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    Put Le Pen and Macron to one side – it’s the June legislative elections that will decide how France is governed

Put Le Pen and Macron to one side – it’s the June legislative elections that will decide how France is governed

France is due to hold the first round of its presidential election on 23 April, with Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron currently predicted to make the second round of voting on 7 May. As Françoise Boucek writes, however, despite the presidential contest generating all of the headlines, the legislative elections scheduled for 11 and 18 June will be […]

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    The EU at 60: Why there is hope the future will be brighter than many expect

The EU at 60: Why there is hope the future will be brighter than many expect

The European Union is marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, which was signed on 25 March 1957. But given the UK’s decision to leave the EU and rising scepticism in many European countries, is there a bleak future for the integration process? Roland Benedikter and Ireneusz Pawel Karolewski argue that the EU is in a significantly […]

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  • Permalink A sign at Tbilisi Airport celebrating the Association Agreement signed between the EU and Georgia, Credit: Max FrasGallery

    Four takeaways from Albania’s EU visa liberalisation journey for Georgia

Four takeaways from Albania’s EU visa liberalisation journey for Georgia

New rules allowing Georgian citizens to travel to the Schengen Area without a visa will come into full effect today. As Max Fras writes, EU visa liberalisation has been presented by the Georgian government as a major success story, but drawing on the experience of Albania, he presents four lessons that the country’s politicians should keep in mind now […]

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    The Scottish and UK governments should beware the Ides of March

The Scottish and UK governments should beware the Ides of March

Theresa May and Nicola Sturgeon will meet today to discuss the triggering of Article 50, which will begin the process of the UK leaving the European Union. Simon Toubeau and Jo Murkens assess the likely issues up for discussion, noting that if the two leaders maintain the direction they have taken, there could be a bumpy road ahead for […]

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Election reaction: The status quo wins in Bulgaria

Bulgaria held parliamentary elections on 26 March, with preliminary results indicating that GERB, led by Boyko Borisov, had emerged as the largest party. Dimitar Bechev analyses the results, writing that despite the Bulgarian Socialist Party building on their success in last year’s presidential election to run GERB close, the results showed the resilience of the status quo in the […]

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Armenia’s watershed election: More free, but less fair

As Armenia prepares for a parliamentary election on 2 April, the coming contest has already been marred by pronounced polarisation and deep division. With Armenia moving to a full parliamentary form of government, writes Richard Giragosian, the election will be particularly significant and could very well shape the future of the country.

Armenia is preparing to hold a watershed election for […]

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  • Permalink Vigil in London on 23 March, Credit: <a href=Steve Eason (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    The London attack traumatised all of us living in the UK, but we must not allow it to poison and divide us

The London attack traumatised all of us living in the UK, but we must not allow it to poison and divide us

Reflecting on the terrorist attack that took place in London on 22 March, which claimed the lives of four people, George Kassimeris writes on the nature of the modern terrorist threat that countries across Europe must now tackle. He notes that while the attack was traumatic for everyone living in the UK, it cannot be allowed to foster divisions in society.

One […]

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    What an algorithm for expelling rebels and rewarding a party’s loyal MPs could look like

What an algorithm for expelling rebels and rewarding a party’s loyal MPs could look like

The use of modern technology in politics has become increasingly important in recent years, but what new opportunities could technology have for the political parties of the future? Taking inspiration from a statement by the Five Star Movement’s Beppe Grillo, Andrea Ceron outlines what an algorithm for expelling rebel MPs and rewarding loyal party members could look like. He […]

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    Fair or not? How credit rating agencies calculated their ratings during the Eurozone crisis

Fair or not? How credit rating agencies calculated their ratings during the Eurozone crisis

Credit rating agencies received a great deal of criticism during the Eurozone crisis, but what actually explains the changes that occur in a country’s credit rating? Drawing on new research, Periklis Boumparis, Costas Milas and Theodore Panagiotidis write that ratings agencies have responded differently to low-rated and high-rated Eurozone countries. Regulatory quality and competitiveness have a stronger impact for low […]

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    The Troika gave Ireland more autonomy over social security cuts than is commonly recognised

The Troika gave Ireland more autonomy over social security cuts than is commonly recognised

The so called ‘Troika’ of the European Commission, European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund was frequently criticised during the Eurozone crisis on the basis that it had imposed austerity on countries requiring a bailout. But how accurate was this picture in reality? Drawing on new research in Ireland, Rod Hick writes that the nature of Troika supervision […]

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    What if the angry white man is a woman? The gender gap in voting for the populist radical right

What if the angry white man is a woman? The gender gap in voting for the populist radical right

