Resource of the week

Recommended resource: learning how to learn

Recommended by an LSE Assistant Professor, we’d like to share this online course that students can use to reconsider the ways in which they learn and discover new techniques to avoid procrastination and improve their ability to retain information.

Learning how to learn, online course from the University of California, San Diego

If you’ve got a resource you know students or […]

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Resource of the week: students as researchers

In advance of our feature post on Thursday which reports on a research methods teaching practice exchange forum held at LSE last week, our resource today comes from a Higher Education Academy project led by Helen Walkington designed to support staff who want to encourage more active engagement among students in research.

By way of background to the conceptualisation of more active student engagement in research, the teaching-research nexus […]

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Resource of the week: the relationship between research and education

As 70 lucky LSE undergraduates begin their LSE GROUPS research projects, we’re sharing a recent literature review on the links between research and education. The relationship between research and education: typologies and indicators (PDF) by Mari Elken and Sabine Wollscheid (NIFU, 2016) presents some of the key arguments in existing studies on a subject that has been keenly debated in higher […]

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Resource of the week: class participation

Tomorrow’s post features an interview with Alex Voorhoeve (from LSE’s Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method) about the use of class participation marks in evaluating and assessing students’ work. As a prelude, we’re offering here some links to resources and research on the topic.

These resources consider the advantages and challenges of evaluating class participation as well as approaches to […]

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Resource of the week: thinking like a Historian

Many academic skills (such as reading, finding resources and writing with clarity) are valued across the disciplines. At the same time, developing these skills often requires students to engage with the intellectual foundations of their specific discipline. Structuring an essay, for instance, requires a student to understand what their discipline values, and what it views as evidence.

Thinking Like […]

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