LSE Authors

Are the British economy’s prospects faltering?

Until well after the turn of the year, the UK economy seemed to have shrugged off any immediate economic effects of the EU referendum. GDP growth had remained steady at an annual rate of around 2%, enabling ministers to claim the UK was the fastest growing of the major western economies; the total number of people in employment continued […]

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    Expert panel: Unemployment hurts the wellbeing of men more than that of women

Expert panel: Unemployment hurts the wellbeing of men more than that of women

Given a generally stronger social norm for men to be working in paid employment than for women, unemployment is typically worse for the wellbeing of men than women. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world.

But the experts are divided on whether unemployment is better for an individual’s happiness than […]

Employers may discriminate against autism without realising

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people connect and relate to others and also how they experience the world around them.

Most non-autistic people are not aware of the complex ways in which autistic people* experience the world and are not adequately prepared for interacting or working with autistic people. Autism is a ‘hidden’ disability, with no […]

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    How the rise of the service sector boosted the demand for women workers

How the rise of the service sector boosted the demand for women workers

The rise in female participation in the workforce has been one of the most remarkable changes in the labour markets of high-income countries since World War 2. In the U.S, for example, the employment rate of women has more than doubled from about 35 per cent in 1945 to 77 per cent at the end of the 20th century, […]

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    Lessons from Paris 2015: In multilateral negotiations, process is key

Lessons from Paris 2015: In multilateral negotiations, process is key

Recent attempts to advance international cooperation have shown the importance of a very well managed negotiation process. While the UN climate change negotiations in Copenhagen ended without official agreement in 2009, they got back on track one year later in Cancún and reached a global deal in Paris in 2015. The largest summit ever at that time, with 120 […]

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    A complex web of factors influence children’s commercial media literacy

A complex web of factors influence children’s commercial media literacy

The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) protects children’s personal data online through various measures, many still being debated. But since being approved by the EU Parliament in April 2016, it has emerged that the GDPR was formulated without consulting children or their representatives, including parents, or any evidence about children’s understanding of the commercial uses of personal data online.

Crucially, the GDPR assumes that, until they are 16 (unless member […]

The Internet and the global reach of EU law

The law of the European Union has influenced the development of the Internet outside the EU’s borders. The details of this influence are too complex to go into here, and are set out in my LSE Legal Studies working paper of the same title. But the following examples from just one Internet-related area, namely data protection and privacy law, […]

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    Strong patent rights accelerate the diffusion of new medicines across countries

Strong patent rights accelerate the diffusion of new medicines across countries

In 1999 lovastatin, a blockbuster cholesterol drug with annual peak sales of more than $1 billion in the U.S., became commercially available in Egypt — twelve years after it was first approved for sale by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Our research shows that this is not exceptional — long launch lags are common and 45 per cent […]

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    Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will likely favour graduates

Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will likely favour graduates

Had things gone as most commentators expected, the UK would now be entering hard Brexit talks with the near certainty of leaving the single market and/or customs union and the consequent ending of free movement of people from the European Union. Two weeks later and that near certainty no longer seems as certain, with murmurings of a softer Brexit […]

Why do bankers earn so much more than other professionals?

Are bankers overpaid? Do they have special qualities that make them deserve to earn more than other professionals? In this video interview, LSE professor Ulf Axelson explores why pay is so high on Wall Street relative to normal jobs.

Here is part of his answer: “(It’s) due to a combination of two characteristics of many of the types of jobs you have […]

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    The role of foreign investors in the London residential market

The role of foreign investors in the London residential market

LSE London have just completed a study of the role of overseas investors in the London residential market for the Greater London Authority, looking at the proportion of new homes sold to buyers who live abroad and at the proportion of those homes left empty; and the contribution of overseas sales and finance to new development. They found that:

Significant proportions of […]

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    It’s not that London is too big, but that other large UK cities are too small

It’s not that London is too big, but that other large UK cities are too small

The elections are barely behind us now, and we should keep asking the question, ‘What are the economic forces polarising the UK?’ A big part of the story concerns the geographical concentration of economic activity in London (and the South East). Is this concentration good for those who live or work in London but bad for those who don’t? […]

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    Brexit will probably cause disruption in markets, but systemic risk is unlikely

Brexit will probably cause disruption in markets, but systemic risk is unlikely

With less than two years until Britain leaves the EU, the implications of Brexit for financial stability are of some concern. Two key central bankers have reached opposites conclusions, with Mark Carney worried and Mario Draghi more sanguine. Broadly in line with Draghi, we think Brexit should mostly decrease systemic risk, albeit with a potential for an increase.

Brexit will […]

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    Regulating in the dark: the challenges of overseeing the secret services

Regulating in the dark: the challenges of overseeing the secret services

One of the most well-known principles in the canon of Jeremy Bentham’s writings on government is the general principle of transparency. All activities, according to Bentham, were to be made open so as to allow for external scrutiny. One sector, however, was exempted from this universal principle: the security or intelligence services. The reason for this exemption appears straightforward; […]

Managing risk in the age of disruption

The context of risk management and risk preparedness has changed in recent years.

Structural disruption

We are living through a period of multi-dimensional disruption that is often dubbed as the fourth industrial revolution. Developments in extreme connectivity and extreme automation have consequences beyond the world of technology: business models, industries, markets, regulatory, and governance regimes have been thrown into a flux. […]

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    What’s happening with real wages and living standards in the UK?

What’s happening with real wages and living standards in the UK?

As the election season progresses, an evaluation of the current labour market trends in the UK, and of possible future movements, is of significant importance is assessing the credibility of the parties’ manifesto proposals on work. This is particularly the case as, since the global financial crisis of 2007/08, workers’ real wages and family living standards in the UK […]

Flexible labour markets, real wages and economic recoveries

In its 2016 Employment Outlook, the OECD documents that real hourly wage growth has behaved quite differently across countries over the past ten years.

This is true even among the large European economies. Comparing the level of real hourly wages in the fourth quarter of 2015 with a counterfactual value based on the assumption that wages had grown according to […]

What research tells us about the avocado toast controversy

Australian millionaire and luxury property developer Tim Gurner recently suggested millennials should stop spending money on avocado toasts or expensive coffee so that they could afford to buy property. This comment started a heated debate relative to the way the young – and more generally lower income people – spend their money, and on the morality of conspicuous consumption.

The […]

Curtailing the market for private prisons: schism or blip?

For nearly 25 years, new prisons built in the UK have predominantly been procured through ‘design, build, finance and operate’ (DBFO) contracts with the private sector. So the opening earlier this year of a new supersized prison to be financed and operated by the public sector – HMP Berwyn in north Wales – puts the future of ‘whole prison’ contracting in […]

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    Airports helped boost the manufacturing sector and productivity in China

Airports helped boost the manufacturing sector and productivity in China

Airport construction or expansion is often proposed as a policy lever to boost cities, regions and national economies worldwide – although this case is not clear cut as some well publicised ‘white elephants’ and the recent debate over expansion of London’s airports testify. But it is in large developing countries with poor road and rail infrastructure that air transport […]