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    Gender gaps in promotion: it is also because women apply less

Gender gaps in promotion: it is also because women apply less

A related recent post (Who stays longer, male or female CEOs?) documents that women account for 5 per cent of CEOs of major North American firms as of January 2018 (Catalyst). According to Bertrand and Hallock (2001), they represented 2.5 per cent of top executives in US firms in the 1990s. Even if these two figures are not perfectly […]

October 17th, 2018|CEP, Gender, LSE Authors|0 Comments|
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    Peter Trubowitz: For Trump, the principal focus on China is domestic and not geopolitical

Peter Trubowitz: For Trump, the principal focus on China is domestic and not geopolitical

Since July, the Trump administration has targeted China with growing tariffs on imported Chinese goods, with the country responding in kinds. In this interview published by Chatham House’s The World Today magazine, LSE’s US Centre director, Peter Trubowitz, comments that Trump’s trade conflict with China is more about satisfying his supporters at home rather than competing with China on […]

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    China is investing in developing countries – what is it really up to?

China is investing in developing countries – what is it really up to?

What types of energy does China finance with its development aid?

China has been steadily intensifying its economic and strategic relations with developing countries in recent years. Through deepening trade ties, large-scale infrastructure financing and its ambitious vision to create ‘seamless connectivity’ through three main infrastructure sectors (energy, transport and information and communications technology) across continents through its Belt and […]

Italy under the spotlight of another financial crisis

Ten years since Lehman and the financial crisis, the main questions on the table are whether the world has learned the lessons and what could be the source of the next financial crisis. The risk of a new recession in Europe, the end of Quantitative Easing by the ECB, and the spread of populism and Euroscepticism has put Italy […]

September 29th, 2018|Economics, LSE Authors|Comments Off on Italy under the spotlight of another financial crisis|

Harnessing diaspora assets in developing countries

Are developing countries under-utilising a wealth of diaspora resources? At the recent World Economic Forum ASEAN summit, I approached this question from three perspectives. As a contributor to the Commonwealth Secretariat’s recent survey of expatriates in London, I drew on its insights. As a former investment banker with a remit across global emerging markets, I recalled the relative differences […]

September 27th, 2018|Economics, LSE Authors|0 Comments|
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    How do children judge what’s appropriate to share online, and with whom?

How do children judge what’s appropriate to share online, and with whom?

How can social media platforms respect the “best interests of the child” if they don’t know which user is a child? How can they meet the needs of children of different ages if the law imposes “bright line” rules – 13+ (COPPA), 16+ (GDPR)? Yet how can society not extend hard-won child rights-respecting policy and practice from offline to online? And why […]

The gay glass ceiling in the UK

Empirical research on sexual orientation and work-related inequality has focused on earnings and income. Several studies have found that gay men earn significantly less than similarly situated straight men, while lesbians earn more than similarly situated straight women (e.g., see Badgett 1995; Carpenter 2007; Aksoy et al. 2018; and others).

In contrast to earnings and income, little known about sexual […]

September 5th, 2018|Gender, IGA, LSE Authors|0 Comments|
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    Climate change poses risks to the financial system. How can central banks deal with them?

Climate change poses risks to the financial system. How can central banks deal with them?

Climate change poses risks to the financial system. Yet our understanding of these risks is still limited. As we explain in a recent paper, central banks and financial regulators could contribute to the development of methodologies and modelling tools for assessing climate-related financial risks. If it becomes clear that these risks are substantial, central banks should consider taking them […]

Notes on the public debate about digital responsibility

Policymakers and the Silicon Valley giants are engaged in a battle over freedom and regulation. The UK’s Internet Commission is catalysing a new, positive cycle of organisational accountability, transparency and multi-stakeholder dialogue. The dialogue on digital responsibility brings policymakers, academics and activists together with online firms to make progress on digital responsibility and accountability.

One of the first meetings in this […]

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    Should Chinese citizens be kept away from sensitive research at US universities?

Should Chinese citizens be kept away from sensitive research at US universities?

The Trump administration 
is considering measures to restrict Chinese citizens from performing sensitive research at American universities and research institutions. The boycott appears to
 be motivated by fears that Chinese researchers may be carrying out espionage activities and handing over sensitive US discoveries to the Chinese government.

