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Three challenges in contemporary populism research

Populism has become one of the most hotly debated topics in European politics, but how should academics seek to study it? Yannis Stavrakakis identifies three key challenges in contemporary populism research: the need for critical reflexivity, the use of minimal definitions, and the difficulty in capturing and accounting for different types or degrees of populism.

Today populism seems to be […]

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    Book Review: Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France by Jim Wolfreys

Book Review: Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France by Jim Wolfreys

In Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France, Jim Wolfreys describes the emergence of a ‘respectable racism’ against Muslims in France since the 1980s, fuelled by the ‘War on Terror’ and rooted in the nation’s colonial history. Praising the book’s candid and incisive writing, Elsa Stéphan welcomes this as a commendably comprehensive and accessible account on Islamophobia in contemporary France. 
Republic of Islamophobia: The […]

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    Leavers have a better understanding of Remainers’ motivations than vice versa

Leavers have a better understanding of Remainers’ motivations than vice versa

Why did people really vote to Leave or Remain? Noah Carl examines four different polls, and finds that immigration and sovereignty headed Leavers’ reasons – contrary to suggestions that the vote was intended to ‘teach politicians a lesson’. Leavers also proved better at characterising Remainers’ reasons than vice versa – something which may be linked to progressives’ greater tendency to disengage from […]

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    Italy’s post-electoral intrigues shed light on the country’s political culture

Italy’s post-electoral intrigues shed light on the country’s political culture

Following difficult negotiations in the aftermath of the Italian election on 4 March, Italy’s President, Sergio Mattarella, has stated the country has two options: a neutral ‘technical’ government, or new elections. Roland Benedikter writes that the situation points toward prolonged instability and more short-term arrangements rather than the stable reform alliance which the country urgently needs.

Credit: Davide Oliva (CC […]

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    History will judge ETA as a failed terrorist group, but there are lessons to be learned

History will judge ETA as a failed terrorist group, but there are lessons to be learned

The Basque separatist group ETA has formally announced it is disbanding, following a decades-long campaign that claimed the lives of over 800 people. George Kassimeris writes that ETA’s conception of the political environment was always one of resistance and violence. But while history will judge ETA as a failed terrorist group, the lesson for the rest of Europe is […]

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Reforming immigration for a post-Brexit reality

What impact could lower levels of immigration in the UK following Brexit have on the country’s economy? Lisa Laird and Otto Ilveskero write that the UK faces a challenge in retaining a controlled flow of both high and lower-skilled workers to fill gaps in the domestic workforce. They argue that reforming the present Visa Points Based System would allow Britain to retain international talent passing through […]

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Turkey vs Greece: Is war a real possibility?

Tensions have escalated between Greece and Turkey in recent months over territorial disputes in the Aegean, with a collision between a Turkish cargo ship and a Greek war ship on 4 May prompting a nervous response from some observers. Thimios Tzallas writes that although there are incentives for Greek and Turkish politicians to give the impression they are playing […]

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    Assessing the impact of new European defence initiatives on transatlantic relations

Assessing the impact of new European defence initiatives on transatlantic relations

The European Union is in the process of implementing a number of new defence initiatives, notably a new Permanent Structured Cooperation on security and defence (PESCO) and a European Defence Fund. Antonio Calcara examines how these new initiatives are likely to affect relations with the United States, with some figures in the US already expressing concern that the new […]

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    Book Review: Europe Reset: New Directions for the EU by Richard Youngs

Book Review: Europe Reset: New Directions for the EU by Richard Youngs

In Europe Reset: New Directions for the EU, Richard Youngs looks at the issue of democracy in Europe, identifying a crisis rooted in alienation from the prevailing model of integration and proposing new initiatives for democratic participation by citizens. While the book largely focuses on democracy on the supra-national level, which may overlook the need for improvement both nationally and sub-nationally, this […]

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    Yulia Tymoshenko’s policies sit uneasily with her image as a pro-European politician

Yulia Tymoshenko’s policies sit uneasily with her image as a pro-European politician

Yulia Tymoshenko, who played a major part in Ukraine’s Orange Revolution, is typically regarded as one of the most high profile pro-western figures in Ukrainian politics. Taras Kuzio argues that despite this reputation, her policies on a number of key issues are at odds with her pro-European image.

