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    Chequers is deeply flawed: a no deal Brexit is far preferable

Chequers is deeply flawed: a no deal Brexit is far preferable

The Chequers deal is deeply flawed on both economic as well as political grounds – a “no deal” Brexit would be a far preferable solution, argues Ruth Lea. In her opinion, a Chequers-style deal would be economically sub-optimal, tying the UK to the EU’s rulebook, but without any influence. On the contrary, in the event of a “no deal” Brexit, trading under […]

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    The future of the Single Electricity Market on the island of Ireland after Brexit is yet to be agreed on

The future of the Single Electricity Market on the island of Ireland after Brexit is yet to be agreed on

A great deal of attention during the Brexit negotiations has been focused on the issue of the Irish border. However, as Meabh Cormacain writes, Brexit also has important implications for Northern Ireland’s participation in the Single Electricity Market that currently exists across the island of Ireland. She highlights that despite widespread agreement on the importance of the Single Electricity […]

Orchestral manoeuvres, in the dark: what Brexit means for touring musicians

British orchestras tour widely in the EU – and when we leave, they will probably need work permits and special social security and health insurance arrangements, as well as facing delays at the border. Mark Pemberton (Association of British Orchestras) urges the government to ensure bilateral deals are in place to minimise the extra costs involved.

Heard every day in our concert halls, […]

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    A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

A five-year moratorium on Brexit is needed to allow the UK and the EU to fully get to grips with the process

The UK is set to leave the EU in March next year, but many of the key issues remain unresolved and there is now perceived to be a very real prospect of the country leaving without a deal in place. For Helmut K Anheier, the answer is not a second referendum given another vote would do little to resolve the […]

The backstop is dividing Northern Ireland. We urgently need new talks

Brexit has become highly politicised in Northern Ireland. A damaging chasm is opening up between the two political blocs, and between the British and Irish governments, on the EU backstop. Mary C Murphy (University College Cork) argues that a compromise formula is possible, but the lack of devolved government means new efforts – and new forums – will be needed to break the stalemate.

In […]

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    Trade will not be frictionless: will a common rulebook help?

Trade will not be frictionless: will a common rulebook help?

The  White Paper for a new UK-EU partnership edges its way around the strict red lines of a hard Brexit in order to address the complaints of business and keep jobs in this country. In a surprise move, it puts forward proposals for services. Monica Horten (LSE), suggests that the ‘common rulebook’  may be a problematic metaphor in an inter-connected 21st-century […]

The UK is edging closer to a People’s Vote

The Chequers plan exposed the impossibility of Brexit. Current government proposals force the UK to adhere to the EU’s rules, without any capacity to influence them. In consequence, Parliament and the UK public are edging closer to a People’s Vote, writes Michael Cottakis (LSE).

The UK Government has told us for months that Brexit may only be Hard: only by exiting the […]

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    The Chequered path(s) to Brexit: the choice is between a soft and ambiguous exit or a hard and unattainable one

The Chequered path(s) to Brexit: the choice is between a soft and ambiguous exit or a hard and unattainable one

Daniel Kenealy and Seán Molloy outline the ‘Chequered’ path(s) to Brexit that the PM might take. They argue that the choice is between a soft and ambiguous exit or a hard and unattainable one. The unsatisfactory nature of each option may lead to the unravelling of both, and the implications may be enormous for the UK, they conclude.

The Conservative resignations […]

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    The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

To explain why trading European markets for Chinese is not a simple switch, Jeremy Green (University of Cambridge) examines the City of London Corporation’s role within economic policy-making, as well as the embrace of Chinese finance under the Coalition government.

These are extraordinarily turbulent times for the City of London. Over the past decade, it has faced two major challenges. From […]

Two souls in Europe’s breast: the attractions of EFTA for the UK

Could Britain gain from joining the European Free Trade Association? Carl Baudenbacher (Monckton Chambers and former president of the EFTA court) looks at the prevailing legal systems in Iceland, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Norway, and concludes that they share aspects of legal doctrine with the UK.

In 1992, Jacques Delors, then President of the EU Commission, said that if, over the […]