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A Brexit summer reading guide

Have you been struggling to keep up with all the new books on Brexit? Were you secretly planning to spend your summer holiday catching up on some of them? OK – perhaps not. But if you were, Tim Oliver is here to help with a guide on what to take away with you to the beach or pool to focus on […]

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    Book Review: Combatants of Muslim Origin in European Armies in the Twentieth Century: Far from Jihad

Book Review: Combatants of Muslim Origin in European Armies in the Twentieth Century: Far from Jihad

In Combatants of Muslim Origin in European Armies in the Twentieth Century: Far from Jihad, Xavier Bougarel, Raphaëlle Branche and Cloé Drieu offer a collection attending to the everyday experiences and practices of the Muslim combatants who fought in the ranks of various European armies, but have hitherto been neglected in many existing historical studies. The book’s non-Anglocentric approach makes it essential reading for scholars […]

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    Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Theresa May was adamant that the UK would not accept the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. But as reality has sunk in, that red line has begun to blur. LSE Fellow Anna Tsiftsoglou explains why the ECJ is such a vital issue in the exit negotiations. To reverse David Davis’ footballing metaphor, if the UK plays in EU […]

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    CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]

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    All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

EU residency rights have gendered consequences, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of losing their status as ‘workers’ and […]

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Book Review: The Holocaust: A New History by Laurence Rees

Drawing on 25 years of research, The Holocaust: A New History offers a new major treatment of the Holocaust that traces events in their entirety from their origins to their horrifying conclusions. Gary Wilson praises Laurence Rees for this eminently readable account, which offers definitive insight into this appalling history. 
The Holocaust: A New History. Laurence Rees. Viking. 2017.
Find this book: 
It is over 30 years since Martin […]

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    ‘Oh Jeremy Corbyn’: What GE2017 taught us about the link between music and politics

‘Oh Jeremy Corbyn’: What GE2017 taught us about the link between music and politics

Does music have an effect on politics? Analysing the involvement of musicians in the UK’s 2017 general election campaign, Patrycja Rozbicka explains why we should start viewing music as a form of engagement with politics, not merely of political expression.
The phenomenon of mixing music and politics together is not new. We are familiar with New Labour using D:Ream’s ‘Things Can Only Get […]

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    Brexit can be stopped – but the window of opportunity is closing fast

Brexit can be stopped – but the window of opportunity is closing fast

The idea of a vote on the final Brexit deal is an appealing one to Remainers, says Steve Bullock. But by Christmas 2018, after acrimonious negotiations, the rest of the EU may be in no mood to give the UK a second chance. In any case, there would be no time to renegotiate before the 2019 deadline, which would mean […]

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    There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom

There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom

The UK’s Article 50 letter which triggered its exit from the European Union also indicated that the country would be leaving the European nuclear regulator Euratom following Brexit. However, several MPs, including some prominent leave campaigners, have criticised this position, arguing instead for the UK to have some form of associate membership of Euratom after it leaves the EU. […]

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    How party systems in Central and Eastern Europe affect government formation

How party systems in Central and Eastern Europe affect government formation

Coalition governments are the norm in most European countries, but how do the dynamics of coalition negotiations differ between Western European states and those in Central and Eastern Europe? Drawing on a recent study, Lee Savage illustrates that some common features of Central and Eastern European party systems, such as greater electoral volatility, can lead to coalition formation processes that […]

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    German election campaign series: CDU/CSU – “For a Germany in which we live well and enjoy living”

German election campaign series: CDU/CSU – “For a Germany in which we live well and enjoy living”

German voters will go to the polls on 24 September for federal elections. But what do the country’s parties want? What are the possible coalitions? And who has the best campaign strategy to sell their proposals to the electorate? In the first of a series of articles analysing each of the main parties’ campaign pledges, Julian Göpffarth assesses the programme […]

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    Book Review: Migration, Ethics & Power: Spaces of Hospitality in International Politics by Dan Bulley

