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    Hubert Butler Essay Prize: the UK risks being torn further apart by Brexit than it has been already

Hubert Butler Essay Prize: the UK risks being torn further apart by Brexit than it has been already

The UK risks being torn further apart by Brexit than it has been already. In this blog, Victoria Mason argues that one cannot conflate national identity and Euroscepticism, because the meaning of national identity is multivalent, changing, malleable, and conflicted: nowhere more so than in the UK, and especially in Northern Ireland. In result of the Brexit vote, however, antithetical […]

November 30th, 2018|Uncategorized|3 Comments|

The rhetoric of self-preservation: Brexit and blame avoidance

What rhetorical strategies do Brexiteers adopt to defend their position? Sten Hansson (University of Tartu) looks at five ways that Theresa May, David Davis, Boris Johnson and Liam Fox have sought to deflect criticism of Brexit, and concludes that they risk damaging democratic debate.

In modern democracies, governments increasingly engage in blame avoiding behaviour when they adopt policies that hurt the […]

Austerity swung voters to Brexit – and now they are changing their minds

The voters most badly hit by austerity cuts were those drawn to UKIP and who supported Leave in the EU referendum, argues Thiemo Fetzer (University of Warwick). Recent polling evidence suggests that it is these same voters who are now changing their minds about Brexit.

Jeremy Corbyn, when asked in a recent interview whether he would stop Brexit if he […]

Post-Brexit transfers of personal data: the clock is ticking

The UK government would like to keep EU-UK data transfers largely the same following the country’s separation from the EU, writes J Scott Marcus (Bruegel). But talks have yet to even commence on a future data-sharing relationship, and a landmark European Court of Human Rights ruling in September bodes poorly for the UK’s future status under the EU’s General […]

BRINO satisfies no-one. The Brexit wrangles are far from over

As the cabinet pores over Theresa May’s Brexit deal, where do we stand? Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE) says even if the deal passes ministers and Parliament, the uncertainty is far from over.

In my last post for LSE Brexit, I wrote:
“Looking ahead, the prospects are not encouraging. The ‘agreement’ at Chequers and subsequent ministerial resignations reflect the fact that the time […]

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    Permalink Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin at the White House, July 2018. Photo: <a href=White House. Public domain" />Gallery

    The extent of Russian-backed fraud means the referendum is invalid

The extent of Russian-backed fraud means the referendum is invalid

Four separate reports have fatally undermined the Brexit vote, argues Ewan McGaughey (King’s College London). They show how Russia used the Leave campaigns, official and unofficial, to sway the referendum. A case soon to be heard in the High Court will argue that the result should consequently be deemed void.

Four reports from the US and UK on the Brexit […]

The EU’s negotiating strategy has worked so far, but it’s playing a risky game

In a report published recently, Oliver Patel (UCL) assesses the EU’s institutional and strategic approach to the Brexit negotiations, and considers what the EU wants from the process. Here, he summarises the core points of the paper and outlines how the UK has been outflanked by the EU’s negotiating tactics thus far.

October’s European Council summit represented ‘more of the same’ for the Brexit […]

Brexit has already hurt EU and non-EU exports by up to 13% – new research

Over the past few months, Terence Huw Edwards (Loughborough University, left), Christian Soegaard (Warwick University) and Mustapha Douch (Aston University) have been investigating how the vote of June 23 2016 has since affected the values and patterns of Britain’s trade with major trading partners inside and outside the European Union. By comparing trade flows with a model of what […]

Universities are a bargaining chip in the Brexit free-trade future

Higher education – although clearly not a government priority – is becoming a bargaining chip as the UK considers its future outside the EU. Anne Corbett (LSE) examines the May government’s proposal to treat higher education as a sweetener for free trade deals, an idea that is likely to have life in it whatever the immediate Brexit outcome.

Spare a thought […]

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    Puffer Fish and Bargaining Chips: Why hard bargaining harms British interests

Puffer Fish and Bargaining Chips: Why hard bargaining harms British interests

When it comes to Brexit, there’s no doubt that UK negotiators have adopted a hard bargaining strategy. Benjamin Martill asks whether this is the best strategy for advancing British interests.

The New Politics of Bargaining

All eyes in British politics are on the negotiations between the UK and the EU over the terms of the forthcoming British withdrawal from the Union, […]