order to maintain […]

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    A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

The prospects for ‘frictionless’ and ‘invisible’ solutions for the Irish border after Brexit are limited. Dr Katy Hayward (Queen’s University Belfast) outlines a ‘practical’ summary of the difference that would be made by a ‘hard’ Brexit to the movement of goods across the Irish border. 

Michel Barnier’s dismissal of the notion of ‘frictionless’ trade between the UK and EU after Brexit […]

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    Brexit is a fascinating case study for the next generation of students and teachers of British and European politics

Brexit is a fascinating case study for the next generation of students and teachers of British and European politics

Brexit is both a boon and a bane to the teaching and study of British and European politics. For Dr Tim Oliver of LSE and Alex Boyle, a politics student at the University of Liverpool, there are five ways in which Brexit is central to the study and teaching of both.

As a student learning the politics of Europe […]

The £1bn bung won’t protect Northern Ireland from the pain of a hard Brexit

The government has paid dearly for the support of the Democratic Unionist Party. Anthony Costello looks at what Northern Ireland will get in exchange for propping up the Conservatives. The irony is that £1bn in extra public spending is unlikely to compensate for the effects of Brexit on a region which is heavily dependent on agriculture and which has […]

What makes a Tory MP rebel – and what are their red lines on Brexit?

The Conservatives now depend on the Democratic Unionist Party to push through legislation in the Commons – but can Theresa May even rely on her own MPs to back her on Brexit? Philip Cowley looks at the factors that prompt MPs to rebel and what we know about the views of Tory MPs. He finds there will be plenty of scope […]

A chaotic Brexit is still a possibility

The terms of the political debate about Brexit in the aftermath of the General Election are gradually becoming clearer. Since the Brexit project is an essentially irrational one, its discussion will always tend towards paradox and conundrum. Nevertheless, the weeks since the General Election have clarified the choices with which the British government and other political actors are likely […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 3: Whitehall feels the strain

In the third of LSE’s Continental Breakfasts – held under Chatham House rules, so participants can speak as freely as they wish – a roundtable discussed the immense challenges facing Whitehall as it gets to grips with Brexit. Philipp Dreyer reports on some of the key points.

The task Whitehall faces in delivering the government’s Brexit strategy is immense and unprecedented. Not even […]

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    The Brexit vote and General Election were both about austerity and inequality

The Brexit vote and General Election were both about austerity and inequality

The unexpected result of the general election is just another case of voters punishing governments for their handling of the economy, writes Jonathan Hopkin. He argues citizens have had enough of an economic system that deliberately benefits only the few. Established political parties have failed to provide a vision for change, and so new political leaders who do so […]

A mountain to climb: the looming problem of the Northern Irish border

For all practical purposes, writes Filippo Biondi, the border between Eire and Northern Ireland has disappeared. Thirty thousand people cross the 500km line each day just in order to go to work. So what will happen when it becomes the land border between the EU and the UK? He analyses the Democratic Unionist Party’s priorities and looks at possible […]