The archetypal populist radical right voter is usually thought of as being male, with female voters less likely to back these parties in elections. But many of these parties have nevertheless drawn on a substantial share of support from women. Outlining results from a recent study, Niels Spierings writes that although there is a gender gap in support for […]

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    A few reasons why Le Pen could win the French presidential election, and a few more why she’ll still fall short

A few reasons why Le Pen could win the French presidential election, and a few more why she’ll still fall short

We are now entering the last month of campaigning before the first round of voting in the French presidential election on 23 April, with Marine Le Pen still leading in many opinion polls for the first round, but behind in polling for the second round. Ben Margulies assesses some of the key factors in her favour, and several more […]

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    Bulgaria heads to the polls – and the tide may be turning against Boyko Borisov

Bulgaria heads to the polls – and the tide may be turning against Boyko Borisov

Bulgarians will vote in a parliamentary election on 26 March. Dimitar Bechev argues that this time, the tide may be turning against Sofia’s most established politico and former PM Boyko Borisov, as polls suggest a neck and neck race between his centre-right party GERB and the Socialists. However, the next government will likely encompass a broad coalition and the real winner […]

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    Why the fear of Islamization is driving populist right support – and what to do about it

Why the fear of Islamization is driving populist right support – and what to do about it

Mainstream parties need to begin addressing conservative whites’ anxieties about the demographic growth of Islam, or populists will continue to thrive, writes Eric Kaufmann. He argues that this demands a sustained programme for improving ‘demographic literacy’.

Geert Wilders may not have come first in the Dutch election, but he came second and forced his opponent, Mark Rutte, to tack closer to Wilders’ […]

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    A weaker economic case, but a stronger political one – how Yes could win a second referendum in Scotland

A weaker economic case, but a stronger political one – how Yes could win a second referendum in Scotland

Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, stated on 13 March that she intends to seek a new referendum on Scottish independence. Stuart Brown assesses how this second referendum campaign might play out. He writes that the Yes side would have a far more problematic economic picture to contend with than they had in 2014, but that the political argument for […]

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    Sir Ivor Roberts: Milosevic was a pyromaniac and a firefighter – but he would never admit to being the former

Sir Ivor Roberts: Milosevic was a pyromaniac and a firefighter – but he would never admit to being the former

Sir Ivor Roberts, the British ambassador to Yugoslavia in the 1990s, speaks to EUROPP Editor Tena Prelec about his new book: “Conversations with Milosevic”. 

During your postings in former Yugoslavia you had multiple encounters with Slobodan Milosevic. Was he indeed the monster most people now view him as?

There is a divergence between the way I worked with him – because my […]

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    The High Representative’s ‘double hat’: How Mogherini and Ashton have differed in their links with the Commission

The High Representative’s ‘double hat’: How Mogherini and Ashton have differed in their links with the Commission

Federica Mogherini took over from Catherine Ashton as the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy in November 2014. But how have the two High Representatives differed in their approach? Based on a quantitative analysis of both of their speeches and statements, Nicolai von Ondarza and Ronja Scheler illustrate that Mogherini has been much […]

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    Bursting the liberal bubble: Racism in the era of Brexit and Trump

Bursting the liberal bubble: Racism in the era of Brexit and Trump

Recent political developments have revived discussions on racism. But did we ever see the ‘end of racism’? Drawing on extensive research on the historical articulations of racism across Europe, Katy Sian explains how in the post-racial society, debates on anti-racism became invisible. This confusion allowed racism to grow unchecked.
Post-racialism and anti-racism
Between 2010 and 2013, when myself and colleagues at the […]

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    Final look at the Dutch election: A campaign of limited drama looks set to produce a remarkably fragmented parliament

Final look at the Dutch election: A campaign of limited drama looks set to produce a remarkably fragmented parliament

Dutch voters will go to the polls today for parliamentary elections against the backdrop of a diplomatic spat between the Netherlands and Turkey. Hans Vollaard writes that until the Turkish incident, the campaign had been surprisingly low-key, but the polling suggests an unprecedented level of fragmentation in parliament, with no party likely to win more than 30 seats.

The campaign […]

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    A second independence referendum in Scotland: The legal issues

A second independence referendum in Scotland: The legal issues

Following Nicola Sturgeon’s announcement of a second independence referendum for Scotland, Stephen Tierney discusses how the next two years are set to be consumed by two parallel processes: We will see the UK leave the EU and could also see Scotland leave the UK in an effort to remain within the EU. 

Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh. Credits: Laszlo Ilyes (CC BY 2.0)
Scottish […]

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