The exact details of the restrictions
 are still under discussion but they would […]

The economic consequences of family-oriented policies

All high-income countries, as well as several developing countries, have policies in place to make it easier for people to balance their working lives with their family commitments. These include parental leave, childcare support and flexible work arrangements, to name 
just a few. The impact of these policy provisions on the labour market outcomes of parents, and especially mothers, […]

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    ‘From the Anthropocene to the Anthropo-scene’- Long Read Book Review

‘From the Anthropocene to the Anthropo-scene’- Long Read Book Review

Anthropocene: A Very Short Introduction. Erle C. Ellis. Oxford UP. 2018.

Interrogating the Anthropocene: Ecology, Aesthetics, Pedagogy, and the Future in Question. jan jagodzinski (ed.). Palgrave. 2018.

Find these books:

In the year 2000, the Nobel prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen and his colleague Eugene Stoermer, a lake ecologist, published a paper in an obscure geological newsletter introducing the term ‘Anthropocene’ […]

The dangers of the global trade war for the UK

Since 2016, two of the world’s largest economies – those of the US and the UK – have made major shifts away from global economic integration. First, the British electorate voted to leave the EU. Since then, the Trump administration has sparked a global trade war which currently shows no signs of dissipating, with tariffs having already been imposed […]

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    Social resources matter — we shouldn’t assume that only money talks

Social resources matter — we shouldn’t assume that only money talks

Everyone knows that money matters and most people would accept that social resources (relationships and identities) matter too, though in what ways and how much is perhaps less obvious. In a couple of recent pieces of research (here and here) we report on evidence of surprisingly high valuations of social resources and that different personality types benefit differently from […]

August 15th, 2018|CPNSS, Economics|1 Comment|
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    When machines become sentient, we will have to consider them an intelligent life form

When machines become sentient, we will have to consider them an intelligent life form

For most of us, our understanding of robots and artificial intelligence (AI) is drawn more from science fiction than from fact. Intelligent robots are often portrayed as either a virulent threat to humanity, as seen in the Terminator series of films or in Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot, or a socially beneficial tool, as with the Star Wars robots R2-D2 […]

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    Currency unions do little to boost trade among established commercial partners

Currency unions do little to boost trade among established commercial partners

Currency unions are an important institutional arrangement to facilitate international trade and reduce trade costs. In the period since World War II, a total of 123 countries have been involved in a currency union at some point. By the year 2015, 83 countries continued to do so. In addition, various countries are considering to form new currency unions or […]

Why do large companies pay higher salaries?

Why do small establishments pay employees less than large establishments? The final pieces of this puzzle have not been found yet. This paper suggests the joint role of the division of labour and employee characteristics as an additional explanation for the firm-size wage gap.

The intuition is that individuals who work for large firms focus on a limited number of […]

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    UK entrepreneurship is doing well, but key constraints need to be addressed

UK entrepreneurship is doing well, but key constraints need to be addressed

Experts in the field of entrepreneurship recently met at the LSE to discuss reform strategies proposed in a new policy brief, which seeks to promote entrepreneurship in the UK. Mark Sanders, associate professor at the Utrecht University School of Economics, presented on behalf of the Financial and Institutional Reforms for Entrepreneurial Society (FIRES) research team, following the publication of its seven step […]

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    When a large company enters a local market, it stimulates local innovation

When a large company enters a local market, it stimulates local innovation

Cross-country investment flows are a peculiar trait of the modern economy and have been progressively increasing in the last two decades. Even with a substantial decline after the Great Recession, there were 2.86 trillion of dollars net flows in 2016, according to data published by the World Bank. There has been an intense debate on the effects of this investment on […]

How the Blitz enhanced London’s economy

The Blitz lasted from Sept 1940 to May 1941, during which the Luftwaffe dropped 18,291 tons of high explosives and countless incendiaries across Greater London. Although these attacks have now largely faded from living memory, our recent paper shows that the impact of the Blitz remains evident to this day in both London’s physical landscape and economy.

Using recently digitised National […]