Monthly Archives: December 2016

Editor picks on Brexit, Trump and the Eurozone

Brexit

Investing in the future of the UK: LSE relaunches its Growth Commission

Labour markets, industrial policy, the financial sector and openness are key areas of the upcoming report, writes Anna Valero

 

 

 

Brexit can have profound implications for firms on both sides of the Atlantic

Since 2010, 9% of foreign US affiliates’ profit has come from the UK, write Douglas Cumming and Shaker […]

December 29th, 2016|Holiday lists|0 Comments|

Five editor picks to read during the holiday

What neuroscience can(not) bring to the world of business
It cannot make better leaders nor deliver on other misleading promises, argues Dirk Lindebaum

 

 

 

 

Healing the rifts between mental health workers and psychiatric survivors

There needs to be a process where survivors and workers can work together, listen and learn from each other, writes Helen Spandler

 

 

 

The interval training principle could help us deal […]

December 28th, 2016|Holiday lists|0 Comments|

Must-read 2016 blog posts about our working lives

Flexible working:

 

Working in the cloud means working all the time

Technological advancements, such as Artificial Intelligence, Robotic Process Automation or Big Data are often considered major drivers for the future of work. Current debate on this topic mostly focuses on which tasks and jobs will be delegated to machines and how employees can deal with the uncertainty of career choice. […]

December 26th, 2016|Holiday lists|0 Comments|
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    Despite Brexit and Trump, London and NY will keep attracting real estate investors

Despite Brexit and Trump, London and NY will keep attracting real estate investors

Image by -JvL-, under a CC-BY-2.0 licence
The transnational wealth elite are a group of people who individually come from one place, but invest their wealth transnationally since they entertain transnational jobs, assets and social networks. Although these elites appear to have a geographically diverse investment portfolio, they do not invest everywhere. Indeed, their real estate investment takes place primarily in first-tier global […]

More public holidays would boost national wellbeing

Holidays, by Jim Lukach, under a CC-BY-2.0 licence
On average, people are happier during festive seasons like Christmas and New Year celebrations. What’s more, increasing the number of mandatory public holidays would improve a country’s overall wellbeing. These are the consensus findings of a new survey from leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. The wellbeing research group at LSE’s […]

Who are the discontents of globalisation?

JPMorgan London, by Håkan Dahlström, under a CC-BY-2.0 licence
The past months have been characterised by what can be called a “backlash against globalisation”. This development became most visible in the outcome of the Brexit referendum in the UK and the election of Donald Trump as the future president of the US. In both cases, the preceding campaigns massively referred to […]

Is the UK’s role in the European supply chain at risk?

Image by Francois Van, under a CC0 licence
Over the past decades the UK economy has become a party to global production chains in a number of sectors. Benefiting from tremendous investment by many of the world’s major multinational corporations, the UK has become an export leader, especially for automobiles and pharmaceutical products. We ask whether the UK’s engagement in European […]

The business value of appearing on The New York Times

The New York Times building, by Haxorjoe, under a CC-BY-SA-3.0 licence
Firms that are more visible in the press are better governed and more profitable. But investors underestimate the value of visibility and could profit from investing into high-visibility firms.

In our study, ‘The Value of Visibility’, we analyse 90 years of The New York Times’ coverage of more than 22,000 publicly listed US […]

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    Brexit can have profound implications for firms on both sides of the Atlantic

Brexit can have profound implications for firms on both sides of the Atlantic

Skyscrapers, by Unsplash, under a CC0 licence
Brexit is a monumental event that is likely to have serious consequences, raising challenges while creating international business and entrepreneurship opportunities for companies around the globe. This effect is likely to be felt acutely by North America, which has historically maintained strong political, cultural and economic relationships with the UK. The June 23, […]

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    The risk culture in financial institutions needs fixing, but how?

The risk culture in financial institutions needs fixing, but how?

