Monthly Archives: December 2017

Seven pieces of career advice

December 28th, 2017|Reading List|0 Comments|

Reading list: seven leading LSE women researchers

 

Anna Valero (Centre for Economic Performance):

Budget 2017: productivity is the focus, but ‘fixes’ are unlikely to be enough

 

Beverley Skeggs (International Inequalities Institute):

Wake up, algorithms are trawling your phone while you sleep

 

Connson Locke (Department of Management):

Are you a leader or a manager?

 

Emily Jackson (Department of Law):

Egg freezing has little to do with inflexible workplaces

 

Shani Orgad (Department of Media and Communications)

Women who quit their careers: a group rarely investigated

 

Sonia Livingstone (Department of Media and Communications)

A complex web of factors influence children’s commercial media literacy

 

Susanna Khavul (Department of Management):

Crowdfunding solves market failures in new venture financing


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December 26th, 2017|Reading List|0 Comments|

Brexit readiness score update: UK gets 22 out of 100

In the past three months the possibility of an orderly Brexit has increased markedly. In particular, the European Union and United Kingdom have negotiated a transition period lasting two years. And several thorny issues around the treatment of EU citizens in the United Kingdom have been clarified.

The inaugural Brexit Readiness Score gave low grades on the preparedness of the […]

Why economists are relaxed about bitcoin

Cryptocurrencies have been a staple of news headlines in 2017. As the price of one bitcoin has risen 12-fold in sterling terms during the course of 2017, the number of Google searches for bitcoin has increased 14-fold. There are now more than 2,000 cryptocurrency ATMs across the globe, with the United States (1,107), Canada (293), the UK (97) and […]

Socially responsible investment is growing at a fast clip

The Paris Agreement on climate change took place in December 2015 with signatories agreeing to keep the rise in global temperatures below 2 degrees Celsius (above pre-industrial levels). The most recent follow-up meeting took place in Bonn, Germany in November. Politicians, NGOs and regulators have taken the lead, but they need the financial services industry to put its money […]

December 19th, 2017|Environment, Tim Fright|0 Comments|

What causes asset price bubbles?

Why do asset price bubbles in real markets happen? Experimental asset markets have pursued the reasons for a long time. Our research clarifies them by distinguishing between two effects, confusion and strategic uncertainty.

The asset price bubbles observed in real markets are often regarded as irrational exuberance, as pointed by Professor Robert Shiller (Nobel laureate in 2013). However, we succeed […]

Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People – Book Review

Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People. Timothy Morton. Verso. 2017.

Find this book: 

When I think about a climate-changed future, I tend to picture something terrifying like Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road. It is grey. There is scarcity, extinction, doom. Yet, it doesn’t have to be like that, suggests Timothy Morton, in Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People: we can even do better […]

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    Completion of the Eurozone may not be as improbable as it once appeared

Completion of the Eurozone may not be as improbable as it once appeared

When it comes to the Eurozone, agreement is hard to find. One thing we have been agreeing on for quite a while now, however, is that the common currency remains a very long way from having the fiscal and banking unions that it arguably needs to be considered ‘complete’. The long-recognised problem in the Eurozone is simply stated: while monetary policy […]

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    What if we all governed the Internet? Or what if we didn’t?

What if we all governed the Internet? Or what if we didn’t?

Multistakeholder participation in Internet governance supports, broadly speaking, the participation of all relevant stakeholders in the development of rules, norms and other governance mechanisms that have a potential impact on the evolution and use of the Internet. Such extensive collaboration has enabled the Internet to benefit from the perspectives and input of a variety of actors relatively devoid of the potentially […]

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    In pursuit of economic security: from reciprocity to real estate

In pursuit of economic security: from reciprocity to real estate

Market liberals assume that people can look after themselves. But much of the time they cannot. Dependency on others is inevitable during motherhood, infancy and childhood, education, illness, disability, unemployment, and old age. There may be no agency, no two feet to stand on, nothing to sell, no bargaining power and limited cognitive capacity. The welfare challenge is not […]

What are we talking about when we talk about mobility?