Vox Ukraine, a well-known and respected Kyiv think tank, has become a […]

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    A revolution of values: Freedom, responsibility, and courage in the Armenian Velvet Revolution

A revolution of values: Freedom, responsibility, and courage in the Armenian Velvet Revolution

Mass protests in Armenia, which began in April and led to the resignation of Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan, have been dubbed a ‘Velvet Revolution’. Armine Ishkanian explains that this revolution has been rooted in the values of Armenian society and its domestic, socio-economic and political realities, rather than geopolitics or foreign relations. But with events developing rapidly, it remains […]

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    Eurorealist or Eurosceptic? Assessing the future of the European Conservatives and Reformists after 2019

Eurorealist or Eurosceptic? Assessing the future of the European Conservatives and Reformists after 2019

The European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR) are currently the third-largest group in the European Parliament, but with Brexit set to deprive the group of one of its largest members – the UK’s Conservative Party – there is uncertainty about the ECR’s future trajectory. Martin Steven writes that despite Brexit, there is every indication the ECR will continue after the […]

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    Why voters in emerging democracies are more reliable than we thought

Why voters in emerging democracies are more reliable than we thought

Elections in new democracies such as those in Central and Eastern Europe are often expected to be volatile affairs, with sizeable shifts in support between parties from one election to another. But is this really a fair characterisation of how citizens of these states choose to use their vote? Presenting findings from a new study, Daniel Bochsler and Miriam […]

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What are the prospects for the Polish left?

Poland’s communist successor party has seen its opinion poll ratings increase in recent months. This upturn in support came after the revival of debates about the country’s communist past prompted by government legislation affecting the interests of its core electorate. But as Aleks Szczerbiak writes, the party’s leadership has failed to develop any new ideas or initiatives that can […]

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    Book Review: The Nordic Models in Political Science: Challenged, but Still Viable? edited by Oddbjørn Knutsen

Book Review: The Nordic Models in Political Science: Challenged, but Still Viable? edited by Oddbjørn Knutsen

In The Nordic Models in Political Science: Challenged, but Still Viable?, editor Oddbjørn Knutsen and contributors provide a useful update on the current state of the ‘Nordic models’. This book is a timely reminder that alternative models of governance exist and will nourish debates about the UK’s future following the Brexit vote to leave the European Union. ‘Where do we go from here?’ […]

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April 29th, 2018|featured|0 Comments|

Why Russia is economically weak and politically strong

In GDP terms, the Russian economy is much smaller than that of the EU, yet from a political and military perspective, Russia is a major player in global affairs. Paul De Grauwe argues that Europe grants Russia this power by leaving defence as a matter for each of its constituent nations, instead of having a combined army.

Moscow, Credit: greg westfall (CC BY 2.0)
A few […]

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The problem with Iceland’s proposed ban on circumcision

A proposal to ban circumcision for non-medical reasons in Iceland has generated a heated debate over whether banning the practice would amount to an attack on religious freedom. Iddo Porat argues that we should be suspicious of any majority proposed legislation which affects only minority groups.

This article is one of two pieces published by EUROPP on this topic. For an […]

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    Caught between two stools: The Five Star Movement and government policy

Caught between two stools: The Five Star Movement and government policy

The Five Star Movement has cultivated an image as a party that exists outside of the traditional left/right spectrum, and this image underpinned the party’s success in the 2018 Italian general election, where it secured over 32% of the vote. But as Pierangelo Isernia and Gianluca Piccolino explain, the diverse nature of the Five Star Movement’s supporters poses a […]

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    Russian concessions to Europe are unlikely, and European concessions to Russia are useless

Russian concessions to Europe are unlikely, and European concessions to Russia are useless

Is there any prospect of an end to the deterioration of relations between the EU and Russia? Irina Busygina explains that Vladimir Putin’s strategy for maintaining domestic support has focused on the construction of external threats and the promotion of an image of ‘Russian greatness’ on the international stage. But by putting foreign policy in the service of domestic […]

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    What the European Commission’s 2018 country reports say about national parliaments in the Western Balkans

What the European Commission’s 2018 country reports say about national parliaments in the Western Balkans

The European Commission recently published its annual reports on six EU candidate countries and potential candidates in the Western Balkans. Blerim Vela examines what the reports had to say about national parliaments in the region. He notes that several of the parliaments have experienced opposition boycotts and disruption in recent years, underlining the challenges associated with ensuring parliamentary procedures […]

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