Canary Wharf Skyline, by David Iliff, under a CC-BY-SA-3.0 licence
In the aftermath of the financial crisis and other large scale corporate scandals, a large number of public inquires and documents written by regulators, consulting firms and professional associations drew attention to something that needs fixing: the risk culture of financial sector organisations (see, for example, publications by the International institute of Finance, the Financial […]

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    The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy – Book Review

The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy – Book Review

The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy. Aaron Perzanowski and Jason Schultz. MIT Press. 2016.

Find this book: 

There can be little doubt that the way we consume a range of information goods has been transformed by digital content delivery. However, as the authors of The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy argue, this transformation […]

Historical perspectives on austerity can mislead

Business/cash, by PublicDomainPictures, under a CC0 licence
Christopher Hood and Rozana Himaz’s retrospective on UK austerity argues that the current ‘period of public spending restraint’ fits into a pattern of longer but less deep government actions. But their account contains a logical error that leads to underestimating both the severity of the present action and the damaging effects on the economy as a […]

December 17th, 2016|Economics, Geoff Tily|0 Comments|

Fear of fracking affects house prices in the UK

© DesignRaphael Ltd
The UK government has recently given its approval for exploratory drilling and hydraulic fracturing – ‘fracking’ – for shale gas at two sites in Lancashire. This follows a similar decision for North Yorkshire earlier in the year.

Some will see these approvals as landmark planning decisions marking the way to a low-cost energy future for the UK. For others, […]

Fracking has made US manufacturing more competitive

© DesignRaphael Ltd
In the United States, exploitation of shale gas resources through a technology called hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) started an energy revolution from the early 2000s onwards.

Fracking is now widely used across several major shale gas ‘plays’ (formations): most importantly, the Marcellus Shale of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia (see Figure 1). The surge in shale gas production has made […]

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    People are more likely to promise to help you if you ask them in person or by phone

People are more likely to promise to help you if you ask them in person or by phone

Photo by Jonathan Velasquez on unsplash.com, under a CC0 licence,
It is a busy day at work. Suddenly a colleague jumps into your office asking you to quickly review some slides for an upcoming presentation. “Could you please do me this favour by tomorrow?” she asks. Well, this task is not really related to your work, but you promise her to do the […]

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    Fed interest rates meetings: where women’s voices are rarely heard

Fed interest rates meetings: where women’s voices are rarely heard

FOMC meeting in Washington, D.C., Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Public Domain
In the wake of the great recession, the Federal Reserve gained new prominence as it kept interest rates low in an effort to prop up an ailing economy. Changes to the Fed’s interest rate are decided by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), which is made up of Fed […]

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    How the Eurozone’s core versus periphery pattern evolved over time

How the Eurozone’s core versus periphery pattern evolved over time

EU flag, by GregMontani, under a CC0 licence
Have the reports about the death of the Eurozone been greatly exaggerated? How concerned should one be about the stability of the Eurozone? This column summarises a report we prepared for the European Parliament addressing this issue.

A good way to think about the Eurozone’s stability and cohesion (or asymmetry and imbalances, if […]

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    Wealth managers shouldn’t avoid markets with complex regulations

Wealth managers shouldn’t avoid markets with complex regulations

Business centre exterior, by quinntheislander, under a CC0 licence
For many private banks, increased complexity and compliance has encouraged exits from some markets. The US is a good example. A number of private banks no longer provide services to Americans because of the aggressive enforcement of US tax, securities and other laws by the authorities — in part as a reaction […]

The underestimated effects of regional trade agreements

Hamburg Port, by moerschy, under a CC0 licence
Over the past three decades, countries and trading blocks around the world have undertaken substantial efforts to reduce barriers to trade. In recent years, these efforts have mainly taken the form of regional free trade agreements (RTA) in which countries liberalize trade outside the multilateral framework of the World Trade Organization.

The hope […]

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    A matter of principles: the psychodynamics of solidarity in trade unions

A matter of principles: the psychodynamics of solidarity in trade unions

People walking on gray pavement, by Unsplash, under a CC0 licence
Despite women working in higher education still being paid 12 per cent less than men and half of all teaching staff on precarious contracts, last month 57 per cent of my union’s members voted against taking industrial action over decent pay in education. You don’t need to be an […]