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The fragility of banks in the Eurozone’s periphery means that proposals for a European wide bank resolution fund are likely doomed to fail.

Many countries used public funds to bail out struggling banks at the onset of the financial crisis. Now, with austerity still biting, the chances of further bank bailouts by national authorities are relatively slim. Clemens Fuest examines Internal Market Commissioner Michel Barnier’s recent proposals for the European Commission to take responsibility for bank restructuring and the creation of a European […]

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After a period of political turmoil, Romania is building on its strengths and looking outwards for investment to stimulate growth.

Last year, Romanian politics was rocked with infighting between the country’s Prime Minister, Victor Ponta, and President, Traian Basescu. Clara Volintiru writes that the country has largely moved on from its political squabble, and is now positioning itself as an attractive target for investment compared with its neighbours in Central and Eastern Europe. Whether this strategy will bring the growth […]

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Despite Luxembourg heading for snap elections, long term political change seems unlikely.

Earlier this month, Luxembourg’s centre right Prime Minister Jean Claude Juncker ended a debate on the parliamentary inquiry on the dysfunctions of the Luxembourgish secret service by calling snap elections, after it became clear that he no longer had the support of his coalition partner, the social democratic party. Martine Huberty presents the background to this extraordinary event and argues that […]

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Book Review: Philosophy and Resistance in the Crisis: Greece and the Future of Europe

This book is about the global crisis and the right to resistance, about neoliberal biopolitics and direct democracy, about the responsibility of intellectuals and the poetry of the multitude. Using Greece as an example, Costas Douzinas argues that the persistent sequence of protests, uprisings and revolutions has radically changed the political landscape. This new politics is the latest example of […]

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Book Review: Global NATO and the Catastrophic Failure in Libya

Horace Campbell investigates the political and economic crises of the early twenty-first century through the prism of NATO’s intervention in Libya. He traces the origins of the conflict, situates it in the broader context of the Arab Spring uprisings, and explains the expanded role of a post-Cold War NATO. This military organization is the instrument through which the capitalist class […]

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Growing discontent within the European Union provides an opportunity for David Cameron for reform

Recent surveys suggest that Euroscepticism in Britain is most highly associated with those identifying as English. Adam Evans argues, however, that it is important to take a broader view of public attitudes to the EU. Declining levels of confidence in the institutions and policies of the Union and the repositioning of formerly enthusiastic integrationists like the Dutch and Germans appear to offer Cameron a […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 27 July – 2 August: Berlusconi’s appeal fails, France keeps up austerity pressure, and greater transparency for the ECB?

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging. The EU centre and the crisis The New Federalist looks at efforts to address youth unemployment following the June European Council summit. They say that the €8 billion that has since been allocated to tackle this problem is ‘peanuts’ towards helping Europe’s 8 million youth unemployed. They argue that more […]

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Turkey’s foreign policy moves away from the US and Israel have not met with success

As one of the few secular democracies in the Middle East, Turkey faces strategic pulls from its Islamic neighbours, and from the US over its policies towards Israel. Kostas Ifantis argues that the present government’s recent moves towards closer relations with countries like Iran, and its involvement in the Syrian civil war have thrown up a new problems, and exacerbated […]

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Trust in European justice institutions is markedly lower in Southern and Eastern Europe, but legitimacy also requires that institutions meet substantive requirements to legitimise their power and structure.

Trust in legal systems, the courts, and police varies widely across Europe, especially in former communist countries such as Ukraine, Russia and Bulgaria. Jonathan Jackson and the FIDUCIA project team argue that current social survey statistics provide only a partial picture. While they do show how much people trust institutions across Europe, they do not address whether or not the […]

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There is a significant divide in how countries of the Eurozone’s north and south react to changes in monetary policy.

The European Central Bank (ECB) is charged with maintaining price stability across the Eurozone, which it does via its monetary policies. While the euro has had some success in smoothing out the asymmetries within the Eurozone, Matteo Barigozzi finds that when the ECB changes monetary policy, the Eurozone’s southern countries experience fluctuations in prices and unemployment outside of the Eurozone’s […]

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As Armenia moves closer to the EU, Russia is taking advantage of the country’s economic and geopolitical vulnerabilities to maintain its influence.

