UK politics

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    UK governance after Brexit: yet more variable and even more disjointed

UK governance after Brexit: yet more variable and even more disjointed

Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon write that, although May’s government has been prepared to make various concessions in its dealings with the devolved governments, tricky intergovernmental negotiations relating to Brexit are in line. How these will be managed will be one of the most difficult aspects of the Brexit process.

Cabinet Office minister David Lidington recently delivered (to little […]

The future of referendums: what role should they play and how should they be conducted?

Two decades have passed since there was last a serious consideration of how the UK uses referendums. For this reason, the Constitution Unit established the Independent Commission on Referendums to examine whether and how the way in which referendums are regulated in the UK should be changed. Alan Renwick (University College London) explains its terms of reference. 
The referendum is now […]

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    Brexit is clouding the economic horizon, keeping both investment and productivity low

Brexit is clouding the economic horizon, keeping both investment and productivity low

This is one of the most uncertain periods for the UK for a long time. Brexit is clouding the horizon, keeping both investment and productivity low. Vicky Pryce (CEBR), explains what’s at stake for the UK economy.

On the face of it, the economy has proved reasonably resilient since the referendum, which is hardly surprising given the very strong economic growth in […]

What was wrong with the Brexit referendum – and would also be wrong with a second

Depending on their design, referendums can be bad for democracy, writes Joseph Lacey (Oxford University). He argues that the central problem with the Brexit referendum was its ad hoc nature. Any second referendum would be of a similar sort and so should be avoided. But there is a way of legitimately deciding upon questions of EU membership: through the mandatory […]

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    Agriculture post-Brexit: a battleground for the UK’s constituent nations

Agriculture post-Brexit: a battleground for the UK’s constituent nations

Agriculture is a devolved matter which is also subject to EU policy-making. Michael Keating (Centre on Constitutional Change) writes that while there is agreement on the need for UK-wide frameworks to govern certain areas of agriculture post-Brexit, there is currently no agreement among the UK’s nations on what form they should take. He argues that funding will likely be […]

How trade unions are mobilising around the challenges of Brexit

Not all trade unionists wanted to stay in the EU. Nonetheless, Brexit poses a number of challenges for the labour movement. Steve French (Keele University) looks at the three areas on which unions plan to campaign – the regional and sectoral impacts of leaving the EU, and the risk that future free trade agreements will be negotiated with corporate rather […]

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    Sinn Fein won’t drop its abstentionist policy over Brexit – and that’s not necessarily a bad thing

Sinn Fein won’t drop its abstentionist policy over Brexit – and that’s not necessarily a bad thing

Sean Swan (Gonzaga University) provides a brief history of how Sinn Fein came to adopt its abstentionist policy and explains why it will not change a century-long stance to help defeat Brexit in Westminster. He writes that if they were to drop abstentionism, dissident republican organisations would gain support, to the detriment of the peace process. At the same […]

Hate crime did spike after the referendum – even allowing for other factors

Did hate crime spike after the referendum? While there is no doubt the number of reported crimes increased, they are always more frequent in June and July and after other significant events, like terror attacks. After controlling for these factors, Daniel Devine (University of Southampton) finds the referendum was associated with a statistically significant rise in hate crime. But how much, and what […]

Sub-national government can only watch and wait as Brexit grows nearer

Brexit negotiations are conducted in London and Brussels. With so much uncertainty about the final shape of any Brexit deal, and no clear immigration policy yet, local and sub-national government is finding it very hard to plan, writes Tony Travers (LSE). The trade deals the government hopes to do will affect regions in different ways – but none can […]

Will Polish nationals feel at home in Scotland after Brexit?

How does it feel to be a Polish national in Scotland after the EU referendum? Kate Botterill (Edinburgh Napier University) discusses how the result and subsequent uncertainty affected them, and the strategies they have adopted to deal with it. Post-Brexit, the Scottish Government want a different approach to migration from the rest of the UK, which may lead to […]