Monthly Archives: April 2016

What neuroscience can(not) bring to the world of business

Through the clinical application of neuroscience, researchers are now in a much better position to understand and treat brain-related illnesses. However, hardly a day passes without neuroscience being hailed in the media as a panacea for a variety of problems afflicting many non-clinical disciplines. Follow your imagination, and add the prefix ‘Neuro’ to any kind of existing discipline, and […]

The Silk Roads: A New History of the World – Book Review

The Silk Roads: A New History of the World. Peter Frankopan. Bloomsbury. 2015.

The marriage of Hārūn al-Rashid in 781 was a spectacle of thitherto unknown splendour. Hosted in modern-day Baghdad, the ‘heart of royal power, patronage and prestige’ (93) for an Islamic order that controlled trade routes from Afghanistan to the Atlantic Ocean, the wedding featured unprecedentedly large pearls, […]

Urbanisation drives economic growth

In 2014 the top 20 metropolitan (statistical) areas contributed more than half of the GDP produced by US economy while accounting for 44 percent of the total population and less than 5 percent of the total land area. New York City’s metropolitan area (New York-Newark-Jersey) alone represented approximately 10 per cent of the country’s total GDP and 7 per […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    To fight low wages, central banks warm to collective bargaining

To fight low wages, central banks warm to collective bargaining

Strange things are happening in the world of international economic institutions and central bankers. Whereas over the past decades the continuous focus of these institutions has been on the weakening of bargaining power of trade unions, there appears to be some kind of “change of mind” with one institution after the other as they start pointing to too low […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Students’ university degree classification affect their pay later in life

Students’ university degree classification affect their pay later in life

Since the early 1960s, with developments in the field of human capital research, analysis of the returns to education has established robust evidence of a strong positive association between earnings and years of schooling or level of qualification attained. But there has been little analysis of how returns vary according to the level of academic performance – for example, […]