Mobility is a polysemic notion. We here only allude to geographical mobility, understood as physical movement in a professional setting. It may refer to working in a different space than the usual one, as well as to professional trips (whether these are systematic or not). Add to that daily commuting between home and the workplace, which, according to the […]

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    Emotionally intelligent employees are a competitive advantage

Emotionally intelligent employees are a competitive advantage

In today’s hypercompetitive world, it is more important than ever to have highly engaged, committed workers. Employees with high job satisfaction and organisational commitment have higher job performance. Satisfied people are more productive. Moreover, employees with high job satisfaction and organisational commitment have lower turnover intentions. This can keep costly turnover down and help organisations retain knowledgeable, well-trained, and […]

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    Scaling impact finance in Kenya: A look at micro, small and medium enterprises

Scaling impact finance in Kenya: A look at micro, small and medium enterprises

A financial inclusion-focused entity recently engaged us to exercise due diligence on a working capital microcredit venture, with the intent of investing $1 million in equity in the business. Chief amongst the requirements was the evidence of employment creation brought about by the extension of credit to micro, small and medium enterprises. This was illuminating on two fronts. On one […]

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    Should you disclose an invisible disability in a job interview?

Should you disclose an invisible disability in a job interview?

Individuals with invisible disabilities face a dilemma when applying for work: Do I disclose my disability to the potential employer and, if so, how? This dilemma occurs because disabled applicants face potential biases that hinder perceptions of their employability: Although hiring managers might feel sorry for or pity these applicants they may not want to hire them because of […]

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    ‘Sharding’ and the search for a way to scale up blockchain

‘Sharding’ and the search for a way to scale up blockchain

Advocates of blockchain technology often expound its ability to deliver a disruptive layer of efficiency to existing industries that provide consumers goods and services. They might speak of how, by removing centralised trust from the equation of transaction verification, blockchain-based systems will provide a means of disintermediation that could save industries untold sums of capital that is otherwise lost […]

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    Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk about It) – Book Review

Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk about It) – Book Review

Find this book: 

Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk about It). Elizabeth Anderson. Princeton University Press. 2017.

In Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk about It), a version of her 2015 Tanner Lectures, Elizabeth Anderson argues that modern workplaces are coercive and hierarchical institutions, a fact that is camouflaged […]

The case for ending shareholder monopoly

The UK is about to stop shareholders monopolising votes for company boards, with worker voice. Currently, asset managers control most shareholder votes in public companies. They have systemic conflicts of interest, because shareholder votes can influence companies to buy asset managers’ financial products (e.g. defined contribution pensions). But now this is changing. One small step, following government consultation, is that the Financial […]

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    Why are fewer German companies choosing to join the stock market?

Why are fewer German companies choosing to join the stock market?

An article by Kathleen Kahle and René M. Stulz on LSE Business Review analyses the shrinking number of public corporations in the US. We  find this phenomenon also in Germany. In our study, we find a decline in the number of listed companies in Germany driven by a decline in initial public offerings (IPOs) and an increase in delistings:

While […]

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    Accounting played a central role in the rise of financial capitalism as we know it today

Accounting played a central role in the rise of financial capitalism as we know it today

Since the pioneer writings of Weber and Sombart, the debate on the nexus between accounting and the rise of capitalism has caused a lot of ink to flow. Literature on the subject has focused on assessing the capacity of the double-entry form to promote “rational” decision-making based on profit calculation. While the classical approach, drawing on Weber and Sombart’s […]

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    To overcome gender bias, objective performance metrics are not enough

To overcome gender bias, objective performance metrics are not enough

It has been well established that men and women experience differences in access to social and financial capital, hiring outcomes, and performance evaluations more generally. One commonly cited explanation for these observed gender differences has to do with a lack of objective information. Specifically, in the absence of concrete information about quality or expected performance, evaluators have been found […]