Luis Garicano

Small isn’t always beautiful: The cost of regulation on French firms

France has a raft of labour-market regulations that kick in for firms with 50 workers or more. Luis Garicano and John Van Reenen use this threshold to identify the economic effects of size-contingent regulations. Such policies seem to subsidise small firms at the expense of larger firms. But since small firms are on average less productive than large firms, the […]

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Spain’s economic problems are not being helped by attempts to disguise debt in official figures.

This week Spain formally requested 39.5 billion euros of European funds to recapitalise Spanish banks. Luis Garicano writes that one of the key issues exacerbating Spain’s economic crisis is the tendency to disguise debt in official figures. He argues that in several areas of the Spanish economy it is better to accept money has been lost, rather than spend further […]

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Ideas matter: The Financial Times’ Martin Wolf assigns the paternity of the new ECB policy to LSE Prof Paul de Grauwe

When academics influence policy, attribution from commentators and policymakers can be relatively rare. Professor Luis Garicano was therefore delighted when Martin Wolf of the Financial Times recently judged that last week’s announcement that the European Central Bank will alter the way it intervenes in bond markets owed much of its intellectual paternity to years of research and commentary by the […]

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Five minutes with Luis Garicano: “We are in a downward spiral, and it cannot be solved without efforts from Spain and from Europe”

The last few weeks have seen the market’s concerns spread from Greece to Spain which has seen its sovereign debt rates rise to levels previously unseen in the time of the Euro. In an interview with EUROPP editors Chris Gilson and Julian Kirchherr, LSE economist Luis Garicano outlines what has led to Spain’s current problems and what chances it now has […]

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