Book Review: Migration, Ethics & Power: Spaces of Hospitality in International Politics by Dan Bulley

In Migration, Ethics and Power: Spaces of Hospitality in International Politics, Dan Bulley offers a study of the ethics and politics of hospitality, exploring how spaces are produced through various negotiations of host/guest relations. Covering such topics as refugee camps, global cities and the institutional ethos of the EU, this book is a sophisticated and nuanced conceptualisation of hospitality that will be […]

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    A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

The prospects for ‘frictionless’ and ‘invisible’ solutions for the Irish border after Brexit are limited. Katy Hayward outlines a ‘practical’ summary of the difference that would be made by a ‘hard’ Brexit to the movement of goods across the Irish border. 

Michel Barnier’s dismissal of the notion of ‘frictionless’ trade between the UK and EU after Brexit has direct ramifications for one of the […]

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    Has the Western Balkans 6 process become a ‘surrogate for the real thing’?

Has the Western Balkans 6 process become a ‘surrogate for the real thing’?

On 12 July, EU leaders met with Prime Ministers of Balkan countries in the Italian city of Trieste. Tena Prelec gives a first-hand account, writing that the ‘Western Balkans 6’ (WB6) initiative – or ‘Berlin Process’ – has had the laudable effect of keeping some attention on the Western Balkans in years when the EU enlargement process was paused, […]

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    ‘Bloody difficult’ Britain has already blown its chances of a good deal from the EU27

‘Bloody difficult’ Britain has already blown its chances of a good deal from the EU27

The run-up to the Brexit negotiations has been disastrous for the UK, writes former negotiator Steve Bullock. It has hectored and insulted the EU27’s intelligence and undermined its own credibility. The chances of securing a good deal in the time left are minimal: approaching extremely complex negotiations, Britain chose to be ‘bloody difficult’.

Being “tough” and being “difficult” are not the […]

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    Trump’s Warsaw speech was a shot in the arm for Poland in its stand-off with Brussels over migration

Trump’s Warsaw speech was a shot in the arm for Poland in its stand-off with Brussels over migration

US President Donald Trump spoke in Warsaw on 6 July before travelling to the G20 summit in Hamburg. Daniel Falkiner writes that Trump’s apparent support for Poland in its dispute with Brussels over the migration crisis risks fostering division among EU member states at a time when talk of a ‘multi-speed Europe’ is already gaining momentum in Paris and Berlin.

A […]

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Is social democracy facing extinction in Europe?

One of the more surprising aspects of Labour’s strong performance in the UK’s general election is that it came at a time when social democratic parties have experienced falling support in other countries across Europe. Davide Vittori asks whether the exceptionally poor results of parties such as the French Socialist Party in recent elections herald the end of social democracy […]

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    Book Review: Russia: What Everyone Needs to Know by Timothy J. Colton

Book Review: Russia: What Everyone Needs to Know by Timothy J. Colton

In Russia: What Everyone Needs to Know, Timothy J. Colton offers a concise yet comprehensive introduction to Russia’s current political climate. The book is refreshingly easy to read, writes April Curtis, and is rich in detailed information that will make it an excellent choice for those wanting to better understand the historical roots of Russia’s present. 
Russia: What Everyone Needs to Know. Timothy J. […]

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Four reasons why welfare reform is a delusion

Reforming the welfare system has been a key aim of British government since 2010. Richard Machin writes that the concept makes no economic sense, it does not produce the outcomes the government is seeking, all while the UK is actually spending less on welfare than countries with comparable economies.
Back in 2010, the coalition government stated that welfare reform is essential to make the […]

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    How is the European migration crisis affecting Polish politics?

How is the European migration crisis affecting Polish politics?

The migration crisis has recently re-surfaced as a major issue in Poland, as its right-wing government came under pressure from the European Commission to comply with the EU’s relocation scheme. Aleks Szczerbiak argues that most Poles are keen to avoid the problems they feel West European countries have experienced through admitting large numbers of migrants. With the opposition uncertain how to respond, […]

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