Like many former Soviet-states, Armenia has recently pursued closer relations with the EU, much to Russia’s displeasure. Hayk Hovhannisyan looks at Russia’s increasingly punitive stance towards Armenia, such as increasing gas prices and greater arms sales to Armenia’s rival, Azerbaijan. Armenia has been trying to walk a fine line not to infuriate the ‘bear’ to the north, but now, without […]

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Book Review: The European Union in the G8: Promoting Consensus and Concerted Actions for Global Public Goods

The early 21st century can be defined by the depth of globalization and connections across continents. This level of integration also brings with it global problems, such as terrorism and the international financial crisis. The European Union in the G8: Promoting Consensus and Concerted Actions for Global Public Goods examines the relationship between two of the most important players in […]

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Book Review: Party patronage and party government in European democracies

The eurozone debt crisis and subsequent economic reforms introduced across Europe have helped to expose endemic levels of corruption and party patronage in countries such as Greece. Party patronage and party government in European democracies uses more than 600 expert interviews to explore the nature of party patronage across fifteen European democracies. For Sofia Vasilopoulou, one of this timely book’s […]

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    If the European Parliament voting system were changed to an open-list system, many voters would switch their support from UKIP to the Conservative party

If the European Parliament voting system were changed to an open-list system, many voters would switch their support from UKIP to the Conservative party

Britain currently uses a closed-list system for the European Parliament elections, allowing voters only to express support for a parties as a whole. An open-list system would allow a voter to choose a candidate from one of the mainstream political parties, whilst still expressing her preferences on the European issue through the selection of a party. Since their exists substantial intra-party diversity. Jack […]

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Edward Snowden never had a “right” to asylum

The consequences of the United States’ security service’s surveillance operations as revealed by former US National Security Agency contractor, Edward Snowden, have echoed around the world over the past month. One of the main strands of the unfolding story is Snowden’s attempts to seek asylum to avoid prosecution in the US. Geoff Gilbert takes a close look at the legal […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 20 – 26 July: Belgium’s new King, the UK’s new Prince, and a report card for Putin.

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging. The EU centre and the crisis Public Affairs 2.0 say that Europe’s industries are increasingly concerned about the reliability of energy supplies, given recent moves away from nuclear power and a lack of a comprehensive EU energy policy. Real Time Brussels looks at the often frustrating delays in the handing […]

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As questions abound about the monarchy’s role, Belgium’s new King Philippe must now convince the public of his legitimacy and credibility.

On Sunday, King Albert II of Belgium abdicated in favour of his son, Crown Prince Philippe. Benjamin Leruth looks at the challenges facing the new king in the lead up to 2014’s ‘meta-elections’, that will see Belgians go to the regional, federal and European polls. He writes that while King Philippe is now more popular than he was in previous […]

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A Eurozone-wide IMF programme could save both

In past decades, the International Monetary Fund has had a potent reputation, especially in the developing world. In its programmes in Europe, however, the IMF has had to take a back seat to the desires of the European Commission and the European Central Bank, whose policies have thus far been less than successful. In light of this, Sony Kapoor makes […]

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Policies aimed at encouraging the take-up of green cars may have unexpected results on both emissions and markets.

Road transportation currently contributes to 19 per cent of CO2 emissions in Sweden, a figure that is higher than the EU’s average. From 2007 to 2009, the Swedish government put in place a Green Car Rebate to encourage people to buy lower emission cars. Cristian Huse and Claudio Lucinda assess the effectiveness of the policy, finding that while it did […]

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Book Review: Policy Without Politicians

In Policy without Politicians a leading expert on public policy has devoted four years to interviewing middle-ranking civil servants in three languages over six jurisdictions to construct a comparative survey of bureaucratic influence on secondary legislation.  The venture may sound worthy at best, but Patricia Hogwood finds that Edward C. Page has produced a little gem: an intellectually honest, well-constructed, […]

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